Rochdale Town Hall: Wikis

  
  

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Rochdale Town Hall

Rochdale Town Hall is a town hall in Rochdale, Greater Manchester, England that houses much of the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale's government and administrative functions. Completed by architect William Henry Crossland in 1871, it is one of the United Kingdom's finest examples of Victorian Gothic revival architecture.[1]

A major landmark for Rochdale, the building is a Grade I listed building.[2]

The original clock tower, which rose to 240 feet (73.2 m), was destroyed by fire in 1883. The present shorter (and less flamboyant) tower was designed by Alfred Waterhouse in 1887.[1]

The stained glass window on the south side is said to have been admired by Adolf Hitler who, an American academic believed, wanted to ship the building, brick-by-brick, to Germany had the Nazis won World War II.[3]

The front of the town hall has gargoyles and gilded statues of lions which bear traditional emblems of Rochdale, Lancashire and Yorkshire.

It was on the balcony of this building that Rochdale's own Gracie Fields received the Honorary Freedom of the Borough to crowds of thousands who turned out to greet her in the pouring rain.

References

  1. ^ a b Cunningham, C (1981). Victorian & Edwardian Town Halls. London: Routeledge.  
  2. ^ "Town Hall, Rochdale". Images of England. http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/Details/Default.aspx?id=358886&mode=quick. Retrieved 2007-12-22.  
  3. ^ Anon (2006-10-07). "Amazing windows always a glass act". rochdaleobserver.co.uk. http://www.rochdaleobserver.co.uk/community/nostalgia/s/518/518474_amazing_windows_always_a_glass_act.html. Retrieved 2007-12-22.  







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