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STS-111
Mission insignia
Sts-111-patch.png
Mission statistics
Mission name STS-111
Space shuttle Endeavour
Launch date June 5, 2002 21:22:49 UTC
Landing June 19, 2002 17:58:45 UTC EAFB Runway 22
Mission duration 13 days, 20:35:56
Orbital altitude 122 nautical miles (226 km)
Orbital inclination 51.6 degrees
Distance traveled 5.8 million miles (9.3 million km)
Crew photo
STS-111 crew.jpg
(L-R): Philippe Perrin, Paul S. Lockhart, Kenneth D. Cockrell, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz
Related missions
Previous mission Next mission
STS-110 STS-110 STS-112 STS-112
Launched Expedition 5 crew
Landed Expedition 4 crew
Endeavour carrying the MPLM on its approach to the ISS on STS-111
Illustration of the International Space Station during STS-111

STS-111 was a space shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Endeavour. STS-111 resupplied the station and replaced the Expedition 4 crew with the Expedition 5 crew. It was launched on June 5, 2002, from Kennedy Space Center, Florida.

Contents

Crew

Position Launching Astronaut Landing Astronaut
Commander Kenneth D. Cockrell
Fifth spaceflight
Pilot Paul S. Lockhart
First spaceflight
Mission Specialist 1 Franklin Chang-Diaz
Seventh spaceflight
Mission Specialist 2 Philippe Perrin, CNES
First spaceflight
Mission Specialist 3 Valery G. Korzun, RKA
Expedition 5
Second spaceflight
ISS Commander
Yuri I. Onufrienko, RKA
Expedition 4
Second spaceflight
ISS Commander
Mission Specialist 4 Peggy A. Whitson
Expedition 5
First spaceflight
ISS Flight Engineer
Carl E. Walz
Expedition 4
Fourth spaceflight
ISS Flight Engineer
Mission Specialist 5 Sergei Y. Treshchev, RKA
Expedition 5
First spaceflight
ISS Flight Engineer
Daniel W. Bursch
Expedition 4
Fourth spaceflight
ISS Flight Engineer

Mission parameters

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Docking with ISS

  • Docked: June 7, 2002, 16:25:00 UTC
  • Undocked: June 15, 2002, 14:32:00 UTC
  • Time Docked: 7 days, 22 h, 7 min, 00 s

Mission highlights

STS-111, in addition to providing supplies, rotated the crews aboard the International Space Station, exchanging the three Expedition 4 members (1 Russian, 2 American) for the three Expedition 5 members (2 Russian, 1 American).

The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) carried experiment racks and three stowage and resupply racks to the station. The mission also installed a component of the Canadarm2 called the Mobile Base System (MBS) to the Mobile Transporter (MT) (which was installed during STS-110); This completed the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS. This gave the mechanical arm the capability to "inchworm" from the U.S. Lab fixture to the MSS and travel along the Truss to work sites.

STS-111 was the last flight of a CNES astronaut, the French agency having disbanded its astronaut group and transferred them to the ESA.

Spacewalks

Mission Spacewalkers Start - UTC End - UTC Duration Mission
39. STS-111
EVA 1
Franklin R. Chang-Diaz
Philippe Perrin
June 9, 2002
15:27
June 9, 2002
22:41
7 h, 14 min Attached Power and Data Grapple Fixture to P6 Truss
40. STS-111
EVA 2
Franklin R. Chang-Diaz
Philippe Perrin
June 11, 2002
15:20
June 11, 2002
20:20[1][2]
5 h, 00 min Attached Mobile Base System to Mobile Transporter
41. STS-111
EVA 3
Franklin R. Chang-Diaz
Philippe Perrin
June 13, 2002
15:16
June 13, 2002
22:33
7 h, 17 min Replace Canadarm2 wrist joint
Attempt Planned Result Turnaround Reason Decision point Weather go % Notes
1 30 May 2002, 7:44:26 pm scrubbed --- weather 40% thunderstorms and electrical activity
2 31 May 2002, 7:21:52 pm scrubbed 0 days, 23 hours, 37 minutes weather 31 May 2002, 9:45 am 80% scrubbed before tanking had begun, concerns of continued bad weather including hail
3 5 Jun 2002, 5:22:48 am success 4 days, 10 hours, 1 minutes initial plans for Monday launch were delayed due to nitrogen valve problems[3]

See also

References

External links


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