Roderick Strong: Wikis

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Roderick Strong
Ring name(s) The Jester
Roderick Strong
Roderick Swarm
Billed height 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)[1]
Billed weight 212 lb (96 kg)[1]
Born July 26, 1983 (1983-07-26) (age 26)[1]
Wisconsin, United States[2]
Resides Tampa, Florida, United States[2]
Billed from New Orleans, Louisiana
Tampa, Florida
Trained by Jim Neidhart[3]
The Warlord[3]
Prince Iaukea[3]
Tim Mahoney
His father[3]
Debut 2000[1]

Chris Lindsey (born July 26, 1983) is an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, Roderick Strong. Strong currently competes in several independent promotions, most notably Ring of Honor (ROH), Full Impact Pro (FIP), and Pro Wrestling Guerrilla (PWG).

He initially debuted as The Jester on the Floridian independent circuit, before quickly changing his name to Roderick Strong. He worked for IPW Hardcore and NWA Florida, before debuting for ROH in September 2003. In mid-2004, Strong joined forces with Alex Shelley, Austin Aries, and Jack Evans, collectively known as Generation Next. As part of Generation Next, Strong won the ROH World Tag Team Championship with Aries. Strong later turned on Aries, forming a new faction, the No Remorse Corps with Davey Richards and Rocky Romero. During this time, he was also competing for ROH's sister promotion, FIP, and debuted for PWG. Strong also toured Japan with Dragon Gate and had a brief stint in Total Nonstop Action Wrestling in 2005.

In ROH, Strong is a one-time ROH World Tag Team Champion with Aries, and also won the 2005 Survival of the Fittest tournament. In FIP, he won the FIP World Heavyweight Championship on two occasions, and held the FIP Tag Team Championship with Erick Stevens. In PWG, he held the PWG World Tag Team Championship three time, once with PAC, once with Davey Richards, and once with Evans. He has also won numerous other championships in independent promotions.

Contents

Career

Lindsey was born in Wisconsin, but relocated to Florida at a young age. Following a troubled childhood, Lindsey graduated from Riverview High School, where he played American football, He went on to attend the University of South Florida on an academic scholarship. Lindsey majored in Business for two years before postponing his academic career.[2][4]

In the autumn of 1994, Lindsey's father, a former collegiate wrestler, began training as a wrestler under Jim Neidhart. After Lindsey attended several training sessions and met Harry Smith, a third generation wrestler, he decided to become a wrestler. Lindsey was trained by Neidhart and a number of other wrestlers in Tampa, Florida and debuted in 2000 as The Jester on the Floridian independent circuit for the RWA.[3][4]

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IPW Hardcore

Strong wrestled his first match for the Independent Professional Wrestling promotion, competing in a twenty man cruiserweight Battle royal. He was initially one-third of a stable known as "Risk Factor" with The Kamikaze Kid & Kid Lethal before he formed a tag team with his trainee and kayfabe brother, Sedrick Strong. The Strong Brothers defeated Wrongful Death (Naphtali and Dagon Briggs) for the IPW Tag Team Championship on June 28, 2002 in St. Petersburg, Florida. They held the title until September 20, when they lost to Naturally Marvelous (Scoot Andrews and Mike Sullivan) in a steel cage match in which Roderick suffered a concussion.[3][4][5]

After Sedrick cost the Strong Brothers a number of matches, Roderick turned heel on February 8, 2003, betraying Sedrick and aligning himself with the Alliance of Defiance, a dominant heel stable.[6]

NWA Florida

After IPW closed down in late 2003, Strong began working for NWA Florida, a promotion which had had a working relationship with IPW for two years. Strong defeated David Babylon for the Florida Unified Cruiserweight Championship on July 19, 2003 in St. Petersburg. While Strong was champion, the title was renamed the Florida Unified Junior Heavyweight Championship. He lost the title to Jerrelle Clark in a four way match on December 13, 2003 in St. Petersburg. Clark vacated the title on January 10, 2004 after winning the NWA World Junior Heavyweight Championship, and Strong defeated Mikey Batts for the vacant title on February 21 in the New Alhambra Sports and Entertainment Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He lost the title to Sedrick Strong on April 29, 2004, in New Port Richey, Florida.[4][7][8]

In addition to wrestling for NWA Florida, Strong served as the head trainer of the NWA Florida wrestling school.[6]

Ring of Honor

Strong joined the Pennsylvania-based Ring of Honor (ROH) promotion in September 2003. On May 22, 2004, at Generation Next he formed a stable known as Generation Next with Alex Shelley, Austin Aries and Jack Evans. Generation Next quickly dominated the ROH roster, declaring themselves the future of wrestling. After defeating several other stables, they defeated CM Punk, Ace Steel, John Walters and Jimmy Jacobs (mentored by Ricky Steamboat) on October 2 at The Midnight Express Reunion.[1]

Strong began punctuating his ring style with stiff offense, acting as the enforcer of Generation Next. In November 2004 he formed a regular tag team with Evans, and on December 26 he, Evans and Aries threw Shelley out of the group when he refused to resign as leader. Strong and Evans continued to team throughout early-2005, but were unable to win the ROH Tag Team Championship. On July 9, 2005 at Escape from New York, Strong faced CM Punk for the ROH World Championship, but was defeated. On September 24 at Survival of the Fittest 2005, Strong defeated Samoa Joe, Jay Lethal, Generation Next teammate Austin Aries, and Colt Cabana to win the titular event, thus earning himself another shot at the ROH World Championship in the future.[1][4]

Strong during his signature ring entrance.

On October 1 at Joe vs. Kobashi, valet Jade Chung aligned herself with Strong (and the remainder of Generation Next) after he defeated her former client, Jimmy Rave. The following night, Strong defeated James Gibson in his last match for Ring of Honor before returning to World Wrestling Entertainment. Following the match, Gibson gave a farewell speech in which he called Strong the "MVP" of Ring of Honor.[1][4]

Strong lost to ROH World Champion Bryan Danielson on October 29 in Woodbridge, Connecticut and on November 5 in Chicago, with the match going over 45 minutes. On March 31 in Chicago, Strong faced Bryan Danielson a third time for the ROH World Championship, with a 60 minute time limit, but Roderick came up short with Danielson rolling up Strong at the 56 minute mark for the victory.[1]

At Final Battle 2005 on December 17, 2005, Strong and Aries defeated Sal Rinauro and Tony Mamaluke to win the ROH World Tag Team Championship. They held the titles until September 16, 2006, when they were defeated by The Kings of Wrestling (Chris Hero and Claudio Castagnoli). In February 2007, Strong turned on Aries to form a new faction with Davey Richards called the No Remorse Corps.[1]

The No Remorse Corps went on to feud with Aries' new faction The Resilience. Rocky Romero joined the NRC, while Matt Cross and Erick Stevens joined The Resilience. Though the NRC dominated the feud for the most part, the feud's end came with Strong losing matches to Aries at both Undeniable and Reckless Abandon in a 30-minute Iron Man Match.

Strong then began to feud with Stevens over the FIP title. Strong lost the title to Stevens at Final Battle 2007, but won it back at FIP Redefined. He continued to hold onto the belt in several matches with Stevens, and won a Fight Without Honor against Stevens at ROH Respect is Earned II by superplexing Stevens off a ladder through two tables. However, he lost the FIP title to Stevens at FIP Hot Summer Nights 2008 in a Dog Collar match to end their feud.

At Respect is Earned II, Davey Richards turned on Strong to join Sweet and Sour Inc. Since then Strong has been feuding with the group, often being on the losing side of matches. On an episode of ROH on HDNet, Roderick was chosen as a judge for the Tyler Black/Austin Aries match for the ROH World Title on February 13. Roderick only became the judge, because Tyler promised him a Title match, after he wins the belt from Aries.

Total Nonstop Action Wrestling

In his first major appearance with Total Nonstop Action Wrestling, Strong lost a special "Showcase Match" to Austin Aries at the TNA Unbreakable pay-per-view on September 11, 2005. On September 22, it was announced that he had signed a contract with TNA, and would wrestle A.J. Styles on the first episode of TNA Impact! on Spike TV on October 1. Strong went on to lose the subsequent bout.[1][4]

In December 2005, Strong toured Japan with the Dragon Gate promotion. In 2006, he formed a stable in TNA with Austin Aries and Alex Shelley. In February 2006, he and Aries were both suspended for two months for arriving four hours late for the pay-per-view TNA Against All Odds 2006.[9] He returned to TNA in April 2006, but was released shortly thereafter.

Full Impact Pro

On November 10, 2006, in Inverness, Florida, Strong defeated Bryan Danielson in a title-versus-career match to win the FIP Heavyweight Championship, the heavyweight championship of the Floridian Full Impact Pro promotion. When he defended the title against Pac in Liverpool on the 3rd of March, the FIP Heavyweight championship became the FIP World Heavyweight Championship.

Pro Wrestling Guerrilla

Strong had his first match in Pro Wrestling Guerrilla on February 12, 2005, wrestling a total of two matches in that year. After he and Jack Evans defeated El Generico and Human Tornado, the two challenged Davey Richards and Super Dragon for the PWG World Tag Team Championship, but were defeated.

Throughout 2006, Strong won numerous singles matches and took part in the Battle of Los Angeles tournament, losing to Richards. On November 17, 2006, Strong teamed with Richards to defeat Super Dragon and B-Boy for the PWG World Tag Team Championship; however, Super Dragon and B-Boy regained the title on the following day.

Strong would win his second PWG tag title as a result of the Dynamite Duumvirate Tag Team Title Tournament held in May 2007 to determine new PWG World Tag Team Champions. This time, however, Strong would win the titles with UK wrestler PAC. Strong would enter PWG's Battle of Los Angeles and defeat Austin Aries, Joey Ryan and Alex Shelley on his way to the finals before being defeated by CIMA.

On May 17 and 18 Strong entered PWG's second annual DDT4 tag team tournament this time with partner Jack Evans. They would go on to defeat the teams of Scorpio Sky and Ronin and Los Luchas on their way to the finals where they defeated the PWG Tag Team Champions Kevin Steen and El Generico to become champions. This was Strong's second victory in a DDT4 tournament.

On July 6, 2008 at Life During Wartime in Reseda, California, Jimmy Jacobs and Tyler Black defeated the team of El Generico (substituting for Jack Evans) and Strong to win the PWG World Tag Team Championship.

In wrestling

Strong boston crab.jpg
Strong performing a Boston crab in 2009

Strong-Evans Ode to the Bulldogs.jpg
Strong and Jack Evans performing Ode to the Bulldogs on Scorpio Sky and Ronin.
  • Nicknames
    • "The Master of the Backbreaker"
    • "The Messiah of the Backbreaker"

Championships and accomplishments

  • American Wrestling Federation
    • AWF Heavyweight Championship (1 time)
  • Florida Entertainment Wrestling
    • FEW Heavyweight Championship (1 time)
  • Independent Professional Wrestling
    • IPW Florida Unified Cruiserweight Championship (1 time)[7]
    • IPW Tag Team Championship (1 time) – with Sedrick Strong[5]
  • Independent Wrestling Association East Coast
    • IWA-EC Heavyweight Championship (1 time, current)[10]
  • Lethal Wrestling Federation
    • LWF Heavyweight Championship (1 time)
Regional
  • South Florida Championship Wrestling
    • SFCW Heavyweight Championship (1 time)
    • SFCW Tag Team Championship (1 time) – with Justin Venom

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Roderick Strong". http://www.accelerator3359.com/Wrestling/bios/strong.html. Retrieved May 30, 2007. 
  2. ^ a b c Forman, R. (February 24, 2006). "Outside The Ring: Roderick Strong". Total Nonstop Action Wrestling. http://www.tnawrestling.com/news/fullnews2.php?all=493. Retrieved May 30, 2007. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Wojcik, A. (February 8, 2003). "Interview with Roderick & Sedrick Strong". http://alanwojcik.tripod.com/archives/id7.html. Retrieved May 30, 2007. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Milner, J.. "Roderick Strong". Canadian Online Explorer. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/Bios/strong_roderick.html. Retrieved May 30, 2007. 
  5. ^ a b Westcott, B. (2003). "Independent Professional Wrestling (Florida) Tag Team Title History". Solie.org. http://www.solie.org/titlehistories/ttipw2.html. Retrieved May 30, 2007. 
  6. ^ a b Wojcik, A. (June 14, 2003). "Interview with Roderick Strong". http://alanwojcik.com/archives/id23.html. Retrieved May 30, 2007. 
  7. ^ a b Westcott, B. and Knights, K. (2003). "Independent Professional Wrestling (Florida) Light Heavyweight / Cruiserweight Title History". Solie.org. http://www.solie.org/titlehistories/lhtipw2.html. Retrieved May 30, 2007. 
  8. ^ a b Roelfsema, E., Capo, J. and Knights, K. (2005). "NWA Florida X Title History". Solie.org. http://www.solie.org/titlehistories/fxcnwa.html. Retrieved May 30, 2007. 
  9. ^ Brady, Hicks. "2006: The year in wrestling". PWI Presents: 2007 Wrestling Almanak and book of facts (Kappa Publications): p. 17–18. 2007 Edition. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "Online World of Wrestling profile". Online World of Wrestling. http://www.onlineworldofwrestling.com/profiles/r/roderick-strong.html. Retrieved 2009-09-10. 
  11. ^ a b c d e "Cagematch profile". Cagematch. http://cagematch.de/?id=2&nr=31. Retrieved 2009-09-10. 
  12. ^ "Guerre Sans Frontières Results". Pro Wrestling Guerrilla. http://www.prowrestlingguerrilla.com/results/2009/show0105.html. Retrieved 2009-09-10. 
  13. ^ a b "Wrestler Entrance Music". Online World of Wrestling. http://www.onlineworldofwrestling.com/information/music/enter/. Retrieved 2009-12-28. 
  14. ^ Wescott, B. (2005). "FIP Heavyweight Title History". Solie.org. http://www.solie.org/titlehistories/htfip.html. Retrieved May 30, 2007. 
  15. ^ "RSST Results". iwamidsouthwrestling.com. http://iwamidsouth.proboards19.com/index.cgi?board=IWA&action=display&thread=5244. Retrieved December 6, 2008. 

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