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Rod Paige


In office
January 20, 2001 – January 20, 2005
President George W. Bush
Preceded by Richard Riley
Succeeded by Margaret Spellings

Born June 17, 1933 (1933-06-17) (age 76)
Monticello, Mississippi
Political party Republican
Alma mater Jackson State University
Indiana University-Bloomington

Roderick Raynor "Rod" Paige (born June 17, 1933), served as the 7th United States Secretary of Education from 2001 to 2005. Paige, who grew up in Mississippi, built a career on a belief that education equalizes opportunity, moving from college dean and school superintendent to be the first African American to serve as the nation's education chief. As an expert on educational reform it is interesting to note that he has never actually been a classroom teacher.

Paige was sitting with George W. Bush at the Emma E. Booker Elementary School in Sarasota, Florida, when Bush received the news that a second plane had hit the World Trade Center in the September 11, 2001 attacks.

On November 15, 2004, Paige announced his resignation after overseeing the President's education agenda for four years. White House domestic policy adviser Margaret Spellings was nominated as his successor. The U.S. Senate confirmed her on January 20, 2005 after Bush's inauguration for a second term.

Contents

Early life

Born in Monticello, Mississippi, Paige is the son of public school educators. He earned a bachelor's degree from Jackson State University in Mississippi and a Master's degree and a Doctor of Physical Education degree from Indiana University Bloomington. He also holds an honorary doctoral degree from the University of Houston, which was presented to him in 2000.

Career

Paige is the Chairman of the Chartwell Education Group, a company that supports schools, districts, and education boards.

Paige began his career coaching college-level athletics. He then served for a decade as Dean of the College of Education at Texas Southern University. He also established the university's Center for Excellence in Urban Education, a research facility that concentrates on issues related to instruction and management in urban school systems.

As a trustee and an officer of the Board of Education of the Houston Independent School District (HISD) from 1989 to 1994, Paige coauthored the board's A Declaration of Beliefs and Visions, a statement of purpose and goals for the school district that called for fundamental reform through decentralization, a focus on instruction, accountability at all levels, and development of a core curriculum. A Declaration of Beliefs and Visions was the catalyst that launched the ongoing, comprehensive restructuring of HISD.

Paige became the superintendent of schools of HISD in 1994. As superintendent, Paige created the Peer Examination, Evaluation, and Redesign (PEER) program, which solicits recommendations from business and community professionals for strengthening school support services and programs. He launched a system of charter schools that have broad authority in decisions regarding staffing, textbooks, and materials. He saw to it that HISD paid teachers salaries competitive with those offered by other large Texas school districts. Superintendent Paige made HISD the first school district in the state to institute performance contracts modeled on those in the private sector, whereby senior staff members' continued employment with HISD is based on their performance. He also introduced teacher incentive pay, which rewards teachers for raising test scores.

Many touted the "Houston Miracle" accomplished under Paige where student test scores rose under his leadership. A 60 Minutes report exposed many dropout rates touted in the "Houston Miracle" as false; deliberate fraud occurred at Sharpstown High School, for instance.[1]. Not only were dropout rates falsified, but Houston area teachers admitted to raising test scores (for which they received cash bonuses) by cheating.[2].

Paige once referred to the National Education Association, the nation's largest teachers union, as a "terrorist organization."[3].

Other activities

Paige has served on review committees of the Texas Education Agency and the State Board of Education's Task Force on High School Education, and he has chaired the Youth Employment Issues Subcommittee of the National Commission for Employment Policy of the U.S. Department of Labor. Paige is a member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. He is a former member of the Houston Job Training Partnership Council, the Community Advisory Board of Texas Commerce Bank, the American Leadership Forum, and the board of directors of the Texas Business and Education Coalition. He is a prominent member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.

Legacy

Houston ISD renamed campus of James Bowie Elementary School after Paige, naming it Rod Paige Elementary School.

References

  1. ^ CBS News report on Paige
  2. ^ "How Schools Cheat"
  3. ^ FOXNews report on Paige

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Edward Clemons
Jackson State University Head Football Coach
1964–1968
Succeeded by
Ulysses McPhearson
Preceded by
Al Benefield
Texas Southern University Head Football Coach
1971–1975
Succeeded by
Wendell Mosley
Political offices
Preceded by
Richard Riley
United States Secretary of Education
2001 – 2005
Succeeded by
Margaret Spellings
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Simple English

Rod Paige
File:Rod


In office
January 20, 2001 – January 20, 2005
President George W. Bush
Preceded by Richard Riley
Succeeded by Margaret Spellings

Born June 17, 1933 (1933-06-17) (age 77)
Monticello, Mississippi
Political party Republican
Alma mater Jackson State University
Indiana University-Bloomington

Roderick Raynor "Rod" Paige (born June 17, 1933), served as the 7th United States Secretary of Education from 2001 to 2005. He was the first African American to serve as the nation's education chief. He earned a bachelor's degree from Jackson State University in Mississippi and a Master's degree and an Ed.D from Indiana University Bloomington. He also holds an honorary doctoral degree from the University of Houston presented to him in 2000.

Paige was sitting with George W. Bush at the Emma E. Booker Elementary School in Sarasota, Florida, when Bush received the news that a second plane had hit the World Trade Center in the September 11, 2001 attacks.

On November 15, 2004, Paige announced his resignation after overseeing the President's education agenda for four years. White House domestic policy adviser Margaret Spellings was nominated as his successor. The U.S. Senate confirmed her on January 20, 2005 after Bush's inauguration for a second term.


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