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SK-105 Kürassier
GuentherZ 2006-08 12 0891 Jagdpanzer Kuerassier OeBH.jpg
A SK-105
Type Tank destroyer, light tank
Place of origin Austria
Production history
Manufacturer Saurer-Werk
Specifications
Weight 17.7 tonnes
Length 5.58 m (7.76 m w/ main gun)
Width 2.5 m
Height 2.88 m
Crew 3

Armor 40mm (maximum) 8mm (base)
Primary
armament
105 mm rifled gun
Secondary
armament
7.62 mm co-axial, 7.62 mm anti-aircraft machine gun
Engine Steyr 7FA / 6 cylinder
238kW diesel engine
320 hp (238 kW)
Suspension torsion bar, 5 road wheels
Operational
range
500 km
Speed 70 km/h

The SK-105 Kürassier is an Austrian light tank or tank destroyer armed with a rifled 105 mm gun in an oscillating turret. It is estimated that over 700 have been produced.

Contents

History

The SK-105 was developed by Saurer-Werk (now Steyr-Daimler-Puch) to meet the Austrian Army's operational requirement for a mobile anti-tank vehicle. The first prototype was ready in 1967 and delivery of pre-production vehicles commenced in 1971.[1][2]

The SK-105 is based on a heavily modified Saurer APC. Due to its low weight the SK-105 can be transported by C-130 Hercules transport aircraft. The turret of the SK-105 is based on a French design, developed for the AMX-13. Its gun can penetrate 360 mm of armor.

This vehicle is specifically designed for mountain terrain and has an improved climbing ability compared to heavier main battle tanks.

Variants

  • SK-105 A1
  • SK-105 A2
  • Greif armored recovery vehicle
  • Pionier engineering vehicle
  • SK-105 driver training vehicle

Derivative

Argentina developed in the early 2000s the light tank "Patagón", which had a SK-105 chassis with an AMX-13 turret. The prototype was presented in November 2005. Another 39 conversions were planned to be completed in 2005-9, at an estimated cost of 23.4 million U$S. [3]

Users

References

See also

External links

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