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Solute carrier family 17 (sodium-dependent inorganic phosphate cotransporter), member 7
Identifiers
Symbols SLC17A7; BNPI; VGLUT1
External IDs OMIM605208 HomoloGene69302 GeneCards: SLC17A7 Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE SLC17A7 204230 s at tn.png
PBB GE SLC17A7 204229 at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 57030 n/a
Ensembl ENSG00000104888 n/a
UniProt n/a n/a
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_020309 n/a
RefSeq (protein) NP_064705 n/a
Location (UCSC) Chr 19:
54.62 - 54.64 Mb
n/a
PubMed search [1] n/a

Vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SLC17A7 gene.[1][2][3]

The protein encoded by this gene is a vesicle-bound, sodium-dependent phosphate transporter that is specifically expressed in the neuron-rich regions of the brain. It is preferentially associated with the membranes of synaptic vesicles and functions in glutamate transport. The protein shares 82% identity with the differentiation-associated Na-dependent inorganic phosphate cotransporter and they appear to form a distinct class within the Na+/Pi cotransporter family.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ Ni B, Du Y, Wu X, DeHoff BS, Rosteck PR Jr, Paul SM (Jul 1996). "Molecular cloning, expression, and chromosomal localization of a human brain-specific Na(+)-dependent inorganic phosphate cotransporter". J Neurochem 66 (6): 2227-38. PMID 8632143.  
  2. ^ Aihara Y, Mashima H, Onda H, Hisano S, Kasuya H, Hori T, Yamada S, Tomura H, Yamada Y, Inoue I, Kojima I, Takeda J (Jun 2000). "Molecular cloning of a novel brain-type Na(+)-dependent inorganic phosphate cotransporter". J Neurochem 74 (6): 2622-5. PMID 10820226.  
  3. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: SLC17A7 solute carrier family 17 (sodium-dependent inorganic phosphate cotransporter), member 7". http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=gene&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=57030.  

Further reading

  • Bellocchio EE, Reimer RJ, Fremeau RT, Edwards RH (2000). "Uptake of glutamate into synaptic vesicles by an inorganic phosphate transporter.". Science 289 (5481): 957–60. doi:10.1126/science.289.5481.957. PMID 10938000.  
  • Takamori S, Rhee JS, Rosenmund C, Jahn R (2000). "Identification of a vesicular glutamate transporter that defines a glutamatergic phenotype in neurons.". Nature 407 (6801): 189–94. doi:10.1038/35025070. PMID 11001057.  
  • Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH, et al. (2003). "Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences.". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99 (26): 16899–903. doi:10.1073/pnas.242603899. PMID 12477932.  
  • Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, et al. (2004). "Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.". Nat. Genet. 36 (1): 40–5. doi:10.1038/ng1285. PMID 14702039.  
  • Eastwood SL, Harrison PJ (2005). "Decreased expression of vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and complexin II mRNAs in schizophrenia: further evidence for a synaptic pathology affecting glutamate neurons.". Schizophrenia Research 73 (2-3): 159–72. doi:10.1016/j.schres.2004.05.010. PMID 15653259.  
  • Alonso-Nanclares L, De Felipe J (2005). "Vesicular glutamate transporter 1 immunostaining in the normal and epileptic human cerebral cortex.". Neuroscience 134 (1): 59–68. doi:10.1016/j.neuroscience.2005.03.038. PMID 15961236.  
  • Vinatier J, Herzog E, Plamont MA, et al. (2006). "Interaction between the vesicular glutamate transporter type 1 and endophilin A1, a protein essential for endocytosis.". J. Neurochem. 97 (4): 1111–25. doi:10.1111/j.1471-4159.2006.03821.x. PMID 16606361.  
  • Almqvist J, Huang Y, Laaksonen A, et al. (2007). "Docking and homology modeling explain inhibition of the human vesicular glutamate transporters.". Protein Sci. 16 (9): 1819–29. doi:10.1110/ps.072944707. PMID 17660252.  

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.

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edit
Solute carrier family 17 (sodium-dependent inorganic phosphate cotransporter), member 7
Identifiers
Symbols SLC17A7; BNPI; VGLUT1
External IDs OMIM: 605208 HomoloGene69302
RNA expression pattern

More reference expression data

Orthologs
Human Mouse
Entrez 57030 n/a
Ensembl ENSG00000104888 n/a
Refseq NM_020309 (mRNA)
NP_064705 (protein)
n/a (mRNA)
n/a (protein)
Location Chr 19: 54.62 - 54.64 Mb n/a
Pubmed search [1] n/a

Solute carrier family 17 (sodium-dependent inorganic phosphate cotransporter), member 7, also known as SLC17A7, is a human gene.[1]

The protein encoded by this gene is a vesicle-bound, sodium-dependent phosphate transporter that is specifically expressed in the neuron-rich regions of the brain. It is preferentially associated with the membranes of synaptic vesicles and functions in glutamate transport. The protein shares 82% identity with the differentiation-associated Na-dependent inorganic phosphate cotransporter and they appear to form a distinct class within the Na+/Pi cotransporter family.[1]

See also

References

Further reading

  • Ni B, Du Y, Wu X, et al. (1996). "Molecular cloning, expression, and chromosomal localization of a human brain-specific Na(+)-dependent inorganic phosphate cotransporter.". J. Neurochem. 66 (6): 2227–38. PMID 8632143. 
  • Aihara Y, Mashima H, Onda H, et al. (2000). "Molecular cloning of a novel brain-type Na(+)-dependent inorganic phosphate cotransporter.". J. Neurochem. 74 (6): 2622–5. doi:10.1046/j.1471-4159.2000.0742622.x. PMID 10820226. 
  • Bellocchio EE, Reimer RJ, Fremeau RT, Edwards RH (2000). "Uptake of glutamate into synaptic vesicles by an inorganic phosphate transporter.". Science 289 (5481): 957–60. doi:10.1126/science.289.5481.957. PMID 10938000. 
  • Takamori S, Rhee JS, Rosenmund C, Jahn R (2000). "Identification of a vesicular glutamate transporter that defines a glutamatergic phenotype in neurons.". Nature 407 (6801): 189–94. doi:10.1038/35025070. PMID 11001057. 
  • Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH, et al. (2003). "Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences.". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99 (26): 16899–903. doi:10.1073/pnas.242603899. PMID 12477932. 
  • Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, et al. (2004). "Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.". Nat. Genet. 36 (1): 40–5. doi:10.1038/ng1285. PMID 14702039. 
  • Eastwood SL, Harrison PJ (2005). "Decreased expression of vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and complexin II mRNAs in schizophrenia: further evidence for a synaptic pathology affecting glutamate neurons.". Schizophrenia Research 73 (2-3): 159–72. doi:10.1016/j.schres.2004.05.010. PMID 15653259. 
  • Alonso-Nanclares L, De Felipe J (2005). "Vesicular glutamate transporter 1 immunostaining in the normal and epileptic human cerebral cortex.". Neuroscience 134 (1): 59–68. doi:10.1016/j.neuroscience.2005.03.038. PMID 15961236. 
  • Vinatier J, Herzog E, Plamont MA, et al. (2006). "Interaction between the vesicular glutamate transporter type 1 and endophilin A1, a protein essential for endocytosis.". J. Neurochem. 97 (4): 1111–25. doi:10.1111/j.1471-4159.2006.03821.x. PMID 16606361. 
  • Almqvist J, Huang Y, Laaksonen A, et al. (2007). "Docking and homology modeling explain inhibition of the human vesicular glutamate transporters.". Protein Sci. 16 (9): 1819–29. doi:10.1110/ps.072944707. PMID 17660252. 


This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.


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