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Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Russia article)

From Wikiquote

Russia is a transcontinental country extending over much of northern Eurasia. It is a semi-presidential republic comprising 83 federal subjects. Russia shares land borders with the following countries (counterclockwise from northwest to southeast): Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania (via Kaliningrad Oblast), Poland (via Kaliningrad Oblast), Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia and North Korea. It also borders the Arctic Ocean, the Pacific Ocean, the Caspian Sea, the Baltic Sea, and the Black Sea. Russia is close to the United States (Alaska) and Japan.

Sourced

  • A Frenchman is self-assured because he regards himself personally, both in mind and body, as irresistibly attractive to men and women. An Englishman is self-assured, as being a citizen of the best-organized state in the world, and therefore as an Englishman always knows what he should do and knows that all he does as an Englishman is undoubtedly correct. An Italian is self-assured because he is excitable and easily forgets himself and other people. A Russian is self-assured just because he knows nothing and does not want to know anything, since he does not believe that anything can be known. The German's self-assurance is worst of all, stronger and more repulsive than any other, because he imagines that he knows the truth--science--which he himself has invented but which is for him the absolute truth.
    • Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace, (1865-1869). Book 9, Chapter 10.
  • Let a man find himself, in distinction from others, on top of two wheels with a chain — at least in a poor country like Russia — and his vanity begins to swell out like his tires. In America it takes an automobile to produce this effect.
    • Leon Trotsky, The History of the Russian Revolution (1930). See edition: Leon Trotsky; Max Eastman (1957). The History of the Russian Revolution. University of Michigan Press, p. 213.
  • Complete equality of rights for all nations; the right of nations to self-determination; the unity of the workers of all nations—such is the national program that Marxism, the experience of the whole world, and the experience of Russia, teach the workers.
    • Vladimir Lenin, "The Right of Nations to Self-Determination", reported in Vladimir Lenin; Doug Lorimer (2002). Marxism & Nationalism. Resistance Books, p. 125. ISBN 1876646136.
  • If the Russian word "perestroika" has easily entered the international lexicon, this is due to more than just interest in what is going on in the Soviet Union. Now the whole world needs restructuring, i.e. progressive development, a fundamental change.
    • Mikhail Gorbachev, (1987). Perestroika: New Thinking for Our Country and the World. Harper & Row, p. 254. ISBN 0060390859.
  • Russia has made its choice in favor of democracy. Fourteen years ago, independently, without any pressure from outside, it made that decision in the interests of itself and interests of its people -- of its citizens. This is our final choice, and we have no way back. There can be no return to what we used to have before. And the guarantee for this is the choice of the Russian people, themselves. No, guarantees from outside cannot be provided. This is impossible. It would be impossible for Russia today. Any kind of turn towards totalitarianism for Russia would be impossible, due to the condition of the Russian society.
  • You know, I never planned to leave. I was not extremely patriotic about Mother Russia. You know, I played their game, pretending, of course. You have to deal with, you know, party people, KGB... Horrifying.
  • I think Russian people are learning that democracy is not an alien thing; it's not a western invention. It's probably the most affordable mechanism to solve problems inside the country, inside the society because Putin proved to all of us that democracy has a world of alternatives, security forces and police and power abuse and that's why I think eventually the people of Russia will embrace democracy as the least costly institution to help them to solve their daily problems.
    • Garry Kasparov, statement in interview: Monica Attard (April 3, 2005). "Gary Kasparov", Sunday Profile, Australian Broadcasting Company.
A riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma. ~ Winston Churchill
  • I cannot forecast to you the action of Russia. It is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma; but perhaps there is a key. That key is Russian national interest.

Attributed

  • I live in the USSR, work actively and count naturally on the worker and peasant spectator. If I am not comprehensible to them I should be deported.
    • Dmitri Shostakovich, January 14, 1930, reported in Laurel E. Fay (2000). Shostakovich: A Life. Oxford University Press US, p. 55. ISBN 0195182510.
  • Russia was a slave in Europe but would be a master in Asia.
    • Fyodor Dostoevsky, reported in Dominic Livien (April 1999). "Dilemmas of Empire 1850-1918: Power, Territory, Identity". Journal of Contemporary History 34 (2): p. 180.
  • We do not want a single foot of foreign territory; but of our territory we shall not surrender a single inch to anyone.
    • Joseph Stalin, reported in Sándor Forbát ; Alex Forbath (1938). Europe Into the Abyss: Behind the Scenes of Secret Politics. Pallas Publishing Co., Ltd., p. 462.
  • We bow our heads in respect for those Soviet women who displayed exceptional courage in the severe time of war. Never before but during the days of the war the grandeur of spirit and the invincible will of our Soviet women, their selfless dedication, loyalty and affection to their Homeland, their boundless persistence in work and their heroism on the front manifested themselves with such strength.
    • Leonid Brezhnev, reported in IE IU Kastelli, V karǐni zdiǐsnenoǐ mriǐ (1979) p. 54
  • I could have gone on flying through space forever.
    • Yuri Gagarin, reported in Robin Kerrod, (2004). Dawn of the Space Age. Gareth Stevens, p. 1968. ISBN 0836857127.
  • My arms are up to my elbows in blood. That is the most terrible thing that lies in my soul.
    • Nikita Khrushchev, reported in Melvyn P. Leffler (2007). For the Soul of Mankind: The United States, the Soviet Union, and the Cold War. Macmillan, p. 496. ISBN 0809097176.
  • We don't appreciate what we have until it's gone. Freedom is like that. It's like air. When you have it, you don't notice it.
    • Boris Yeltsin, reported in H. Paul Jeffers, The 100 Greatest Heroes. Citadel Press, p. 60. ISBN 0806524766.
  • I would have preferred to have invented a machine that people could use and that would help farmers with their work - for example, a lawn-mower.
  • In my view, the composer, just as the poet, the sculptor or the painter, is in duty bound to serve Man, the people. He must beautify human life and defend it. He must be a citizen first and foremost, so that his art might consciously extol human life and lead man to a radiant future. Such is the immutable code of art as I see it.
    • Sergei Prokofiev, reported in S. Shlifstein; Rose Prokofieva (2000). Sergei Prokofiev: Autobiography, Articles, Reminiscences. The Minerva Group, Inc., p. 136. ISBN 0898751497.
  • Generalissimo Stalin directed every move ... made every decision ... He is the greatest and wisest military genius who ever lived...
  • In Russia we only had two TV channels. Channel One was propaganda. Channel Two consisted of a KGB officer telling you: Turn back at once to Channel One.
    • Yakov Smirnoff, reported in Bob Fenster (2005). Laugh Off: The Comedy Showdown Between Real Life And The Pros. Andrews McMeel Publishing, p. 101. ISBN 0740754688.

External links


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Russian phrasebook article)

From Wikitravel

.Russian is a Slavic language spoken by 300 million people world-wide.^ The Russian language is used by at least 250 million people and is the fifth most widely spoken language in the world .
  • Professional Instruction in Russian Language, Business and Culture. 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC istolg.com [Source type: News]

^ As the most widely spoken language on the European continent, Russian is a Slavic language that is currently spoken by about 164 million people worldwide.

^ It is spoken by 277 million people and the largest native language in Europe.

.Most people living in Russia use it as a first language, and many other people in Central Asia, the Caucasus, and Eastern Europe know it as a second language.^ Other Languages : Russian, many minority languages   .
  • Russia Facts | Russian Federation Information | Russia Statistics | Russian Empire, Russian Soviet Federative Soc 28 January 2010 0:46 UTC www.phrasebase.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Speakers in Russia use Russian as second language.
  • Ethnologue: Russia, Europe 19 September 2009 0:35 UTC www.christusrex.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Analysis Eastern Europe politics: Russia--losing Central Asia to China?
  • Roubini Global Economics - Russia 28 January 2010 0:46 UTC www.roubini.com [Source type: News]
  • Roubini Global Economics - Russia 28 January 2010 0:46 UTC www.roubini.com [Source type: News]

Pronunciation guide

.Consonants and vowels in Russian (and Slavic generally) are soft (palatalized) or hard.^ The result is that almost every consonant in Russian can be pronounced "hard" or "soft," a distinction which is very difficult for a foreigner to make, as his tendency is to overdo the softness and pronounce a full j after the consonant instead of the palatal element melting into it.
  • Russian Language - LoveToKnow 1911 18 January 2010 8:45 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ R.; however, this new j never broke down the consonant into a palatalized sibilant or affricate, though it had this effect in White Russian (Wh.
  • Russian Language - LoveToKnow 1911 18 January 2010 8:45 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Russian distinguishes between consonant phonemes with palatal secondary articulation and those without, the so-called soft and hard sounds.
  • Russian language - Metapedia 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC en.metapedia.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • � Russian language Review �"; 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.aadet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Russian Language 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC wwp.greenwichmeantime.com [Source type: News]

.Consonants are pronounced soft if followed by a soft vowel or the soft sign, else hard.^ Many Russian consonants form “hard” and “soft” pairs, which are not easy to represent in English.
  • Russian Visa, Russia Vacation Visa, Travel to Russia, Russian passport renewal, Adoption travel arrangaments : Russian Language » 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.russiagateway.com [Source type: Original source]

^ No attempt was made to indicate soft signs, or to show the changes in pronunciation that occur in Russian to vowels that are stressed, as opposed to unstressed, or to show the variant pronunciations of final consonants.
  • Jewish Religious Personnel in the Russian Empire, 1853-1854 18 January 2010 8:45 UTC www.jewishgen.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The alphabet, too, was simplified in form with the latest changes dating from 1918 when the hard sign was omitted at the end of words and one of the vowels was changed to "e."

.Some consonants are always soft or always hard, regardless of the following vowel.^ The speakers do not always follow the exact Power Point presentation; they can add some other information which is not shown on slides.
  • russian language work 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC language123.com [Source type: General]

^ Many Russian consonants form “hard” and “soft” pairs, which are not easy to represent in English.
  • Russian Visa, Russia Vacation Visa, Travel to Russia, Russian passport renewal, Adoption travel arrangaments : Russian Language » 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.russiagateway.com [Source type: Original source]

^ No attempt was made to indicate soft signs, or to show the changes in pronunciation that occur in Russian to vowels that are stressed, as opposed to unstressed, or to show the variant pronunciations of final consonants.
  • Jewish Religious Personnel in the Russian Empire, 1853-1854 18 January 2010 8:45 UTC www.jewishgen.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.One important note: the cursive Russian alphabet looks very different from the printed alphabet.^ Russian One of the most important features of a ...

^ Cursive Russian alphabet .
  • Russian (Cyrillic) alphabet and pronunciation 15 September 2009 2:36 UTC www.omniglot.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ This is a version of the cursive handwritten Russian alphabet.
  • Russian (Cyrillic) alphabet and pronunciation 15 September 2009 2:36 UTC www.omniglot.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The printed alphabet is occasionally used when writing by hand.^ I do not know if you would be able to do this, but if you could develop writing examples for the Russian alphabet, how they are all written by hand, it would greatly help me learn, and hopefully be useful for others attempting to learn your interesting language!
  • Russian language learning 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC obzn.com [Source type: General]

^ For ease of use, the unique identification numbers assigned to the documents are printed in eye-legible type at the top right-hand corner and precede each document on the microfiche strip.
  • The Soviet Estimate: U.S. Analysis of the Soviet Union, 1947-1991 24 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.gwu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ This page will help you set up your computer to read the Cyrillic alphabet which is used in writing and printing Russian.

.The same goes to other Slavic languages.^ There are also links to other Slavic languages.
  • American University Library - Languages and Linguistics: Russian Language and Literature 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.library.american.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ Others may simply wish to gain a working knowledge of Russian or another Slavic language to aid their reading of important material in another field.

^ Russian belongs to the family of Indo-European languages and is one of three living members of the East Slavic languages, the others being Belarusian and Ukrainian.

a ah 
like father
e yeh 
like yet initially, after vowel (except и), ъ or ь; long e elsewhere as in Lenin.
ё yo 
like yore; always stressed; pronounced "o" only after ч, ш, щ and ж.
и ee 
like seen or the i in Machine
o oh 
like score when stressed; when unstressed, it is a hard a in about (syllable before stress) or the o in Gibson (elsewhere).
у oo 
like cartoon
ы yh 
like sit, hit, but pronounced far further down the throat, as if being punched in the stomach
э eh 
like end
ю yoo 
like you or Yugoslavia.
я yah 
like Yard
.The vowels are listed in alphabetical order.^ The museums in this list are given in alphabetical order.
  • WWW Virtual Library : Museums in Russia 28 January 2010 0:46 UTC icom.museum [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Would you rather see the list in alphabetical order?

^ Take me back to [ the alphabetic list ] [ the date-ordered list ].
  • Computer Advances in the Old USSR 23 September 2009 4:25 UTC www.csd.uwo.ca [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Please notice that the vowels also occur in hard/soft pairs: a/я, э/e, o/ё, ы/и, y/ю.^ In Russian, with the Cyrillic alphabet, two complete sets of vowels are used, one to go with the hard consonants, the other with the soft.
  • RUSSIA 18 January 2010 8:45 UTC www.friesian.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Many Russian consonants form “hard” and “soft” pairs, which are not easy to represent in English.
  • Russian Visa, Russia Vacation Visa, Travel to Russia, Russian passport renewal, Adoption travel arrangaments : Russian Language » 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.russiagateway.com [Source type: Original source]

^ No attempt was made to indicate soft signs, or to show the changes in pronunciation that occur in Russian to vowels that are stressed, as opposed to unstressed, or to show the variant pronunciations of final consonants.
  • Jewish Religious Personnel in the Russian Empire, 1853-1854 18 January 2010 8:45 UTC www.jewishgen.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Russian, like English, reduces unstressed vowels, especially the "o" as mentioned above, but the reduction of the other vowels is less dramatic in Russian then it is in English.^ (See also: vowel reduction in Russian .
  • � Russian language Review �"; 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.aadet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Therefore, Russian homeopathy, like it had been in other European countries, was forced to search other ways for the sake of its further development and spreading.
  • Introduction - The history of homeopathy in the Russian Empire -Alexander Kotok, M.D. 18 January 2010 8:45 UTC www.homeoint.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In this, like other Russian fairy > tales, there is only one safe road that can be chosen out > of the three at the crossroads.
  • Marxism message, Russian "Communism" 18 January 2010 8:45 UTC archives.econ.utah.edu [Source type: Original source]

.There are occasional silent letters, but are very rare.^ But there was in fact Soviet jewelry marked with a “585” hallmark (remember this hallmark since it is very rare).
  • JEWELRY OF THE SOVIET UNION - a knol by Tamoikins Museum 24 January 2010 10:46 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

Note: Unfortunately vowel ё very often replaced in writing by е (i.e. without dots above); in such case e means either е itself or ё. .This may be a deadlock for a foreigner, since some russian word have a different meaning depending on е or ё usage.^ Also, Russian has some tricky words.
  • The Russian Language 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.buzzle.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The word means restructuring in Russian.
  • The Balkans 18 January 2010 8:45 UTC www.cotf.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The word is actually means "from" in Russian!
  • Overview of the Russian Language to Help You Learn Russian 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.transparent.com [Source type: Original source]

.Fortunately a special books (like dictionaries, grammars, literature for foreigners etc) are always printed with ё.^ Our tutors experienced professionals specialized to teach Russian as a foreign language with additional qualifications in culture studies, business, science, law etc.

^ In an 1816 bibliography of books printed in Russia up to 1813, Vasilij Sopikov tried to include the preface of the Journey along with its titles, etc.

^ Ludmila Nezvankina graduated from the Moscow State University with a Master's Degree and a specialization in teaching Russian as a Foreign Language and Literature.
  • Study Russian in Russia: Teachers and Methods 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.russian.language.ru [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

б b 
like boy
в v 
like very
г g 
like go; in genitive (possesive) endings ого/его like avoid, e.g., "Dostoevsky's" = Достоевского (duh-stah-YEHV-skuh-vuh)
д d 
like do
ж zh 
like measure; always hard
з z 
like zoo
й y 
like boy
к k 
like keep
л l 
like leak or look
м m 
like seem
н n 
like noodle; pronounced like a Spanish ñ after ь, и-- like the other Slavs-- and e.
п p 
like spigot
р r 
rolled as in Spanish
с s 
like seem
т t 
like tune
ф f 
like French
х kh 
voiceless fricative as in the Scottish loch or German Bach
ц ts 
like boots; always hard
ч ch 
like cheap; always soft
ш sh 
like shot; always hard
щ shch 
similar to sheet; always soft—unlike ш, щ is palatalized
.When consonants are soft (they are either always soft or are soft because they are followed by a soft vowel), they become palatalized.^ Because of that, Russia will probably have a larger Moslem minority by 2050, but not a majority, because even Moslem women have fewer children as they become educated and more affluent.
  • Russia: The Coming Islamic Republic of Russia 28 January 2010 0:46 UTC www.strategypage.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The speakers do not always follow the exact Power Point presentation; they can add some other information which is not shown on slides.
  • russian language work 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC language123.com [Source type: General]

^ Eventually, dissent followed the program of industrialization, I guess because we were becoming corrupt and treating workers badly while paying low wages.

.This means that the consonant is pronounced while sticking the tip of your tongue behind your lower front teeth while raising the middle of your tongue to your palate.^ Palatalization means that the centre of the tongue is raised during and after the articulation of the consonant.

^ Palatalization means that the center of the tongue is raised during and after the articulation of the consonant.
  • � Russian language Review �"; 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.aadet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ These sounds: /t, d, ʦ, s, z, n and rʲ/ are dental, that is pronounced with the tip of the tongue against the teeth rather than against the alveolar ridge.

.Although Russian is pronounced as it is spelt, stress is very unpredictable and stressing the wrong syllable (or even missing a soft/hard sign) CAN lead to misinterpretation; for that reason, almost every book and dictionary concerning the Russian language put an accent on the tonic syllable, so read the phrases carefully, and then try to re-write them by putting an accent mark.^ Etymological dictionary of the Russian language.
  • Russian Language Research and Studies 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.fiu.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ I'm very interested in Russian as a language and Russian history.
  • Colleges With Russian Language Programs - Russian Language 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.for-russia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Re: Russian language .
  • Russian language 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.jv-extensions.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Batavi.org Community Forums • View topic - Russian language 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC forums.batavi.org [Source type: General]
  • G-Lock Software • View topic - Russian language 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.justlan.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

the same rule applies for others that use the Cyrillic script such as Ukrainian and Bulgarian.

Signs

.These used to be vowels (pronounced like the unstressed vowels above), but aren't any more.^ If your students lack experience in dealing with primary sources, you might use one or more preliminary exercises to help them develop these skills.
  • EDSITEment - Lesson Plan 28 January 2010 0:53 UTC edsitement.neh.gov [Source type: Reference]

^ The more revenue that can be raised through the taxation of these rents, the less revenue the government will need to raise by using distortive taxes on goods, factors of production, or asset transactions.
  • Finance & Development September 1998 - Energy Tax Reform in Russia and Other Former Soviet Union Countries 24 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.imf.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Please turn on javascript and reload this page, or use a more current browser (like Firefox ) Share Share Loading...
  • Can you name the countries that were formerly part of the soviet union'? - sporcle 24 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.sporcle.com [Source type: General]

.They indicate whether the preceding consonant is hard or soft.^ No attempt was made to indicate soft signs, or to show the changes in pronunciation that occur in Russian to vowels that are stressed, as opposed to unstressed, or to show the variant pronunciations of final consonants.
  • Jewish Religious Personnel in the Russian Empire, 1853-1854 18 January 2010 8:45 UTC www.jewishgen.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ (Palatalized consonants are those produced with simultaneous movement of the blade of the tongue toward or to the hard palate; they sound as if they have an accompanying y glide and are frequently known as soft consonants.
  • Russian language -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: Reference]

^ The first difficulties arise with the alphabet: Cyrillic consists of 33 letters: 21 consonants, 10 vowels, and two letters without sound - soft sign and hard sign.

ъ ’’ 
hard sign (very rarely used since 1918)
ь ’ 
soft sign

Stress

.There is no fixed stress in Russian, except one case: a syllable with ё is always stressed.^ "There is no Russian (military) attack.
  • Russia posts - Security - CNET News 28 January 2010 0:46 UTC news.cnet.com [Source type: News]

^ There is no knocking in Russian Rummy.
  • Russian Rummy Rules & How To Play 15 September 2009 2:36 UTC rummy.com [Source type: General]

^ Fact#3 There is no true IT in Russian.

.A stressed vowels in a Russian dictionaries are always marked by a acute accent (a kind of diacritical marks), e.g.^ As there are no specific rules for stress in the Russian language, the accent and pronunciation of every word must be learned on an individual basis.
  • Russian - Language Information & Resources 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.alsintl.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Stalin, the hero of Soviet patriots and Russian chauvinists, spoke Russian with a marked Georgian accent.
  • Choices Program 18 January 2010 8:45 UTC www.choices.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Russian pronunciation can be difficult for non-native speakers to master because the accent is free, meaning that the stress may be put on any syllable.
  • Russian - Language Information & Resources 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.alsintl.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

трамва́й.

Grammar

.Unless you intend to seriously study the language, learning Russian grammar on your trip is not realistic.^ Your second language (not mandatory) Russian .
  • How to learn russian language, learn to speak russian, learning russian online, want to learn russian, Russia 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC freshlingua.com [Source type: Original source]

^ You can help other people learn English and get help with learning Russian language.
  • How to learn russian language, learn to speak russian, learning russian online, want to learn russian, Russia 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC freshlingua.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Would you like to study Russian language?
  • USU, Russian language for foreign students 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www2.usu.ru [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.But it can help to at least recognize that the following verb conjugations and noun/adjective declensions are used.^ Thus verbs of the perfect and imperfect kind, adverbs, pronouns, adjectives, participles and verbal adverbs will be actively used in speech.
  • Russian Language Courses 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.rccusa.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Noun and adjective declensions, as well as verbal conjugations, are the basic "building blocks" of Russian grammar, and this course helps students to tie together all the elements of grammar and usage covered up to this point.
  • Russian Language School: Russian Course & Classes - Boston Language Institute 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.bostonlanguage.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Structurally, material covered includes conjugation of verbs, questions about location and direction, adjective endings in the nominative case, the accusative case of personal and interrogative pronouns, past tense, the accusative case of nouns and adjectives derived from nouns.
  • WAL: Russian Classes, Seattle Russian School, Russian Language 15 September 2009 2:36 UTC www.wal.org [Source type: Reference]

  • The second person pronoun вы is the plural of ты and is also used, as in French, for polite address to one person.
  • Russian verbs and verb conjugation differ along three axes:
1) Verbs come in perfective and imperfective pairs (e.g., думать | подумать). .Imperfective verbs indicate ongoing or uncompleted action; Perfective verbs indicated one-off or completed action.^ What is the difference between a perfective and an imperfective verb?

^ Verb endings indicate whether or not the action was completed successfully.

^ Thus verbs of the perfect and imperfect kind, adverbs, pronouns, adjectives, participles and verbal adverbs will be actively used in speech.
  • Russian Language Courses 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.rccusa.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Conjugated perfective verbs are also used to indicated the future tense (future imperfective requires conjugation of the verb to be (быть) + imperfective infinitive).^ Imperfective and perfective verb stems and the future tense are also studied.
  • WAL: Russian Classes, Seattle Russian School, Russian Language 15 September 2009 2:36 UTC www.wal.org [Source type: Reference]

^ Thus verbs of the perfect and imperfect kind, adverbs, pronouns, adjectives, participles and verbal adverbs will be actively used in speech.
  • Russian Language Courses 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.rccusa.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Russian adjectives: agree with nouns in number, gender and case Russian verbs: Infinitive, Aspects, Tenses Russian Pronouns: Personal and Possessive .
  • Russian – Russian Language – Learn Russian online - RusslandJournal.de 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.russlandjournal.de [Source type: General]

.As a general rule (but only a very general rule), perfective verb forms are created by adding a prefix to the relevant imperfective verb.^ Only imperfective verbs may be used to form passives with the suffix -.

^ The Russian verb has two aspects, each represented by a separate infinitive-the imperfective to indicate a continuing action, and the perfective to indicate an action already completed or to be completed.
  • Russian Language Software and Russian Language Products 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC russianlanguage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ No, clearly, governments are the creation of men, and they last only so long as the ruled are willing to submit or the rulers are strong enough to impose.
  • The Millenial Files - A Russian Revolution, 1917 18 January 2010 8:45 UTC www.mmmfiles.com [Source type: Original source]

Singular Plural
1st Person Я думаю Мы думаем
2nd Person Ты думаешь Вы думаете
3rd Person Он думает Они думают
2) Verbs follow a simple pattern of temporal conjugation: past, present, and future, (e.g., подумал | думаю | подумаю). .In the past tense, verbs also conjugate by gender, male, female, and neuter (e.g., подумал | подумала | подумало).^ Russian adjectives: agree with nouns in number, gender and case Russian verbs: Infinitive, Aspects, Tenses Russian Pronouns: Personal and Possessive .
  • Russian – Russian Language – Learn Russian online - RusslandJournal.de 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.russlandjournal.de [Source type: General]

^ Additionally, negative and positive stereotypes can be examined by gender and compared to establish difference in perception held by female Americans and male Americans.
  • Is There Still an Evil Empire? The Role of the Mass Media in DepictingStereotypes of Russians and Eastern Europeans 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC lass.calumet.purdue.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ The verb has three tenses, present, past, and future; in addition it has the category of aspect.
  • Russian Language - MSN Encarta 11 September 2009 10:010 UTC encarta.msn.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

3) Verb conjugation differs by first, second, and third person, as well as singular and plural. (Example at right)

  • Nouns and adjectives have six cases, depending on their general grammatical role in a sentence:
Case Nominative Accusative Genitive Dative Prepositional Instrumental
Use Subject of sentence Direct object Possessive (of) Indirect object (to/for) Location (at) Instrumental (by/with)
Example Город красив Я читал книгу Центр города Я дал ему еду Музей в городе Я шёл с ним
Translation The city is pretty I read the book Center of the city I gave him food A museum in the city I walked with him

Phrase list

See Wikitravel:Pseudo-phoneticization guide for guidance on the phoneticizations below
Hello. 
Здравствуйте. (.ZDRAHST-vooy-tyeh) (Considered bad luck to say this to the same person twice in one day.^ It’s not a moral judgment (bribery and corruption are clearly bad things, and if they can be eliminated, they should), but a business one—American companies will not be able to compete if they can’t play on the same playing field.
  • USSR (Former) Minus Russia | The Agonist 25 January 2010 17:19 UTC agonist.org [Source type: News]

^ It isn’t much to disrupt people’s routine for a day, they always have tomorrow, and the day after that, and the one after, to return to the exact same existence.

^ In those barbarous days, when might made right, murder was too much an every-day matter to be deeply considered by any one.
  • The Baldwin Project: Historical Tales: Russian by Charles Morris 18 January 2010 8:45 UTC www.mainlesson.com [Source type: Original source]

)
Hello. (informal
Привет. (pree-VYEHT)
How are you? 
Как дела? (kahg dee-LAH?)
Fine, thank you. 
Хорошо, спасибо. (khah-rah-SHOH spah-SEE-buh)
What is your name? 
Как Вас зовут? (kahk vahs zah-VOOT?)
My name is ______ . 
Меня зовут ______ . (mee-NYAH zah-VOOT ___)
Nice to meet you. 
Очень приятно. (OH-cheen' pree-YAHT-nuh)
Please. 
Пожалуйста. (pah-ZHAH-luh-stuh)
Thank you. 
Спасибо. (spuh-SEE-buh)
You're welcome. 
Не за что. (NYEH-zuh-shtoh) (Literally "It's nothing", can use "Пожалуйста" again)
Yes. 
Да. (dah)
No. 
Нет. (nyeht)
Excuse me. (getting attention
Извините. (eez-vee-NEET-yeh)
Excuse me. (begging pardon
Простите. (prah-STEET-yeh)
I'm sorry. 
Простите. (prah-STEET-yeh)
Goodbye 
До свидания. (duh svee-DAH-nyah.)
Goodbye (informal
Пока. (pah-KAH)
I can't speak Russian [well]. 
Я не говорю по-русски (хорошо). (yah nee guh-vah-RYOO pah ROO-skee [khah-rah-SHOH])
Do you speak English? 
Вы говорите по-английски? (vyh guh-vah-REE-tyeh pah ahn-GLEES-kee?)
Is there someone here who speaks English? 
Кто-нибудь здесь говорит по-английски? (KTOH-nee-bood' zdyehs guh-vah-REET pah an-GLEES-kee?)
Help! 
Помогите! (puh-mah-GEE-tyeh!)
Look out! 
Осторожно!! (uhs-tah-ROH-zhnuh!)
Good morning. 
Доброе утро. (DOH-bruh-yeh OO-truh)
Good evening. 
Добрый вечер. (DOH-bryh VYEH-chuhr)
Good night (to sleep
Спокойной ночи! (spah-KOY-nuy NOH-chee)
I don't understand. 
Я не понимаю. (ya nee puh-nee-MIGH-yoo)
I don't know. 
Я не знаю. (ya nee ZNAH-yoo)
Where is the toilet? 
Где туалет? (gdyeh too-ah-LYEHT?)
Leave me alone. 
Отстань. (aht-STAHN’!)
Don't touch me! 
Не трогай меня! (nee-TROH-guy mee-NYAH!)
I'll call the police (militsia in Russia). 
Я вызову милицию. (yah VYH-zah-voo mee-LEE-tsyh-yoo!)
Police! (Militsia)
Милиция! (mee-LEE-tsyh-yah!)
Stop! Thief! 
Держите вора! (deer-ZHEE-tyeh VOH-rah!)
I need your help. 
Мне нужна ваша помощь. (mnyeh noozh-NAH VAH-shah POH-muhsh)
It's an emergency. 
Это срочно!. (EH-tuh SROHCH-nuh)
I'm lost. 
Я заблудился/заблудилась - (m/f). (yah zah-bloo-DEEL-suh / zah-bloo-DEE-luhs’)
Below (а) is for feminine:
I lost my bag. 
Я потерял(а) свою сумку. (yah puh-teer-YAHL(-ah) svah-YOOH SOOM-kooh)
I lost my wallet. 
Я потерял(а) свой бумажник. (yah puh-teer-YAHL(-ah) svoy boo-MAHZH-neek)
I'm sick. 
Я болен (m.) / Я больна (f.) (yah-BOH-leen (masculine) / yah-bahl’-NAH (feminine))
I've been injured. 
Я ранен(а) (yah RAH-neen(-ah))
I need a doctor. 
Мне нужен врач. (mnyeh NOO-zhyhn vrahch)
Can I use your phone? 
Можно от вас позвонить? (MOH-zhnuh aht vahs puhz-vah-NEET’?)
(this can be used only for stationary phone, not for mobile. Asking a mobile phone from unknown person is not polite.)

Numbers

.Russian nouns have a paucal form, used with 2, 3, and 4, as well as singular and plural.^ First, the plural came to be used as a polite singular form.
  • SBF Glossary: UR to .uy 25 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Russian optatives are always impersonal constructions with the subject in the dative case followed by the 3rd person singular form of the verb.

^ We used to live in brotherly concord with all of our non-Russian neighbours within the Russian Empire, as well as within the Soviet Union.
  • Russian Victories index 18 January 2010 8:45 UTC russian-victories.ru [Source type: Original source]

Singular quantities and any quantities that end in 1 (21, 301, etc.) use the nominative singular: одна минута, двадцать один час. Quantities 2–4 use the nominative plural: две минуты, три минуты, четыре минуты. .Quantities greater than four use the genitive plural: пять минут, одиннадцать минут, тринадцать минут, etc.^ The symbols R 2 O and RH 4 , etc., are written in the style of the time which uses superscripts to denote the number of atoms in molecules rather than the current style which uses subscripts.
  • Russian Federation | Webelements Nexus 11 January 2010 1:16 UTC www.webelements.com [Source type: Academic]

^ The rarer gold hallmarks are “750” and “958”, which represent a better quality of gold and were produced in much lesser quantities than the most commonly-used “583” hallmark.
  • JEWELRY OF THE SOVIET UNION - a knol by Tamoikins Museum 24 January 2010 10:46 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

один (ah-DEEN) m, одна (ahd-NAH) f, одно (ahd-NOH) n
два (dvah) mn, две (dvyeh) f
три (tree)
четыре (chee-TYH-ree)
пять (pyaht’)
шесть (shehst’)
семь (syeem’)
восемь (VOH-seem’)
девять (DYEH-veet’)
10 
десять (DYEH-suht’)
11 
одиннадцать (ah-DEEN-nuhd-zuht’)
12 
двенадцать (dvee-NAHD-zuht’)
13 
тринадцать (tree-NAHD-zuht’)
14 
четырнадцать (chee-TYHR-nuhd-zuht’)
15 
пятнадцать (peet-NAHD-zuht’)
16 
шестнадцать (shyhst-NAHD-zuht’)
17 
семнадцать (seem-NAHD-zuht’)
18 
восемнадцать (vuh-seem-NAHD-zuht’)
19 
девятнадцать (dee-veet-NAHD-zuht’)
20 
двадцать (DVAHD-zuht’)
21 
двадцать один (DVAHD-zuht’ ah-DEEN)
22 
двадцать два (DVAHD-zuht’ dvah)
23 
двадцать три (DVAHD-zuht’ tree)
30 
тридцать (TREED-zuht’)
40 
сорок (SOH-ruhk)
50 
пятьдесят (pee-dee-SYAHT)
60 
шестьдесят (shyhs-SYAHT)
70 
семьдесят (SYEM’-ee-seet)
80 
восемьдесят (VOH-seem-deeh-seet’)
90 
девяносто (dee-vee-NOH-stuh)
100 
сто (stoh)
150 
полтораста (puhl-tuh-RAHS-tuh)
200 
двести (DVYEH-stee)
300 
триста (TREE-stuh)
400 
четыреста (chee-TYHR-ee-stuh)
500 
пятьсот(peet-SOHT)
1000 
тысяча (TYH-see-chuh)
2000 
две тысячи (dvyeh TYH-see-chee)
5000 
пять тысяч (pyaht’ TYH-seech)
1,000,000 
миллион (mee-lee-OHN)
1,000,000,000 
миллиард (mee-lee-ART)
Number _____ (train, bus, etc.
номер _____ (NOH-meer)
half 
половина (puh-lah-VEE-nuh)
less 
меньше (MYEHN’-sheh)
more 
больше (BOHL’-sheh)
now 
сейчас (see-CHAHS)
later 
позже (POH-zhuh)
before 
раньше (RAHN’-shyeh)
morning 
утро (OOH-truh)
afternoon 
день (dyehn’) (literally 'day')
evening 
вечер (VYEH-chuhr)
night 
ночь (nohch)

Clock time

one o'clock 
час (chahs)
two o'clock 
два часа (dvah chuh-SAH)
three o'clock 
три часа (TREE chuh-SAH)
four o'clock 
четыре часа (chee-TYHR-ree chuh-SA)
five o'clock 
пять часов (pyaht’ chuh-SOHV)
six o'clock 
шесть часов (shest’ chuh-SOHV)
seven o'clock 
семь часов (syem’ chuh-SOHV)
eight o'clock 
восемь часов (VOH-seem’ chuh-SOHV)
nine o'clock 
девять часов (DYEH-veet’ chuh-SOHV)
ten o'clock 
десять часов (DYEH-syuht’ chuh-SOV)
eleven o'clock 
одинадцать часов (ah-DEEN-nad-zut’ chuh-SOV)
twelve o'clock 
двенадцать часов (dvee-NAHD-zut’ chuh-SOV)
noon 
полдень (POHL-dyehn’)
midnight 
полночь (POHL-noch)
half an hour 
полчаса (pohl-chuh-SAH)
Russians do not use A.M. and P.M. Instead they divide the day up roughly as follows:
morning 
утро (OOH-truh) (5 a.m. to noon)
afternoon 
день (dyehn’) (noon to 5 p.m.)
evening 
вечер (VYEH-chuhr) (5 p.m. to midnight)
night 
ночь (noch)(midnight to 5 a.m.)

Duration

.Note: Russian uses different endings depending on the quantity.^ At the end of the article we read that Schiff "used his financial influence to keep Russia from the money markets of the U.S." Also note that Schiff controlled all of the railroads in the U.S. and "suppressed ruinous competition."
  • Jew Watch - Jewish Occupied Governments - USSR - Jews and Communism 25 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.jewwatch.com [Source type: Original source]

^ As a side note, this book is sometimes used in academia as the basic textbook for an introductory course on Russian law.
  • Researching Intellectual Property Law In The Russian Federation | LLRX.com 11 January 2010 1:16 UTC www.llrx.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Wikipedia - Russian Orthodox Church Detailed history and overview of the Russian Orthodox Church; note links at end of article for additional information.
  • SEELRC : Russian Webliography 7 January 2010 5:25 UTC www.seelrc.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The first ending is for quantities of one, the second for quantities of 2–4, and the third for quantities five or greater.
_____ minute 
_____ минута/минуты/минут (mee-NOOT-ah / mee-NOOT-yh / mee-NOOT)
_____ hour(s) 
_____ час/часа/часов (chahs / chuh-SAH / chuh-SOHF)
_____ day(s) 
_____ день/дня/дней (dyehn’ / dnyah / dnyay)
_____ week(s) 
_____ неделя/неделю/недель (nee-DYEHL-yuh / nee-DYEHL-yee / nee-DYEHL’)
_____ month(s) 
_____ месяц/месяца/месяцев (MYEH-seets / MYEH-seets-ah / MYEH-seets-ohf)
_____ year(s) 
_____ год/года/лет (goht / GOH-duh / lyeht) (лет also means "summers")

Days

Note: A week starts with Monday and ends with Sunday.
today 
сегодня (see-VOHD-nyuh)
yesterday 
вчера (fcheeh-RAH)
tomorrow 
завтра (ZAHF-truh)
this week 
на этой неделе (nah EH-tuy nee-DYEHL-yee)
last week 
на прошлой неделе (nah PROSH-luy nee-DYEHL-yee)
next week 
на следующей неделе (nah SLYED-oo-yoo-shchee nee-DYEHL-yeh)
Sunday 
воскресенье (vuhs-kree-SYEHN’-yuh)
Monday 
понедельник (puh-nee-DYEHL’-neek)
Tuesday 
вторник (VTOHR-neek)
Wednesday 
среда (sree-DAH)
Thursday 
четверг (cheet-VYEHRK)
Friday 
пятница (PYAHT-nee-tsuh)
Saturday 
суббота (soo-BOHT-uh)

Months

January 
январь (yeen-VAHR’)
February 
февраль (feev-RAHL’)
March 
март (mahrt)
April 
апрель (ahp-RYEHL’)
May 
май (migh)
June 
июнь (ee-YOON’)
July 
июль (ee-YOOL’)
August 
август (AHV-goost)
September 
сентябрь (seen-TYABR’)
October 
октябрь (ahk-TYABR’)
November 
ноябpь (nah-YABR’)
December 
декабрь (dee-KAHBR’)

Writing time and date

.Dates are written as day.month.year (where day, month and year are numbers) or as day month year (where day and year are numbers and month is written in the genitive).^ "Product of USA for Export to Russia," metric net weight, and production date (day, month, year) use by date or expiration date (day, month, year); The expiration date for poultry parts is 12 months from the date of production.
  • Export Requirements for Russia 28 January 2010 0:46 UTC www.fsis.usda.gov [Source type: Reference]

^ Julian calendar A calendar, named for Gaius Julius Caesar and introduced in Rome in 46 B.C., that established the twelve-month year of 365 days.
  • Library of Congress / Federal Research Division / CountryStudies / Area Handbook Series/ Soviet Union / Glossary 28 January 2010 0:53 UTC memory.loc.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Soviet Glossary 1 February 2010 4:04 UTC www.fas.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ After twenty-eight years, two months, and twenty-seven days, Berlin once again became a city.
  • Soviet Union | Essays & Term Papers Online 24 January 2010 10:46 UTC onlineessays.com [Source type: Original source]

.E.g., May 24th, 2009 should be writed as 24.05.2009 or as 24 мая 2009 года.^ May 24, 2009.

^ Medical Service Awards by Chuck In Oregon 10-24-2009 05:02 AM .
  • WW2 militaria collectors-War relics forum. Uniforms, Guns, helmets, battlefield archeology 10 January 2010 16:49 UTC warrelics.eu [Source type: General]

.Times always use the 24-hour format, e.g., 5:20PM should be written as 17:20.^ Times are given in military time using the 24-hour clock.

^ We should not forget that this is an index to literature written during 1962-1987, (during the time of the Soviet Union, not during the Russian Empire).
  • PU Slavic Manual: Rus/SU/FSr: a short course 28 January 2010 0:53 UTC library.princeton.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The formation of the arbitral tribunal is governed by Paragraphs 17–20 of the ICAC Rules.
  • Russian Federation - CMS_Wiki 11 January 2010 1:16 UTC cms-arbitration.com [Source type: Original source]

black 
чёрный (CHOHR-nyh)
white 
белый (BYEH-lyh)
gray 
серый (SYEH-ryh)
red 
красный (KRAHS-nyh)
blue (dark-blue or navy)
синий (SEE-nyh)
blue (light-blue or cyan) 
голубой (guh-loo-BOY) - use carefully; in Russian slang, this also means "homosexual"!
yellow 
жёлтый (ZHOL-tyh)
green 
зелёный (zee-LYOH-nyh)
orange 
оранжевый (ah-RAHN-zhee-vy)
purple 
фиолетовый (fee-ah-LYET-uh-vyh)
brown 
коричневый (kah-REECH-nee-vyh)
pink 
розовый (ROH-zuh-vyh)

Transportation

Bus and train

How much is a ticket to _____? 
Сколько стоит билет в _____? (SKOL’-kuh STOH-eet bee-LYEHT v _____?)
One ticket to _____, please. 
Один билет в _____, пожалуйста. (ah-DEEN bee-LYEHT v_____ puh-ZHAH-luh-stuh)
Where does this train/bus go? 
Куда идёт этот поезд/автобус? (koo-DAH ee-DYOHT EH-tuht POH-eest / ahf-TOH-boos?)
Where is the train/bus to _____? 
Где поезд/автобус до_____? (gdyeh POH-eest / ahf-TOH-boos duh _____)
Does this train/bus stop in _____? 
Этот поезд/автобус останавливается в _____? (EH-tuht POH-eest / ahf-TOH-boos uhs-tuh-NAHV-lee-vuh-eet-suh v _____?)
When does the train/bus for _____ leave? 
Когда отходит поезд/автобус в _____ ? (kahg-DAH aht-KHOH-deet POH-eest / ahf-TOH-boos v _____?)
When will this train/bus arrive in _____? 
Во сколько этот поезд/автобус приходит в_____? (vah SKOHL’-kuh EH-tuht POH-eest / ahf-TOH-boos pree-KHOH-deet v _____?)

Directions

How do I get to _____ ? 
Как добраться до_____ ? (kahk dah-BRAH-tsuh duh ___?)
...the train station? 
...вокзала? (vah-GZAH-luh)
...the bus station? 
...автовокзала? (ahf-tuh-vah-GZAH-luh)
...the airport? 
... аэропорта? (ah-ehr-ah-POHR-tuh)
...downtown? 
...центра? (TSEHN-trah)
...the youth hostel? 
...молодёжного общежития? (muh-lah-DYOH-zhnuh-vuh ahp-shchee-ZHYH-tee-ya)
...the _____ hotel? 
...гостиницы ______? (gahs-TEE-nee-tsyh)
eg.:
...the Mosfilm hotel? 
...гостиницы Мосфильм? (gahs-TEE-nee-tsyh MOHS-feel’m)
...the American/Canadian/Australian/British consulate? 
...американского/канадского/австралийского/английского консульства? (uh-mee-ree-KAHNS-kuh-vuh / kuh-NAHTS-kuh-vuh / uhfs-truh-LEES-kuh-vuh / ahng-LEES-kuh-vuh KOHN-sool’-stvuh)
Where are there a lot of... 
Где есть много... (gdyeh yehst’ MNOH-ghh)
...hotels? 
...гостиниц? (gahs-TEE-neets?)
...restaurants? 
...ресторанов? (rees-tah-RAHN-uhf?)
...bars? 
...баров? (BAHR-uhf)
...sites to see? 
...достопримечательностей? (duhs-tuh-pree-mee-CHAH-teel’-nuhs-tyay)
Please can you show me on the map? 
Пожалуйста Вы можете показать на карте? (puh-ZHAH-luh-stuh vyh MOH-zhyh-tee puh-kuh-ZAHT’ nuh KAHR-tyeh)
street 
улица (OO-lee-tsuh)
Turn left. 
Поверните налево. (puh-veer-NEE-tyeh nuh-LYEH-vuh)
Turn right. 
Поверните направо. (puh-veer-NEE-tyeh nuh-PRAH-vuh)
left 
налево (nuh-LYEH-vuh)
right 
направо (nuh-PRAH-vuh...)
straight ahead 
прямо (PRYAH-muh)
towards the _____ 
к _____ (k)
past the _____ 
мимо _____ (MEEH-mah)
before the _____ 
перед _____ (PYEH-reet)
Watch for the _____. 
Ищите _____. (ee-SHCHEE-tyeh)
intersection 
перекрёсток (pee-ree-KRYOH-stuhk)
north 
север (SYEH-veer)
south 
юг (yook)
east 
восток (vahs-TOHK)
west 
запад (ZAH-puht)
uphill 
вверх (VVYEHR-kh)
downhill 
вниз (vnees)

Taxi

Taxi! 
Такси! (Tahk-SEE!)
Take me to _____, please. 
Довезите меня до _____, пожалуйста. (duh-vee-ZEE-tyeh mee-NYAH duh _____, puh-ZHAH-luh-stuh.')
How much does it cost to get to _____? 
Сколько стоит доехать до ______? (SKOHL’-kuh STOH-eet dah-YEH-khut’ duh ____?)
Take me there, please. 
Довезите меня туда, пожалуйста. (duh-vee-ZEE-tyeh meenyah too-DAH, puh-ZHAH-luh-stuh.)
Do you have any rooms available? 
У вас есть свободные комнаты? (oo vash YEHST’ svah-BOD-nyh-yeh KOHM-nuh-tyh)
How much is a room for one person/two people? 
Сколько стоит комната на одного человека/двух человек? (SKOHL’-kuh STOH-eet KOM-nuh-tuh nah uhd-nah-VOH chee-lah-VYEH-kuh / dvookh chee-lah-VYEHK )
Does the room come with... 
В этой комнате есть... (VEH-tuy KOHM-nuh-tyeh yest’...)
...bedsheets? 
...простыни? (...PROHS-tee-nee)
...a bathroom? 
...ванная? (...VAHN-nah-yuh)
...a telephone? 
...телефон? (...tee-lee-FOHN)
...a TV? 
...телевизор? (...tee-lee-VEE-zuhr)
May I see the room first? 
Могу я сначала посмотреть комнату? (mah-GOOH yah znuh-CHAH-luh puhs-mah-TRYEHT’ KOHM-nah-too)
Do you have anything quieter? 
У вас есть что-нибудь потише? (oo vah yehst’ CHTOH-nee-boot’ pah-TEE-shyh?)
...bigger? 
...побольше? (pah-BOHL’-shyh)
...cleaner? 
...почище? (pah-CHEE-shcheh)
...cheaper? 
...подешевле? (puh-dee-SHEHV-lyeh)
OK, I'll take it. 
Хорошо, я беру. (khah-rah-SHOH yah bee-ROO)
I will stay for _____ night(s). 
Я останусь на _____ ночь (ночи/ночей). (yah ahs-TAH-noos’ nah _____ nohch’ (NOH-chee/nah-CHYAY)
Can you suggest another hotel? 
Вы можете предложить другую гостиницу? (vy MOH-zhee-te pred-la-ZHYHT’ droo-GOO-yoo gahs-TEE-nee-tsoo)
Do you have a safe? 
У вас есть сейф? (oo vahs yest’ syayf)
...lockers? 
...индивидуальные сейфы? (een-dee-vee-doo-AHL’-nyh-yeh SYAY-fee)
Is breakfast/supper included? 
Завтрак/ужин включен? (ZAHF-truhk / OO-zhyhn fklyoo-CHON)
What time is breakfast/supper? 
Во сколько завтрак/ужин? (vuh SKOHL’-kuh ZAH-ftruhk / OO-zhyhn)
Please clean my room. 
Уберите в моей комнате, пожалуйста. (oo-bee-REE-tyeh vmah-YAY KOHM-nuh-tyeh, puh-ZHAH-luh-stuh)
Can you wake me at _____? 
Не могли бы вы разбудить меня в _____? (nee mah-GLEE byh vyh rahz-boo-DEET’ mee-NYAH v _____? )
I want to check out. 
Дайте счёт. (DIGH-tyeh shchyoht)
Do you accept American/Australian/Canadian dollars? 
Вы принимаете американские/австралийские/канадские доллары? (vyh pree-nee-MAH-ee-tyeh uh-mee-ree-KAHN-skee-yeh / uhv-struh-LEE-skee-yeh / kuh-NAHD-skee-yeh DOH-luhr-yh)
Do you accept British pounds? 
Вы принимаете английские фунты? (vyh pree-nee-MAH-ee-tyeh ahn-GLEE-skee-yeh FOON-tyh)
Do you accept credit cards? 
Вы принимаете кредитные карты? (vyh pree-nee-MAH-ee-tyeh kree-DEET-nyh-yeh KAHR-tyh)
Can you change money for me? 
Не могли бы вы обменять мне деньги? (nyeh mah-GLEE byh vyh uhb-meen-YAHT’ mnyeh DYEHN’-gee)
Where can I get money changed? 
Где я могу обменять деньги? (gdyeh yah mah-GOO uhb-meen-YAHT’ DYEHN’-gee)
Can you change a traveler's check for me? 
Вы можете обменять мне дорожный чек? (vyh MOH-zhyh-tyeh uhb-meen-YAHT’ mnyeh dah-ROHZH-nyh chyehk)
Where can I get a traveler's check changed? 
Где я могу обменять дорожный чек? (gdyeh yah mah-GOO uhb-meen-YAHT’ dah-ROHZH-nyh chyehk)
What is the exchange rate? 
Какой курс обмена? (kah-KOY koors ahb-MYEHN-uh)
Where is an automatic teller machine (ATM)? 
Где здесь банкомат? (gdyeh zdyes’ bahn-kuh-MAHT)
A table for one person/two people, please. 
Столик на одного человека/двух человек, пожалуйста. (STOH-leek nah uhd-nah-VOH chee-lah-VYEH-kah/dvookh chee-lah-VYEHK)
Can I look at the menu, please? 
Могу я посмотреть меню? (mah-GOO yah puhs-mah-TRYEHT’ meen-YOO'')
Can I look in the kitchen? 
Я могу посмотреть на кухню? (yah mah-GOO puh-smah-TRYEHT’ nah KOOKH-nee-yoo)
Is there a house specialty? 
Какое у вас фирменное блюдо? (kah-KOY-yeh oo vahs feer-MYEHN-noy-yeh BLYOO-duh)
Is there a local specialty? 
Какое у вас местное фирменное блюдо? (kah-KOY-yeh oo vahs myehst-NOY-yeh feer-MYEHN-noy-yeh BLYOO-duh)
I'm a vegetarian. 
Я вегетарианец/вегетарианка. (yah vee-gee-tuh-ree-YAHN-eets/vee-gee-tuh-ree-YAHN-kah)
I don't eat pork. 
Я не ем свинину. (yah nee yehm svee-NEEN-oo)
I don't eat beef. 
Я не ем говядину. (yah nee yehm gahv-YAH-deen-oo)
I only eat kosher food. 
Я принимаю только кошерную пищу. (yah pree-nee-MAH-yoo TOHL’-kuh kah-SHERH-noo-yoo PEE-shchoo.)
Can you make it "lite", please? (less oil/butter/lard
Сделайте, пожалуйста, поменьше жира. (SDYEH-ligh-tyeh, puh-zhahl-uh-stuh, pah-MYEHN'-shyh zhyh-RAH)
fixed-price meal 
комплексный обед (KOHM-plyehks-nyh ah-BYEHT)
à la carte 
карта вин (KAHR-tah veen)
breakfast 
завтрак (ZAHF-truhk)
lunch 
обед (ah-BYEHT)
tea (meal
полдник (POHLD-neek)
supper 
ужин (OO-zhyhn)
I want _____. 
Я хочу _____. (yah khah-CHOO) (use first form below)
I want a dish containing _____. 
Я хочу блюдо с _____. (yah khah-CHOO BLYOO-duh s _____) (use second form)
chicken 
курицу/ой (KOO-reet-soo / KOO-reet-suy)
beef 
говядину/ой (gahv-YAH-dee-noo / gahv-YAH-dee-nuy)
fish 
рыбу/ой (RYH-boo / RYH-boy)
ham 
свинину/ой (svee-NEE-noo / svee-NEE-nuy)
sausage 
колбасу/ой (kuhl-bah-SOO / kuhl-bah-SOY)
cheese 
сыр/ом (syhr / SYH-ruhm)
eggs 
яйца/ами (YIGH-tsah / YIGH-tsah-mee)
salad 
салат/ом (sah-LAHT / sah-LAHT-ohm)
(fresh) vegetables 
(свежие/ими) овощи/ами ((SVYEH-zhyh-yeh / SVYEH-zhyh-mee OH-vuh-shchee/ uh-vuh-SHCHAH-mee)
(fresh) fruit 
(свежие/ими) фрукты/ами ((SVYEH-zhyh-yeh / SVYEH-zhyh-mee FROOK-tyh / FROOK-tuh-mee)
bread 
хлеб/ом (khlyep / KHLYEH-buhm)
toast 
тост/ом (tohst / TOHST-uhhm))
noodles 
лапша/ой (LAHP-shuh / lahp-SHOY)
pasta 
макароны/онами (mah-kah-ROH-nyh / mah-kah-ROH-nah-mee)
rice 
рис/ом (rees / REE-suhm)
beans 
фасоль/фасолью (fah-SOHL’ / fah-SOHL-yoo)
May I have a glass of _____? 
Дайте, пожалуйста, стакан _____? (DIGH-tyeh, puh-ZHAH-luh-stuh, stah-KAHN _____?)
May I have a cup of _____? 
Дайте, пожалуйста, чашку _____? (DIGH-tyeh, puh-ZHAH-luh-stuh, CHAHSH-koo)
May I have a bottle of _____? 
Дайте, пожалуйста, бутылку _____? (DIGH-tyeh, puh-ZHAH-luh-stuh, boo-TYHL-koo)
...coffee 
...кофе (KOH-feh)
...tea (drink
...чая (CHAH-yuh)
...juice 
...сока (SOH-kah)
...(bubbly) water 
...минеральной воды (mee-nee-RAHL'-nuy vah-DYH)
...water 
...воды (vah-DYH)
...beer 
...пива (PEE-vuh)
...red/white wine 
...красного/белого вина (KRAH-snuh-vuh / BYEH-luh-vuh vee-NAH)
May I have some _____? 
Дайте, пожалуйста _____. (DIGH-tyeh, puh-ZHAH-luh-stuh)
salt 
соль (sohl’)
black pepper 
чёрный перец (CHYOHR-nyh PYEH-reets)
butter 
масло (MAHS-luh)
Excuse me, waiter? (getting attention of server)
Официант!/Девушка! (uh-fee-TSAHNT! / .DYEH-voosh-kuh!) The former is very polite and gender neutral, the latter only for female servers, and should not be used in a nice restaurant.^ The latter was the only remaining political show on Russian television that was broadcast live.
  • freedomhouse.org: Country Report 28 January 2010 0:46 UTC www.freedomhouse.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Travellers taking prescription medicine should only carry enough for personal use, as well as bringing their prescriptions.
  • Russia Travel Advice and Advisories | Government of Canada 28 January 2010 0:46 UTC www.voyage.gc.ca [Source type: News]

^ In criminal law we should make greater use of so-called administrative preclusion, that is, prosecute only in the case of repeated administrative offences.
  • Presidential Address to the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation [Voltaire] 11 January 2010 1:16 UTC www.voltairenet.org [Source type: Original source]

I'm finished. 
Я наелся/наелась. (yah nah-YEHL-syuh/yah nah-YEH-las’)
It was delicious. 
Это было великолепно. (EH-tuh BYH-luh vyeh-lee-kah-LYEHP-nuh)
Please clear the plates. 
Можете убрать со стола. (MOH-zhyh-tyeh oo-BRAHT’ suh stuh-LAH)
The check, please. 
Счёт, пожалуйста. (shchyoht, puh-ZHAH-luh-stuh)
Do you serve alcohol? 
Вы продаёте алкогольные напитки? (VYH pruh-dah-YOH-tyeh ahl-kuh-GOHL’-nyh-yeh nah-PEET-kee?)
Is there table service? 
Здесь есть официант? (zdyehs’ yehst’ ah-fee-TSANT)
A beer/two beers, please. 
Будьте добры, одно пиво/два пива. (BOOT’-tyeh dah-BRYH, ad-noh PEE-vuh / dvah PEE-vah)
A glass of red/white wine, please. 
Будьте добры, бокал красного/белого вина. (BOOT'-tyeh dah-BRYH, bah-KAHL KRAHZ-nuh-vuh / BYEH-luh-vuh vee-NAH)
A pint, please. 
Будьте добры, одну пинту. (BOOT’-tyeh dah-BRYH, ahd-NOO PEEN-too)
A bottle, please. 
Будьте добры, одну бутылку. (BOOT’-tyeh dah-BRYH, ahd-NOO boo-TYHL-koo)
_____ (hard liquor) and _____ (mixer), please. 
Будьте добры, _____ (hard liquor) с _____ (mixer in ablative form). (...)
whiskey 
виски (VEE-skee)
vodka 
водка (VOHT-kah)
rum 
poм (rohm)
water 
вода/ой (vah-DAH / vah-DOY)
club soda 
газированная/ой вода/ой (газировка/ой) (guh-zee-ROH-vuhn-nuh-yuh / guh-zee-ROH-vuhn-nuy vah-DAH / vah-DOY)
tonic water 
тоник/ом (TOH-neek/TOH-neek-uhm)
orange juice 
апельсиновый/ым сок/ом (uh-peel’-SEE-nuh-vyh / uh-peel’-SEE-nuh-vyhm sohk / SOHK-uhm)
Coke (soda
кола/ой (лимонад/ом) (KOH-lah / KOH-luy)
Do you have any bar snacks? 
Здесь есть буфет? (zdyehs’ yehst’ boo-FYEHT)
One more, please. 
Ещё одну, пожалуйста. (yee-SHCHYOH ahd-NOOH, puh-ZHAH-luh-stuh)
Another round, please. 
Повторите, пожалуйста. (puhf-tah-REEH-tye, puh-ZHAH-luh-stuh)
When is closing time? 
Когда вы закрываетесь? (kahg-DAH vyh zuh-kryh-VAH-ee-tyehs’?)
Do you have this in my size? 
У вас есть это моего размера? (oo vahs yehst’ EH-tuh ma-ee-VOH rahz-MYEH-ruh)
How much is this? 
Сколько это стоит? (SKOHL’-kuh EH-tuh STOH-eet)
That's too expensive. 
Это слишком дорого. (EH-tuh SLEESH-kuhm DOH-ruh-guh)
Would you take _____? 
Вы примете _____? (vyh PREE-mee-tyeh _____?)
expensive 
дорого (DOH-ruh-guh)
cheap 
дёшево (DYOH-shyh-vuh)
I can't afford it. 
Я не могу себе этого позволить. (yah nee mah-GOOH see-BYEH EH-tuh-vuh paz-VOH-leet’)
I don't want it. 
Я это не хочу. (yah EH-tuh nee khah-CHOO)
You're cheating me. 
Вы меня обманываете. (vyh mee-NYAH ab-MAH-nyh-vah-ee-tyeh)
I'm not interested. 
Мне это не интересно.. (mnyeh EH-tuh nee een-tee-RYEHS-nuh)
OK, I'll take it. 
Хорошо, я возьму. (khah-rah-SHOH, yah vahz’-MOO)
Can I have a bag? 
Дайте, пожалуйста, пакет. (DIGH-tyeh, puh-ZHAH-luh-stuh, pah-KYEHT)
Do you ship (overseas)? 
У вас есть доставка (за границу)? (oo vahs yehst’ dahs-TAHF-kah (zah grah-NEET-sooh)
Give me two (items of something)
Давайте две. (dah-VIGH-tyeh DVYEH)
I need... 
Мне нужен/нужна/нужно/нужны... (mnyeh NOO-zhehn / nooh-ZHNAH / NOOZH-nuh / nooh-ZHNYH)
...toothpaste. 
...зубная паста. (ZOOB-nuh-yuh PAHS-tuh)
...a toothbrush. 
...зубная щётка. (ZOOB-nuh-yuh SHCHYOHT-kuh)
...tampons. 
...тампоны. (tahm-POH-nyh)
...soap. 
...мыло. (MYH-luh)
...shampoo. 
...шампунь. (shahm-POON’)
...pain reliever. (e.g., aspirin or ibuprofen
...обезболивающее. (ah-beez-BOH-lee-vah-yoo-shchee-yeh)
...cold medicine. 
...лекарство от простуды. (lee-KAHR-stvah aht prah-STOO-dyh)
...stomach medicine. 
...лекарство от живота. (lee-KAHR-stvah aht zhyh-VOH-tuh)
...a razor. 
...бритва. (BREET-vuh)
...an umbrella. 
...зонтик. (ZOHN-teek)
...sunblock lotion. 
...лосьон от загара. (luhs’-YOHN ahd zah-GAH-ruh)
...a postcard. 
...открытка. (aht-KRYHT-kah)
...postage stamps. 
...почтовые марки. (pahtch-TOH-vyh-yeh MAHR-kee)
...batteries. 
...батарейки. (bah-tah-RAY-kee)
...writing paper. 
...бумага. (boo-MAH-guh)
...a pen. 
...ручка. (ROOCH-kuh)
...English-language books. 
...книги на английском языке. (KNEE-gee nah ahn-GLEE-skuhm yuh-zee-KYEH)
...English-language magazines. 
...журналы на английском языке. (zhoor-NAH-lyh nah ahn-GLEE-skuhm yuh-zyh-KYEH)
...an English-language newspaper. 
...газета на английском языке. (gah-ZYEH-tah nah ahn-GLEE-skuhm yuh-zyh-KYEH)
...a Russian-English dictionary. 
...русско-английский словарь. (ROO-skuh ahn-GLEE-skee slah-VAHR’)
I want to rent a car. 
Я хочу взять машину напрокат. (yah khah-CHOO vzyaht’ mah-SHYH-noo nuh-prah-KAHT)
Can I get insurance? 
Я могу взять страховку? (yah mah-GOO vzyaht’ strah-KHOHF-koo)
Stop (on a street sign
СТОП (stohp)
One way 
одностороннее движение (uhd-nuh-stah-ROHN-nee-yeh dvee-ZHEH-nee-yeh)
Yield 
уступите дорогу (oo-stoo-PEE-tyeh dah-ROH-goo)
No parking 
парковки нет (pahr-KOHF-kee nyeht)
Speed limit 
ограничение скорости (ah-grah-nee-CHEH-nyh-yeh SKOH-ruh-stee)
Gas (petrol) station 
(авто)заправка ((AHF-tuh) zah-PRAHF-kuh)
Petrol 
бензин (been-ZEEN)
Diesel 
ДТ (дизельное топливо) (deh teh (DEE-zehl’-nuh-yeh TOH-plee-vuh)
I haven't done anything wrong. 
Я ничего плохого не делал(а). (yah nee-chee-VOH plah-KHOH-vuh nee DYEH-luhl/luh-luh)
It was a misunderstanding. 
Мы друг друга не поняли. (myh droog DROO-guh nee POHN-yuh-lee)
Where are you taking me? 
Куда вы меня везёте? (koo-DAH vyh myh-NYAH vee-ZYOH-tyeh?)
Am I under arrest? 
Я арестован(а)? (yah ah-ryehs-TOH-vuhn/vuh-nah?)
I am an American/Australian/British/Canadian citizen. 
Я гражданин/гражданка Америки/Австралии/Великобритании/Канады. (yah grazh-dah-NEEN/grazh-DAHN-kah ah-MYEH-ree-kee / ahf-STRAH-lee-yeh / vee-lee-kuh-bree-TAH-nee-yeh / kah-NAH-dyh)
I want to talk to the American/Australian/British/Canadian embassy/consulate. 
Я хочу поговорить с посольством/консульством Америки/Австралии/Великобритании/Канады. (yah khah-CHOO puh-guh-vah-REET s pah-SOL’ST-vuhm / s KOHN-sool’-stvuhm ah-MEH-ree-kee / ahf-STRAH-lee-yeh/ vee-lee-kuh-bree-TAH-nee-yeh / kah-NAH-dyh)
I want to talk to a lawyer. 
Я хочу поговорить с адвокатом. (yah hah-CHOO puh-guh-vah-REET s ahd-vuh-KAH-tuhm)
Can I just pay a fine now? 
Я могу заплатить штраф сейчас? (yah mah-GOO zah-plah-TEET’ shtrahf say-CHAHS?) .(This phrase indicates that you want to pay a bribe to get out of trouble.^ But in fact the newly created cooperatives became an organized mafia themselves, extracting and paying out bribes at an unprecedented rate.
  • The Decline and Fall of Gorbachev and the Soviet State - Yuri N. Maltsev - Mises Institute 28 January 2010 0:53 UTC mises.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ "If you want to make a film out of my story...make it a bit on the boring side."
  • SovLit.com - Soviet Literature Summarized 24 January 2010 10:46 UTC www.sovlit.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Getting huge money out of international trades this monopoly giant doesn't want to pay taxes.
  • Russia - Economic analysis of government's policies, investment climate and political risk. 28 January 2010 0:46 UTC www.mkeever.com [Source type: Original source]

)

Study guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiversity

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Courses

Recommended Reading

  • Schaum's Outline of Russian Grammar
  • Barron's 501 Russian Verbs
  • The New Penguin Russian Course

External links


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

.There is more than one meaning of Russian discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.^ On the whole, they are more remote from one another than even on the plains of N. America , those of 46° to 32° being distributed over twenty degrees of latitude.

^ Thus more than 88 millions of the Russians are peasants.

^ Indeed it is estimated that there are more than 12,000,000 Dissenters in Great Russia alone.

.We are planning to let all links go to the correct meaning directly, but for now you will have to search it out from the list below by yourself.^ Don´t let them count you out.
  • CNN Political Ticker: All politics, all the time Blog Archive - Huckabee: Washington State vote like the Soviet Union « - Blogs from CNN.com 28 January 2010 0:53 UTC politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com [Source type: Original source]

^ February 11th, 2008 2:32 pm ET For all of you democrats jumping on the bandwagon, let me point out three things.
  • CNN Political Ticker: All politics, all the time Blog Archive - Huckabee: Washington State vote like the Soviet Union « - Blogs from CNN.com 28 January 2010 0:53 UTC politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com [Source type: Original source]

^ You count all the votes, I don't care if 99% was going to McCain.
  • CNN Political Ticker: All politics, all the time Blog Archive - Huckabee: Washington State vote like the Soviet Union « - Blogs from CNN.com 28 January 2010 0:53 UTC politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com [Source type: Original source]

.If you want to change the link that led you here yourself, it would be appreciated.^ What links here Related changes Special Pages This page was last modified 20:38, 27 Oct 2006.


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Wikipedia-logo.png
Wikipedia has an article on:

Contents

English

Pronunciation

Noun

Singular
Russian
Plural
Russians
Russian (plural Russians)
  1. A person from Russia.
  2. An ethnic Russian.
  3. A domestic cat breed.
  4. A cat of this breed.

Translations

See also

Proper noun

Singular
Russian
Plural
-
Russian
  1. The Russian language.

Translations

See also

External links

Adjective

Russian (comparative more Russian, superlative most Russian)
Positive
Russian
Comparative
more Russian
Superlative
most Russian
  1. Of or pertaining to Russia.
  2. (dated) Of or pertaining to Rus.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

Russian alphabet (Cyrillic)
АаБбВвГгДдЕеЁёЖжЗзИиЙй
КкЛлМмНнОоПпРрСсТтУуФф
ХхЦцЧчШшЩщЪъЫыЬьЭэЮюЯя

Wikibooks

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From Wikibooks, the open-content textbooks collection

Infobox/Russian
Russian/Print version
RUSSIAN


РУССКИЙ

Learning the Russian Language, for English Speakers

Smolny Convent


Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 05, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Russian language, which are similar to those in the above article.








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