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Royal Canadian Air Cadets
Air Cadet Ensign II.jpg
Royal Canadian Air Cadets Ensign
Active April 1941-Present
Country Canada
Type Youth Organization
Size 452 Sqns (25,000+ cadets)
Part of Canadian Cadet Organization
Headquarters Ottawa, Canada
Patron Her Excellency The Right Honourable, Michaëlle Jean
Motto To Learn - To Serve - To Advance
March Quick: RCAF March Past
Commanders
Honorary Air Commodore HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh
Aircraft flown
Trainer Schweizer SGS 2-33/2-33A

Royal Canadian Air Cadets (RCAirC) is a Canadian national youth program for persons aged 12 to 18. It is administered by the Canadian Forces (CF) and funded through the Department of National Defence (DND) with additional support from the civilian Air Cadet League of Canada (ACL).[1] Together with the Royal Canadian Sea Cadets and Royal Canadian Army Cadets, it forms the "largest federally-funded youth program in the country".[2] Cadets are civilians, they are not members of the military and are not obliged to join the Canadian Forces.

The first squadrons were established in 1941 to train young men for duties during World War II.[3][4] The purpose has since changed to focus on citizenship, leadership, physical fitness, general aviation and stimulating an interest in the activities of the Canadian Forces.

The majority of cadet training takes place at the local squadron during the regular school year with a percentage of cadets selected for summer training courses at various cadet summer training centres located across Canada. Central to the air cadet program are the gliding and flying scholarships offered to air cadets who qualify. One in five private pilots in Canada is an ex-air cadet and 67% of commercial and airline pilots began as air cadets.[5] There are about 450 squadrons located across the country with an approximate enrolment of 24,500 Air Cadets.[6]

Contents

Overview

The aim of Royal Canadian Air Cadets is to: develop in youth the attributes of good citizenship and leadership; promote physical fitness; and stimulate the interest of youth in the sea, land, and air activities of the Canadian Forces. This is the same as for the Sea and Army Cadets; however, each focuses on its own parent element.[7] The Air Cadet motto is "To learn. To serve. To advance."[3]

Persons aged 12 to 18 may join the RC Air Cadets. The organization and rank system of the former Royal Canadian Air Force is used. Cadets are not members of the Canadian Forces and cadets have no power of command over any CF member. Adult leadership is provided by officers of the Canadian Forces Cadet Instructor Cadre Branch, supplemented by contracted Civilian Instructors, authorized adult volunteers, and on occasion, officers and non-commissioned members of other CF branches. Cadet Instructors Cadre (CIC) members are specially trained to deliver the Royal Canadian Sea, Army, and Air Cadet Program, and are drawn from all walks of life: former cadets, former long-service Regular and other Reserve CF members, and the parents of cadets are amongst those attracted to enroll in the Canadian Forces as members of the CIC.[8]

Along with the Royal Canadian Sea Cadets and Royal Canadian Army Cadets, the RCAirC forms part of the Canadian Cadet Organization. Though the RCAirC, and the other cadet programs, have a close relationship with the CF, cadets are not members of the Forces, and are not expected or required to join the Canadian Forces.[9] In keeping with Commonwealth custom, the Royal Canadian Air Cadets stand last in the order of precedence, after the Royal Canadian Sea and Army Cadets.

History

The Air Cadet Organization originated in the early days of World War II when the war effort required young men to meet Canada's military obligations. In 1940, Air Minister Power directed that a nation-wide voluntary organization be formed to sponsor and develop a select group of young men who would be trained to meet the increasing need for operational pilots in the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) during World War II.[10] Prior to 1940, Air Cadet squadrons did not exist and were in fact Army Cadet Corps that were affiliated with RCAF Air Reserve squadrons. On November 11, 1940, an Order-in-Council was passed to establish the Air Cadet League of Canada to work in partnership with the RCAF. The first squadrons were organized in 1941 and by 1942 there were 135 squadrons and 10,000 cadets, mostly recruited from the Army Cadets. In the next year, by 1943, there were 315 squadrons with a membership of 23,000. In 1944, the program reached its peak membership with 29,000 cadets in 374 squadrons.[10]

After the war, membership dropped to a low of 11,000 in 155 squadrons and the Air Cadet program underwent a transformation to reflect the changing needs of Canada and the cadets. The Air Cadet League introduced awards for proficiency and loyalty to the squadrons, summer courses were offered at RCAF stations, and a flying scholarship course was developed.[11] To date, more than 15,000 cadets have received their private pilot licence through this scholarship course.[11] Training shifted to be focused on the development of citizenship and an interest in aviation.[11] Interest was renewed; by 1961, 332 squadrons were in existence and in 1972, authority was given for membership of up to 28,000 cadets.[11]

With the unification of the Royal Canadian Navy,the Canadian Army and the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1968, the Canadian Forces became the Air Cadet League's military partner in the delivery of air cadet training.[12] In 1975, legislation was changed to officially allow the enrolment of female cadets into the Royal Canadian Sea, Army, and Air Cadets.[4]

Today, the Royal Canadian Air Cadets has a membership of approximately 26,000 in 450 squadrons; and together with the Royal Canadian Sea Cadets and Royal Canadian Army Cadets, forms the "largest federally-funded youth program in the country".[2][6] The membership has also diversified, becoming gender balanced and attracting and retaining visible minorities.[13]

Funding and military partnership

The RCAirC, along with the Royal Canadian Sea and Army Cadets, is sponsored by the CF/DND and the civilian Air Cadet League, along with the Navy League and Army Cadet League.[1] Each cadet unit is supported by a local sponsoring committee or League branch, responsible to the National League.[14] The basic Air Cadet program is free, including uniforms and activities. The local civilian sponsors must raise money to provide accommodation, liability insurance, and additional training aids not provided by the CF/DND. Cadets and their parents are encouraged to participate in fund-raising activities.[7]

Local training

An Air Cadet squadron marching.

Each squadron trains one night per week — a "parade night" — to undertake the local training program. The course of instruction is prescribed by the Director of Cadets and outlined in course training plans distributed to each squadron.[15] The four year program provides cadets instruction in citizenship, leadership, survival training, instructional techniques, drill and ceremonial and the basics of aviation and aeronautics.[16] In the fifth and subsequent years, cadets may be assigned to instruct these classes to the younger cadets. The local training begins in September and continues until June.

In addition to the mandatory weekly training sylabus, there are additional regularly scheduled activities that cadets can participate in optional training that includes band, firearms safety and marksmanship using the 10 m Air Rifle for both training and competition, biathlon, military drill practice, first aid training and competitions,[17] and ground school instruction in preparation for gliding and flying scholarship courses. Many of these activities also involve regional, provincial, or national competitions between teams and individual cadets.

Throughout the year there are weekend exercises organized by the local squadrons. Survival exercises, participation in Remembrance Day ceremonies, and familiarization flights are all common activities. Cadet squadrons participate in community events such as parades and band concerts.[18][19]

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Squadron training levels

Air Cadets are challenged to qualify to five training levels. Each level is normally completed in the ten-month training period from September to June. With the approval of the commanding officer, cadets 14 years of age and older may complete levels 1 and 2 in a single training year. Success in meeting the required standard is rewarded with the appropriate level qualification badge. In Level Four cadets learn to instruct so that when they reach Level Five, they are ready to teach other cadets. This chart displays the training level structure of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets.

Cadet program update - squadron training

Beginning with the 2008/2009 training year, a new training system was introduced replacing the program that was in use since 1992. The Cadet Program Update (CPU) brings new teaching materials and incorporates more contemporary educational and youth development methods. Similar updates to the Sea and Army Cadet programs rationalize the connectivity between the three programs and more efficiently provides the training that is common to all three elements.[20]

The cornerstone of the CPU is the recognition that people between the ages of 12-18 pass through three basic "Developmental Periods" (DPs). These DPs mark the development of their cognitive abilities from a purely experienced-based (i.e. "hands-on") method of learning to abstract problem-solving and competency. The training methods used at each training level reflect the target age group of the cadets in that training level.[21]

The delivery of the various performance objectives (POs) will be through a mixture of mandatory and complementary enabling objectives (EOs). The mandatory EOs will be the same for all air cadet squadrons. Individual squadrons may chose from a number of complementary EOs to support the mandatory training. The selection of complementary training activities at a local squadron is based on the local resources and the interests of the cadets involved.[22]

The program will be phased in one year at a time with the new Level 5 being introduced for the 2012/2013 training year. Cadets already undergoing training in the current system will complete their training under the outgoing system.

Levels of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets - Junior Cadets
Level One (CPU) Level Two (CPU) Level Three
To achieve Level One a cadet must satisfactorily complete the following first year performance objectives:
Worn on the lower left sleeve
  • PO 101 - Citizenship
  • PO 102 - Community Service
  • PO 103 - Leadership
  • PO 104 - Personal Fitness and Healthy Living
  • PO 105 - Recreational Sports
  • PO 106 - Marksmanship
  • PO 107 - Cadet General Knowledge
  • PO 108 - Drill
  • PO 120 - Canadian Forces Familiarization
  • PO 121 - Canadian Aviation, Aerospace and Aerodrome Operations Community Familiarization
  • PO 129 - Radio Communication
  • PO 130 - Aviation Activities
  • PO 140 - Aerospace Activities
  • PO 160 - Aerodrome Operations Activities
  • PO 190 - Aircrew Survival
  • Cadet Harassment and Abuse Prevention Program
To achieve Level Two a cadet must satisfactorily complete the following second year performance objectives:
Worn on the lower left sleeve
  • PO 201 - Citizenship
  • PO 202 - Community Service
  • PO 203 - Leadership
  • PO 204 - Personal Fitness and Healthy Living
  • PO 205 - Recreational Sports
  • PO 206 - Marksmanship
  • PO 207 - Cadet General Knowledge
  • PO 208 - Drill
  • PO 211 - Biathlon (optional)
  • PO 230 - Canadian Aviation History
  • PO 231 - Principles of Flight
  • PO 232 - Characteristics of Piston-Powered Aircraft
  • PO 240 - Aerospace Activities
  • PO 260 - Aerodrome Operations Activities
  • PO 270 - Aircraft Manufacturing & Maintenance
  • PO 190 - Aircrew Survival
  • Cadet Harassment and Abuse Prevention Program
To achieve Level Three a cadet must satisfactorily complete the following third year performance objectives
Worn on the lower left sleeve
  • PO 401 - Drill
  • PO 402 - Drill Instruction
  • PO 403 - Cadet General Knowledge
  • PO 404 - Citizenship
  • PO 405 - Physical Fitness
  • PO 406 - Sensible Living
  • PO 408 - Leadership
  • PO 409 - Instructional Techniques
  • PO 416 - Propulsion
  • PO 417 - Navigation
  • PO 418 - Radio Procedures
  • PO 419 - Aircrew Survival

Note: To be replaced in the 2010/2011 training year with CPU Level 3

Levels of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets - Senior Cadets
Level Four Level Five Onwards
To achieve Level Four a cadet must satisfactorily complete the following fourth year performance objectives
Worn on the lower left sleeve
  • PO 401 - Drill
  • PO 402 - Drill Instruction
  • PO 404 - Citizenship
  • PO 405 - Physical Fitness
  • PO 406 - Sensible Living
  • PO 408 - Leadership
  • PO 409 - Instructional Techniques
  • PO 413 - Meteorology
  • PO 417 - Navigation
  • PO 419 - Aircrew Survival
  • PO 420 - Training Support

Note: To be replaced in 2011/2012 training year with CPU Level 4

To achieve Level Five a cadet must satisfactorily complete the following fifth year performance objectives
Worn on the lower left sleeve
  • PO 400 - Intro to Administration and Supply
  • PO 401 - Drill
  • PO 408 - Leadership
  • On the Job Training (OJT)

Note: To be replaced in 2012/2013 training year with CPU Level 5

* Cadets who have completed Level Five are often assigned responsibilities to help administer the squadron including assisting in clothing stores, squadron administration, training coordination and instruction
  • There are no further badges awarded beyond Level Five

Summer training

Over 10,000 Air Cadets take part in summer training, delivered at summer training centres across the country. The courses offered are divided into familiarization, introductory specialty, and advanced specialty courses.

Introductory courses

The two-week long General Training course cadets attend classes in citizenship, aviation, and military drill. They also do a variety of sports and participate in citizenship tours. Their training is meant to supplement the training received during the first year as a cadet.[23] Two other introductory courses are Cadet Musician - Basic and Pipes and Drums - Basic.

Introductory specialty courses

The introductory specialty courses deliver training directed more specifically towards certain specialties. The Introduction to Instruction Course course prepares cadets for senior teaching roles within their home squadron. The Introduction to Leadership Course course prepares cadets for junior leadership roles within their home squadron.[24] The Introduction to Survival Course course introduces cadets to basic survival skills through instruction and situational training.[24] Introduction to Aviation expands on the aviation subjects that cadets are taught at the Squadron during the winter. It covers both the theoretical and practical aspects of flight. Introduction to Physical Education & Recreational Training develops attributes of sportsmanship and teamwork needed for assisting in the delivery of physical fitness programs at their home squadron.[24] The Introduction to Aerospace course is designed to instruct cadets on the development of space including scientific aspects, technical aspects, human aspects, as well as space exploration. The Introduction to Rifle Coaching course has two objectives, the first being to advance marksmanship skills and the second to teach how to coach fellow cadets during range activities in their local squadron. Cadets are given knowledge and practical experience in instructional techniques at the Introduction to Instruction course. One other introductory specialty course is Cadet Musician.

Advanced specialty courses

Cadets may receive their glider pilot licence through a Gliding Scholarship course offered by the Air Cadet program. In Canada, the majority of glider pilots licenses are earned by Royal Canadian Air Cadets.[25] Cadets must be 16 to hold a Glider Pilot Licence.

Air Cadet Power Wings

Additionally, 250 air cadets earn their Transport Canada Private Pilot Licence through the Air Cadet Flying Scholarship program each year. This scholarship is available to cadets aged 17 to 18. Cadets are selected for this scholarship based on their cadet performance, academic performance, a written examination, a narrative, and an interview. The Survival Instructor Course gives cadets further training in wilderness survival techniques and instruction. The Athletic Instructor course teaches cadets instruction and leadership in the domain of physical training. Other advanced specialty courses are Technical Training (Airport Operations, Photography, or Aircraft Maintenance), Service Band, Pipes and Drums, and the International Air Cadet Exchange.

Senior Leaders Course (SLC)

Senior Leaders Course (commonly referred to as SLC) is an advanced specialty course held in Cold Lake, Alberta. The six-week course trains approximately 300 senior cadets each summer in advanced leadership techniques and ceremonial drill.

Senior Leader Course cadets have an opportunity to try out to be a member of the Precision Drill Team (PDT). The drill team consists of forty-eight cadets who perform a five-minute 'freestyle' drill routine involving complex movements and formations. For about a month, the cadets practice the routine in secret and reveal it to the Wing at the graduation parade. The Air Force Association Medal is awarded during graduation to one cadet from each province/territory who has the top overall performance in leadership and deportment, uniform, and drill.

After successfully completing a summer course, cadets are presented with a qualification badge to display on their uniform. The badges may be seen on the Cadets.ca website.[26]

Summer training centres (CSTCs)

Sunset at Penhold Air Cadet Summer Training Centre

The cadet summer training centres (CSTC) of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets are distributed across Canada, often co-located with a Canadian Forces base. CFB Greenwood was opened in 1951.[27] In 1966, Cadet Summer Training Centre (CSTC) Penhold was opened at Penhold, Alberta.[28] Albert HeadAir Cadet Summer Training Centre, British Columbia was established in 1995.[29]

Other summer training centres used by Air Cadets are at CFB Bagotville, CFB Comox, Blackdown (at CFB Borden, Ontario), CSTC Cold Lake (Alberta), CSTC Connaught in Ontario, Sea Cadet Summer Training Centre (SCSTC) HMCS Acadia in Nova Scotia, SCSTC HMCS Ontario, SCSTC HMCS Quebec, Rocky Mountain National Army CSTC, CSTC Trenton, CSTC Valcartier, and CSTC Whitehorse in the Yukon. Most summer training centres host a mix of Air, Army, and Sea Cadets during the summers. There are five regional gliding schools dedicated to the training of cadets receiving the gliding scholarship course.[30] They are located in Nova Scotia, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, and British Columbia.[30]

As of the transition to the new program in the 2012/2013 training year, the summer training courses varies from year to year.[31]

Summer training courses (2010)

Proficiency Level Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5+
Leadership General
Training
(GTC)
2 weeks
Basic Leadership (BLC)
3 weeks
Senior Leaders Course*** (SLC) - 6 weeks
Flying Basic Aviation (BAC)
3 weeks
Glider Pilot Scholarship** (GPS) - 6 weeks
Power Pilot Scholarship* (PPS) - 7 weeks
Fitness/Sports Basic Fitness & Sports (BFSC)
3 weeks
Athletic Instructor (AIC) - 6 weeks
Survival Basic Survival (BSC)
3 weeks
Survival Instructor (SIC) - 6 weeks
Military Band Military Band
Basic Musician (MB-BMC)
3 weeks
Music Course
  • Levels 1-3(ML123C)
  • Levels 4-5 (ML45C) - 6 weeks
Pipe Band Pipe Band
Basic Musician (PB-BMC)
3 weeks
Pipes & Drums Course
  • Levels 1-3 (PDL123C)
  • Levels 4-5 (PDL45C)- 6 weeks
Aerospace Basic Aviation Technology
and Aerospace (BATAC)
3 weeks
Introduction to Aerospace (ITASC) - 3 weeks
Technology Advanced Aviation Technology Courses - 6 weeks
  • Airport Operations (AATC-AO)
  • Aircraft Maintenance (AATC-AM)
Marksmanship Introduction to Rifle Coaching (ITRCC) - 3 weeks
Exchanges/Trips Oshkosh Trip
International Air Cadet Exchange
Staff Cadet Staff Cadet

* A prerequisite for the Power Pilot Scholarship is that cadets must be 17 years old before 1 September of the year of the course.
** A prerequisite for the Glider Pilot Scholarship is that cadets must be 16 years old before 1 September of the year of the course.

*** A prerequisite for the Senior Leadership Course is that cadets must be 15 1/2 years old before 1 January of the year of the course.

Flying

The Schweizer SGS 2-33 (2-33A), used for training in the Air Cadet Gliding Program

Throughout the spring and fall approximately 22,000 air cadets participate in familiarization gliding at regional gliding centres located across the country.[32] Each summer, 320 cadets earn a Transport Canada Glider Pilot Licence through the Air Cadet Gliding Scholarship and 250 more earn a Private Pilot licence.[33][34] The Air Cadet Gliding Program conducts approximately 60,000 glider flights annually in Schweizer SGS 2-33 and 2-33A gliders.[35][35] The aircraft fleet used by gliding program is owned by the Air Cadet League of Canada. The fleet, consisting of more than 100 gliders and tow planes is maintained by the Canadian Forces under a memorandum of understanding. Canadian Forces pilots and Civilian Instructors operate the fleet to train cadets.[5]

Aircraft
Make/Model Type Manufacturer Origins
Schweizer SGS 2-33 Glider Schweizer Aircraft  United States
Schweizer SGS 2-33A Glider Schweizer Aircraft  United States

Ranks

Upon enrollment a new cadet in the Air Cadet Program is known as an "Air Cadet" (AC). Appointment (or promotion) to higher ranks occurs after the cadet has met certain nationally prescribed standards, and in some cases, additional standards prescribed by the local squadron. Since there is no maximum establishment for the ranks of Leading Air Cadet (LAC), Corporal, Flight Corporal, Sergeant and Flight Sergeant promotions to these ranks are based on national standards only and the cadet is automatically promoted when these standards are met.

Because there is a maximum number of established positions for ranks Warrant Officer First Class, promotions are based on the results of a merit review board. The composition of the merit review board shall include a minimum of three to a maximum of five members. As appointed by the squadron Commanding Officer, members shall include: Commanding Officer (or delegate) acting as Board Chairperson; Air Cadet League or local sponsor representative; and a minimum of one and maximum of three additional members from the following: representative(s) of the RCSU CO (Area Cadet Instructor Cadre Officer, Regional Cadet Advisor, Area Cadet Officer, etc.), Squadron CIC Officer(s) (from within own or members of neighbouring corps/sqns), and member(s) of the community (to include: school principal, Legion member, etc.).[36]

Cadets may be appointed to acting ranks where there is a shortage of available candidates or there is a cadet of exceptional ability. The acting rank is temporary only and the cadet has until the beginning of the next training year to complete all prerequisites for promotion to have the promotion become substantive. Cadets failing to meet the prerequisites by the deadline revert to their previously held substantive rank. A cadet may not be promoted to the same acting rank twice. In all cases, the squadron commanding officer is the final authority for all promotions within the squadron.[37]

Responsibilities are given to cadets upon reaching the first NCO rank. Formerly it was the rank of Corporal, but in September 2007, the rank of "flight corporal" was introduced, becoming the new first NCO rank. The badge is similar to the insignia of a flight sergeant incorporating a crown above two chevrons.[38] The new rank brought the rank progression for the sea, army, and air cadet programs into line. Flight corporals generally assistant a more senior cadet — such as a flight sergeant who leads a flight (a small, organizational group of cadets). Sergeants are responsible for most of the day-to-day activities of the squadron and assist the flight sergeants as second in command of a flight. Warrant Officers work closely with the officer staff of the squadron, assisting with administration, logistical, leadership, and training. In smaller squadrons, these roles may be filled by more junior cadets.

The official phrasing for the ranks uses the word "Cadet" as a preface — as an example, Cadet Corporal. However, custom omits "Cadet" in casual reference.[3] Thus, Corporal is the usual wording. Generally, where there is a need to distinguish between cadets and Canadian Forces members, ranks will be written or spoken as Cadet Corporal and abbreviated as C/Cpl.

While it is customary within the organization to refer to a cadet receiving a rank as being "promoted," the official documentation (Queens Rules and Regulations (Cadets) and CATO) vary: the senior document describing progression as an "appointment", the other describing progression as "promotion".

This chart displays the rank structure of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets.[39]

Ranks of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets - Junior Cadets
Air Cadet Leading Air Cadet - Cadet de l'Air 1ière classe
  • Upon enrolment - must be minimum 12 years of age;
  • No rank badges worn.
For promotion to Leading Air Cadet (LAC) a cadet must:
Worn on the upper sleeves
  • Actively participate in the proficiency level 1 of the LHQ training program for a minimum period of five months.
Ranks of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets - Non-Commissioned Officers (NCO)
Corporal - Caporal Flight Corporal - Caporal de Section
For promotion to Corporal (Cpl) a cadet must:
Worn on the upper sleeves
  • Hold the rank of LAC;
  • Successfully complete year one of the proficiency level training program.
For promotion to Flight Corporal (FCpl), a cadet must:
Worn on the upper sleeves
  • Complete at least six months service at the rank of Cpl;
  • Have successfully completed the second year of the proficiency level training program.
Sergeant - Sergent Flight Sergeant - Sergent de Section
For promotion to Sergeant (Sgt), a cadet must:
Worn on the upper sleeves
  • Complete at least six months service at the rank of FCpl;
  • Have successfully completed the third year of the proficiency level training program; and
  • Be recommended by the appropriate flight commander.
For promotion to Flight Sergeant (FSgt), a cadet must:
Worn on the upper sleeves
  • Complete at least six months service at the rank of Sgt;
  • Have successfully completed the fourth year of the proficiency level training

Program;

  • Have achieved enhanced proficiency in most subject areas including leadership and instructional techniques; and
  • Be recommended by the appropriate flight commander.
Ranks of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets - Warrant Officers
Warrant Officer 2nd Class - Adjudant 2ième classe Warrant Officer 1st Class - Adjudant 1ière classe
For promotion to Warrant Officer Second Class (WO2), a cadet must:
Worn on the lower sleeve
  • Completed at least six months service at the substantive rank of FSgt; and
  • Be identified as a successful candidate through the merit review board process.
For promotion to Warrant Officer 1st Class (WO1), a cadet must:
Worn on the lower sleeve
  • Completed at least six months service at the substantive rank of WO2; and
  • Be identified as a successful candidate through the merit review board process.

Music appointments

Cadet bands are led by cadets holding the appointment of drum major or, in the case of pipe and drum bands, a pipe major and a drum major. The pipe major is responsible for song selection and other musical aspects of the band with the drum major being responsible for drill, dress and discipline. The appointments are made at the discretion of the Squadron Commanding Officer often with the recommendations of the Band and Training Officers. Unlike other cadet appointments, there is no rank or training prerequisites for drum major or pipe major.

Music Appointments
Drum Major Pipe Major
Drum Major Badge
  • Appointed at the discretion of the Squadron Commanding Officer;
  • Is independent of rank;
  • No music or squadron training prerequisite for this position;
  • Badge is removed when cadet no longer fills the appointment;
  • Worn on mid-upper sleeve for Warrant Officers and lower sleeve for all other ranks
  • Only one cadet in a squadron can be appointed Drum Major.
Pipe Major Badge
  • Appointed at the discretion of the Squadron Commanding Officer;
  • Is independent of rank;
  • No music or squadron training prerequisite for this position;
  • Badge is removed when cadet no longer fills the appointment;
  • Worn on mid-upper sleeve for Warrant Officers and lower sleeve for all other ranks
  • Only one cadet in a squadron can be appointed Pipe Major.

Medals

Air Cadets have the opportunity to be awarded any of the six medals. Medals are awarded for outstanding service or contribution as recommended by the cadets Commanding Officer. The Cadet Service Medal is earned by all cadets after four years of "honourable service with no serious infractions."

Medals of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets
Cadet Medal for Bravery Lord Strathcona Medal Royal Canadian Legion
Cadet Medal of Excellence
Worn on the left upper pocket

The Cadet Medal for Bravery is awarded for acts of bravery in hazardous circumstances. It is also given in recognition of outstanding deed of valour, involving risk of his or her life, in attempting to save the life or property of another person.[40]

Worn on the left upper pocket

The Lord Strathcona Medal is awarded for recognition of exemplary performance in physical and military training.[41]

Worn on the left upper pocket

The Royal Canadian Legion Cadet Medal of Excellence recognizes individual endeavours of a citizenship nature which meet or enhance the aims and objectives of the cadet organizations.[42]

Air Force Association Medal (Air Cadets) Army, Navy and Air Force Veterans in Canada
Cadet Medal of Merit
Air Cadet Service Medal
Worn on the left upper pocket

The Air Force Association Medal (Air Cadets) recognizes one air cadet in each province who achieves outstanding excellence at the Senior Leaders Course (SLC).[43]

Worn on the left upper pocket

The Army, Navy and Air Force Veterans in Canada Cadet Medal of Merit recognizes the top cadet at on the Air Traffic Control, Technical Training (all three disciplines), Athletic Instructor, Survival Instructor, Music (Levels 3/4/5) and Pipes & Drums (Levels 3/4/5), as well as the Glider Pilot Scholarship, and Power Pilot Scholarship Air Cadet Courses.[44]

Worn on the left upper pocket

The Air Cadet Service Medal recognizes all air cadets who have completed four years of honourable service with no serious infractions.[45]

Symbols

Flags

Royal Canadian Air Cadet Banner

Royal Canadian Air Cadet Banner

The RCAirC Banner is flown only on important ceremonial occasions to indicate the presence of a formed body of cadets, and, at the end of useful life, is deposited, after the manner of colours, in some suitable location. Currently, the banner is paraded only during the Senior Leadership Course graduation parade in August of each year. The Banner was presented in 1991 at the Senior Leadership School at CFB Cold Lake, and is paraded at the Senior Leaders Course graduation parades each summer. Though not consecrated, this flag parallels Air Force Command Colours and is carried in the same manner.[46] Cadets pay compliments to the Banner in a similar manner to a consecrated colour. Members of the CF are not required to pay compliments to the Banner but may do so as a courtesy.[47]

Royal Canadian Air Cadet Ensign

Royal Canadian Air Cadet Ensign

Originally approved in 1941, the RCAirC Ensign was modified in 1971 to incorporate the National Flag in the canton. This flag parallels a Canadian Forces command flag (as distinct from a Command Colour).[46] The ensign is normally flown at the Squadron and often carried as part of a flag party. It is always flown from a mast or pole at RCAirC summer training centres.

Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron Banner

Squadron Banner

The Squadron Banner parallels an Air Force Squadron Standard and is carried by squadrons as their specific unit identifier. Unlike a Squadron Standard, however, an Air Cadet Squadron Banner may not be consecrated nor can they emblazoned with battle honours. Though Squadron Banners may not be consecrated they may, be dedicated and may be laid up in a manner paralleling similar ceremonies for Squadron Standards. Compliments are paid to the Squadron Banner in the same manner as the RCAirC Banner.[47]

Based on a standard Banner design (shown on the right), the squadron's name and number are embroidered in place of "Squadron Banner" and "000."[46]. It should be noted, however, that the Air Cadet League did for a brief period allow the acquisition of Squadron Banners featuring the individual squadron's badge in place of standard design. It is unclear, should any of these banners require replacement, if anything other than the standard design will be authorized.

Flag parties

In some squadrons, the Ensign and Squadron Banner are carried by a flag party with the Canadian flag (see image in the Local training section above), despite Canadian Forces custom being for one- or two-flag parties only. Subject to regional regulations, flag party escorts may carry deactivated drill purpose rifles.

Badge

Badge of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets

The emblem of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets consists of a circle surrounded by a wreath of maple leaves, superimposed with a flying falcon, the head to the sinister (left). The whole is crowned by the Royal crown — fashioned as a St. Edward's Crown — to symbolise the Canadian Monarch as the Cadets' source of authority. This all rests on a scroll displaying the words "Royal Canadian Air Cadets/Cadets de l'aviation royale du Canada". It is worn as a brass or embroidered badge on the left side of the wedge cap and other formal headdress, and as an embroidered patch on the all-weather jacket.

Notable former air cadets

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Memorandum of Understanding between the Department of National Defence and the Air Cadet League of Canada" (PDF). 2005-12-01. http://www.aircadetleague.com/pdf/mou_e.pdf. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  2. ^ a b "Backgrounder: The Canadian Cadet Organizations" (PDF). Department of National Defence (Canada). 1999-12-06. http://www.cadets.ca/media/bg/bg_CCO99_e.pdf. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  3. ^ a b c "Level one Air Cadet training handbook (7.7 MB)" (PDF). Department of National Defence (Canada). 1998-07-01. http://www.cadets.ca/_docs/air/hdbk1_e.pdf. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
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  7. ^ a b "National Defence Cadet Website: About - Program overview". Department of National Defence (Canada). 2006-09-06. http://www.cadets.ca/about-nous/overview_e.asp. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
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  9. ^ "National Defence Act". Department of Justice (Canada). 2007-03-19. http://lois.justice.gc.ca/en/ShowFullDoc/cs/N-5///en. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  10. ^ a b "The Air Cadet Story: The Early Days". The Air Cadet League of Canada (Manitoba). http://www.aircadetleague.com/manitoba/story.html. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  11. ^ a b c d "The Air Cadet Story: The Post-War Period". The Air Cadet League of Canada (Manitoba). http://www.aircadetleague.com/manitoba/story2.html. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  12. ^ "The Air Cadet Story: The Post-Unification Years". The Air Cadet League of Canada (Manitoba). http://www.aircadetleague.com/manitoba/story3.html. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  13. ^ Srikanthan, Thulasi (2005-08-04). "'A lot fewer white people': Once pale and male, the cadet corps is diversifying". MacLean's. http://www.macleans.ca/canada/national/article.jsp?content=20050801_110153_110153. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  14. ^ "National Defence Cadet Website: About - Partnership". Department of National Defence (Canada). 2004-03-04. http://www.cadets.ca/about-nous/partnr/intro_e.asp. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  15. ^ "National Defence Cadet Website: Air Cadet Course Training Standards and Plans". Department of National Defence (Canada). 2004-07-20. http://www.cadets.ca/support/trg-instr/3_e.asp. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  16. ^ "National Defence Cadet Website: About - Air Cadets". Department of National Defence (Canada). 2004-10-22. http://www.cadets.ca/about-nous/air_e.asp. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  17. ^ Topf, Andrew (2007-05-09). "Cadets top the field at First Aid contest". Goldstream News Gazette. http://www.goldstreamgazette.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=12&cat=43&id=980426&more=. Retrieved 2007-05-19. 
  18. ^ Mandel, Michelle (2007-04-12). "'I had to be here'". Toronto Sun. http://torontosun.com/News/Canada/2007/04/12/3991734-sun.html. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  19. ^ Henderson, Paul (2007-03-16). "Strike up the band". Chilliwack Times. http://www.chilliwacktimes.com/issues07/033207/entertainment.html. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  20. ^ Capt Catherine Griffin (Spring/Summer 2006). "Cadet Program Update - What You Really Want to Know!" (PDF). Cadence (Issue 19). http://www.cadets.ca/_docs/cadence/2006-1/PDF/f10-cadet-prog-update_e.pdf. Retrieved 2007-06-30. 
  21. ^ Capt Catherine Griffin (Winter 2006). "Age-appropriate learning" (PDF). Cadence (Issue 21). http://www.cadets.ca/_docs/cadence/cadence-2006-3_e.pdf. Retrieved 2007-06-30. 
  22. ^ "Royal Canadian Air Cadets Proficiency Level One - Qualification Standard and Plan, Chapter 2" (PDF). Department of National Defence (Canada). 2007-01-01. http://www.cadets.ca/_docs/CPU/ACRCCP801PG001_E070101A%20Reduced.pdf. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  23. ^ "National Defence Cadet Website: Familiarization Course Descriptions". Department of National Defence (Canada). 2004-05-05. http://www.regions.cadets.ca/pac/aircad/summer/summer_introcourses_e.asp. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
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  25. ^ "Transport Canada quarterly licencing statistics". Transport Canada. 2007-01-15. http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/general/personnel/stats/stats006.htm. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  26. ^ "Air Cadet Symbols". Department of National Defence (Canada). http://www.cadets.forces.gc.ca/aircad/resources-ressources/symbols/air_pages_all/air_summer.html. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  27. ^ "National Cadet Website: The History of the Greenwood Air Cadet Summer Training Centre". Department of National Defence (Canada). 2004-02-27. http://www.regions.cadets.forces.gc.ca/atl/gacstc/history_e.asp. Retrieved 2007-05-24. 
  28. ^ "History of Penhold Air Cadet Summer Training Centre". http://www.armycadethistory.com/Penhold/penhold_History.htm. Retrieved 2007-05-24. 
  29. ^ "National Cadet Website: Albert Head". Department of National Defence (Canada). 2006-07-10. http://www.cadets.net/pac/alberthead/general_info_e.asp. Retrieved 2007-05-24. 
  30. ^ a b "BC Air Cadets unveil brand new tow plane". Department of National Defence (Canada). 2007-01-30. http://www.airforce.forces.gc.ca/newsroom/news_e.asp?id=1497. Retrieved 2007-05-24. 
  31. ^ http://cms.cadets.gc.ca/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=56967
  32. ^ "National Defence Cadet Website: Air Cadets - Gliding". Department of National Defence (Canada). 2004-09-08. http://www.cadets.ca/aircad/gliding-planeur/intro_e.asp. Retrieved 2007-05-28. 
  33. ^ "National Defence Cadet Website: Air Cadets - Gliding Scholarships". Department of National Defence (Canada). 2005-04-12. http://www.cadets.ca/aircad/gliding-planeur/3_e.asp. Retrieved 2007-05-28. 
  34. ^ "National Defence Cadet Website: Air Cadets - Power Flying". Department of National Defence (Canada). 2004-09-08. http://www.cadets.ca/aircad/power-motorise/intro_e.asp. Retrieved 2007-05-28. 
  35. ^ a b "National Defence Cadet Website: Air Cadets - The Glider". Department of National Defence (Canada). 2004-09-08. http://www.cadets.ca/aircad/gliding-planeur/4_e.asp. Retrieved 2007-05-28. 
  36. ^ "Cadet Administrative Training Orders 13-02" (PDF). Department of National Defence (Canada). 2008-10-01. http://www.cadets.net/_docs/cato-oaic/1302_b.pdf. Retrieved 2009-01-29. 
  37. ^ "Cadet Administrative Training Orders 51-02" (PDF). Department of National Defence (Canada). 2007-03-01. http://www.cadets.ca/_docs/cato-oaic/5102_b.pdf. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  38. ^ "Cadet Administrative and Training Orders 51-2" (PDF). Department of National Defence (Canada). 2007-03-01. http://www.cadets.ca/_docs/cato-oaic/5102_b.pdf. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  39. ^ http://www.cadets.net/support/cato-oaic/intro_e.asp?cato=13-02
  40. ^ "Cadets - Bravery". http://www.cyberbeach.net/army/bravery.html. Retrieved July 18, 2008. 
  41. ^ "Cadets - Lord Strathcona Medal". http://www.cyberbeach.net/army/lsm.html. Retrieved July 18, 2008. 
  42. ^ "Cadets - Royal Canadian Legion Cadet Medal of Excellence". http://kilby.sac.on.ca/ActivitiesClubs/cadets/ThingsToKnow/LegMedEx.html. Retrieved July 18, 2008. 
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  44. ^ "Air Cadet League - Army, Navy, and Air Force Veterans in Canada Cadet Medal of Merit" (PDF). http://www.aircadetleague.on.ca/bulletins/bulletin%202003%2006%20summer.pdf. Retrieved July 20, 2008. 
  45. ^ "Air Cadet League - Air Cadet Service Medal". http://www.aircadetleague.com/News/press_release_110605_e.html. Retrieved July 20, 2008. 
  46. ^ a b c Department of National Defence (2001-01-05). A-AD-200-000/AG-000 The Honours, Flags and Heritage Structure of the Canadian Forces Chap 4 Annex A. Directorate of History and Heritage. 
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  48. ^ Major Carlo DeCiccio (Summer 2001). "Renowned 'DJ' is former air cadet" (PDF). Cadence (Issue 2). http://www.cadets.ca/_docs/Cadence/Cadence-2001-2_e.pdf. Retrieved 2008-08-30. 
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  52. ^ http://www.forces.gc.ca/site/about-notresujet/bio/Gen-Walt-Natynczyk-eng.asp

External links


Simple English

The Royal Canadian Air Cadets is a program for Canadian youth. It is supported by sponsors in the community and Canada's Canadian Forces funded by the Department of National Defence. There are about 450 Air Cadet squadrons in every province and territory in Canada. The two other cadet programs for youth in Canada are the Royal Canadian Sea Cadets and the Royal Canadian Army Cadets. People between the ages of 12 and 18 can join this program for free, and they are led by the officers of the Canadian Forces Cadet Instructor Cadre.

=Aims and Motto

= The aim of the Air Cadets is to "develop in youth the attributes of good citizenship and leadership; promote physical fitness; and to stimulate the interest of youth in the sea, land and air activities of the Canadian Forces."

Ranking

The rank system in Air Cadets is founded in that ranking system used by the former Royal Canadian Air Force with some modifications. Royal Canadian Air Cadets are not part of the Canadian Forces and do not have to join the Canadian forces.

1) Air Cadet (AC)- When people first join Air Cadets, they get the rank of an Air Cadet.

2) Leading Air Cadet (LAC)- After someone joins and often takes part in the Air Cadet training for five months, they hold the rank of a leading Air Cadet.

3) Corporal A corporal is a non-commissioned officer. To become a corporal, an air cadet has to be a Leading Air Cadet (LAC) first, and finish Level 1 of Air Cadets successfully.

4) Flight Corporal A new rank recently introduced in Sept 2007 as the first earned position of the chain of command. It is required that you have received the rank of corporal and successfully completed level 2.

5) Sergeant To become a sergeant, an Air Cadet to be a flight corporal for at least 6 months and successfully finish Level 2 training in air cadets. It is better is they also complete a Familiarization Summer Course, but a cadet does not have to take this course to become a Sergeant.

6) Flight-Sergeant To become a Flight Sergeant, an Air Cadet must be a sergeant for six months and successfully complete the level three training. They do not have to take and complete a Introductory Speciality Summer Course, but it is not mandatory.

7) Warrant Officer Second Class

8) Warrant Officer First Class

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