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Rose hips from an unidentified rose variety
Dog Rose showing the bright red hips

The rose hip and rose haw, is the pomaceous fruit of the rose plant, that typically is red-to-orange, but ranges from dark purple to black in some species. Rose hips begin to form in spring, and ripen in late summer through autumn.

Contents

Health benefits

  • Rose hips contain vitamins C, D and E, essential fatty acids and antioxidant flavonoids.[citation needed]
  • Particularly high in Vitamin C, with about 1700–2000 mg per 100 g in the dried product, one of the richest plant sources. RP-HPLC assays of fresh rose hips and several commercially available products revealed a wide range of L-ascorbic acid content, ranging from 0.03 to 1.3%.[1]
  • Rose hip powder is touted as a remedy for osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.[2]
Wild rose hips of unknown species

Usage

Rose hips are used for herbal tea, jam, jelly, syrup, beverages, pies, bread, and marmalade.

A few rose species are sometimes grown for the ornamental value of their hips, such as Rosa moyesii, which has prominent large red bottle-shaped fruits.

Rose hips have recently become popular as a healthy treat for pet chinchillas. Chinchillas are unable to manufacture their own Vitamin C and lack the proper internal organs to process many vitamin-C rich foods. Rose Hips provide a sugarless, safe way to increase the Vitamin C intake of chinchillas and guinea pigs.

Rose hips are also fed to horses. The dried and powdered form can be fed at a maximum of 1 tablespoon per day to improve coat condition and new hoof growth.

The fine hairs found inside rose hips are used as itching powder. Dried rosehips are also sold for primitive crafts and home fragrance purposes. Rosehips are scented with essential oils and can be used as a potpourri room air freshener.[citation needed]

Roses are propagated from hips by removing the seeds from the aril (the outer coating) and sowing just beneath the surface of the soil. Placed in a cold frame or a greenhouse, the seeds take at least three months to germinate.

In World War II, the people of Britain were encouraged through letters to The Times newspaper, articles in the British Medical Journal, and pamphlets produced by Claire Loewenfeld, a dietitian working for Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children to gather wild-grown rose hips and to make a Vitamin C syrup for children. This was because German submarines were sinking many commercial ships: citrus fruits from the tropics were very difficult to import.

Rose hips were used in many food preparations by the indigenous peoples of the Americas.

Rose hips are used for colds and influenza.

Rose hips can be used to make Palinka, a traditional Hungarian alcoholic beverage.

Rose hips of some species, especially Rosa canina (Dog Rose) and R. majalis, have been used as a source of Vitamin C. Rose hips are commonly used as a herbal tea, often blended with hibiscus and as an oil. They can also be used to make jam, jelly, marmalade and wine. Rose hip soup, "nyponsoppa," is especially popular in Sweden. Rhodomel, a type of mead, is made with rose hips.

See also

References

  1. ^ Ziegler SJ, Meier B, Sticher O. (1986).
    • Fast and selective assay of L-ascorbic acid in rose hips by RP-HPLC coupled with electrochemical and/or spectrophotometric detection. Planta Med. 52(5):383-387.
  2. ^ Richards, Erin (2008). "In Pain? Stop and Smell the Roses". http://www.livescience.com/health/080926-roses-arthritis.html. Retrieved 2008-09-26. 

External links

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Simple English

Rose hips (also called rose haws) are the fruit of the rose plant. They can be eaten ( with caution, the rose hip contains irritant hairs) and have a lot of Vitamin C. It is usually red/orange but may be dark purple to black in some species. Rose hips are commonly used as an herbal tea.

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