Saint Pierre and Miquelon: Wikis

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Territorial Collectivity of
Saint Pierre and Miquelon
Collectivité territoriale de
Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon
Flag Coat of arms
MottoA Mare Labor  (Latin)
"From the Sea, Work"
AnthemLa Marseillaise
Capital
(and largest city)
Saint-Pierre
46°47′N 56°10′W / 46.783°N 56.167°W / 46.783; -56.167
Official language(s) French
Ethnic groups  Basque, Bretons, Normands (French fishermen) [1]
Government Dependent territory
 -  President of France Nicolas Sarkozy
 -  President of the Territorial Council Stéphane Artano
 -  Prefect Jean-Pierre Berçot
Overseas collectivity of France
 -  Ceded by the UK 30 May 1814 
 -  Overseas territory 27 October 1946 
 -  Overseas department 17 July 1976 
 -  Territorial collectivity 11 June 1985 
 -  Overseas collectivity 28 March 2003 
Area
 -  Total 242 km2 (208th)
93.4 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) negligible
Population
 -  July 2009 estimate 7,051[1] (227th)
 -  January 2006 census 6,125 
 -  Density 29.1/km2 (188th)
75.5/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2003 estimate
 -  Total $48.3 million (226th)
Currency Euro () (EUR)
Time zone PMST (UTC-3)
 -  Summer (DST) PMDT (UTC-2)
Internet TLD .pm
Calling code 508
Treaty of Paris (1814).

The Territorial Collectivity of Saint Pierre and Miquelon (pronounced /ˌseɪnt piːˈɛər ænd ˌmɪkəˈlɒn/ in English; French: Collectivité territoriale de Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon, French pronunciation: [sɛ̃ pjɛʁ e mikˈlɔ̃]) is a group of small French islands in the North Atlantic Ocean, the main islands being Saint Pierre and Miquelon, south of the Canadian province of Newfoundland & Labrador. The islands are as close as 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) from Green Island, part of Newfoundland.

The archipelago is the only remnant of the former colonial empire of New France that remains under French control.

Contents

History

The early settlement of St. Pierre and Miquelon, prized by Europeans for their rich fishing grounds, was characterized by periods of conflict between the French and English.

There is evidence of prehistoric inhabitation on the islands (most likely Beothuk). The European settlements on the islands are some of the oldest in the Americas (with the Spanish and Portuguese settlements), dating from at least the early 16th century. At first Basque fishermen only visited the islands seasonally during the fishing season, but by the mid 17th century there were permanent French residents on the islands.

At the end of the 17th and into the early 18th century, British attacks caused the French settlers to abandon the islands, and the British took possession for 50 years (from 1713 to 1763). The French took back the islands in 1763 under the Treaty of Paris (which ceded all of New France to Britain except for Saint Pierre and Miquelon) and settlers returned to live peacefully for 15 years.

French support of the American Revolution led to a British attack on the islands, and the deportation of the French settlers. Possession of St. Pierre and Miquelon passed back and forth between France and Great Britain for the next 38 years, as the islands suffered attacks by both countries, voluntary or forced removal of the island's residents, and upheaval associated with the French Revolution.

France finally took the islands back after Napoleon's second abdication in 1815, after which followed 70 years of prosperity for the French fishing industry and residents on St. Pierre and Miquelon. However, political and economic changes led to a slow decline of the fishing industry after the late 19th century.

In 1920, a 13-year economic boom began on the islands fuelled by the period of Prohibition in the United States, when St. Pierre and Miquelon became prominent bases for alcohol smuggling. This boom ended with the repeal of Prohibition in 1933, after which the economy sank into depression.

During the Second World War, the governor, Gilbert de Bournat, was loyal to the Vichy regime; he had to negotiate financial arrangements with U.S. authorities to obtain loans guaranteed by the French treasury. At the same time, Canada was considering an invasion of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon. Several pretexts were put forward, notably radio broadcasts of Vichy propaganda. It was alleged that the radio was helping German U-Boats on the Grand Banks, though this was never proven. The Canadian Governor General at the time, The Earl of Athlone, never authorised the implementation of the plans.

Under orders from de Gaulle, Admiral Émile Muselier organised the liberation of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon, without the consent or knowledge of the Canadian and U.S. authorities. On 24 December 1941, a Free French flotilla led by the submarine cruiser Surcouf took control of the islands without resistance, and installed Alain Savary as Governor. De Gaulle had a referendum organised, which was favourable to him, and Saint-Pierre and Miquelon thus became one of the first French territories to join Free France. The affair led to a lasting distrust between De Gaulle and Roosevelt.[2]

Politics

The politics of Saint Pierre and Miquelon take place within a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic French overseas collectivity, whereby the President of the Territorial Council is the head of government, and of a multi-party system. Executive power is exercised by the government.

Saint Pierre and Miquelon also sends one deputy to the French National Assembly and one senator to the French Senate.

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Border dispute

In 1992, a maritime boundary dispute with Canada over the delineation of the Exclusive Economic Zone belonging to France was settled by an arbitration court that was set up by Canada and France to resolve the dispute. In the decision, France kept the 12 nautical mile (nmi) (22.2 km, 13.8 mi) territorial sea surrounding the islands and was given an additional 12 nmi (22.2 km, 13.8 mi) contiguous zone as well as a 10.5 nmi (19.4 km, 12.1 mi) wide corridor stretching 188 nmi (370 km, 230 mi) south. The total area in the award was 18% of what France had requested. The boundary dispute had been a flash point for Franco-Canadian relations.

Administrative divisions

Saint Pierre et Miquelon Map.svg

Saint-Pierre and Miquelon is administratively divided into two communes (municipalities), named Miquelon-Langlade and Saint-Pierre.

Geography and environment

Geographic location

Saint Pierre and Miquelon are situated south of Newfoundland in the North Atlantic Ocean. Their distance north-south from Newfoundland is 60 kilometres (32 nmi). The islands are even closer to the long Burin Peninsula, which is situated just 25 kilometres (13 nmi) to the east. In addition, Green Island, which belongs to Newfoundland, is located about halfway between the southern part of Miquelon-Langlade and Newfoundland at 46°52′44″N 56°05′21″W / 46.87889°N 56.08917°W / 46.87889; -56.08917, only 10 kilometres (6 mi) from both Langlade and St. Pierre.[3]

Physical geography

Simulated view of the islands by NASA

Saint Pierre and Miquelon is an archipelago of eight islands, Saint-Pierre (26 km2 or 10 sq mi) and Miquelon-Langlade (total 216 km2 or 83 sq mi) being the major ones. Collectively the area of the islands is 242 km² (93.4 sq mi). The total coastline is 120 kilometres (75 mi) long.

The island of Saint-Pierre is surrounded to the south-east by smaller dependencies, Petit Colombier, Île aux Marins, Île aux Pigeons and Île aux Vainqueurs, and Grand Colombier to the north. Some of these have been previously inhabited at one time or another, but none are permanently inhabited anymore[4].

St. Pierre is separated from Miquelon by a 6 kilometres (3.2 nmi) strait with very fierce currents. Fishermen call this section of ocean "The Mouth of Hell". The waters around these islands are very treacherous, and there have been over 600 shipwrecks along the coasts of the islands.

The island(s) of Miquelon-Langlade consists of three formerly separate islands, Miquelon (110 km2 or 42 sq mi), Langlade (91 km2 or 35 sq mi) and Le Cap. In the 18th century an isthmus of sand formed naturally between Miquelon and Langlade. The isthmus was reinforced by hand with sand and quaternary deposits to what is now an 13 kilometres (8.1 mi) sand dune. Local legend says that the entire isthmus was built around the over 500 wrecks that took place in the area. While the ships using that channel between the islands began to get stranded there and certainly contributed to the formation of the isthmus, the legend may be exaggerated.[5] What was originally the island Miquelon is now also called Grande Miquelon while Petite Miquelon refers to Langlade.[3]

Environment

Landscape of Miquelon

The climate is damp and windy, and winters are harsh and long. Spring and early summer are foggy and cool. Late summer and early fall are sunny.

Seals and other wildlife can be found in the Grand Barachois lagoon of Miquelon. Every spring, whales migrating to Greenland are visible off the coasts of Saint Pierre and Miquelon.

Trilobite fossils have been found on Langlade. There were a number of stone pillars off the island coasts called "L'anse aux Soldats" that have been eroded away and disappeared in the 1970s.[6]

Economy

The islands were dependent upon the cod fishery for the best part of the last four centuries. However, overfishing on the Grand Banks has led Canada to impose a long-term closure of this industry. Since fishing quotas are governed by Canada, Saint-Pierre and Miquelon and the French fishing fleet (whether based out of the islands or out of mainland France) have been seriously affected.

In Saint-Pierre and Miquelon many efforts are being made, with the help of the French government, to diversify the local economy. Tourism, fish farming, crab fishing and agriculture are being developed.

The islands have issued their own stamps since 1885 to the present, except for a period between 1 April 1978 to 3 February 1986 when French stamps were used.[7] Domestic French postal rates apply to mail between mainland France and the islands. The islands' French postal code is 97500.

Currency

Between 1890 and 1965, the islanders used the Canadian dollar, and the Saint Pierre and Miquelon franc, which was equal to the French franc until 1945, then to the CFA franc between 1945 and 1960, and then to the French new franc until 1965, when the French franc was established, circulating alongside the Canadian dollar on the islands. Since 2002, the French franc has been replaced with the euro. Both the euro and the Canadian dollar are used on the islands.

Demography

The population of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon at the 2006 local census was 6,125 inhabitants. 5,509 of these lived in the commune (municipality) of Saint-Pierre and the other 615 in the commune of Miquelon-Langlade (all on Miquelon proper, and none on Langlade Island).

Langlade currently has no year-round residents, since its sole inhabitant, Charles Lafitte,[8] died in July 2006. Langlade is a summer retreat for many inhabitants of Saint-Pierre, when its population can swell up to 1,000.

Most of the people by ethnicity are whites of mostly French descent (incl. Basque, Breton, Norman) with some Newfoundlanders from Canada. Some residents also descend in part from ethnic groups living in other overseas French territories and departments.

Healthcare

There are three health care facilities on the islands.

Hopital Francois Dunan provides basic care and emergency care for residents of both islands.[9] Although a hospital was established on the islands in 1783, the current facility opened in 1968. On Miquelon a smaller medical centre (Centre Médical de Miquelon) provides basic care. Langlade also has a health clinic open in July and August only. For specialized care, residents are flown to St. John's, NF.

Island names

Saint-Pierre is French for Saint Peter, who is a patron saint of fishermen.[10]

The present name of Miquelon was first noted in the form of "Micquelle" in the Basque sailor Martin de Hoyarçabal's navigational pilot for Newfoundland.[11] It has been claimed that the name "Miquelon" is a Basque form of Michael,[12][13][14] but it appears that this is not a usual form in that language. Many Basques speak Spanish as well as their native-tongue, and Miquelon may have been influenced by the Spanish name Miguelón, a form of Miguel meaning "big Michael".

The adjoining island's name of "Langlade" is a corruption of "l'île à l'Anglais" (Englishman's Island).[13]

Culture

French is the official language of the islands. The local accent and many of the words used are similar to the Norman language.

Every year in the summer there is a Basque Festival, with demonstrations of harrijasotzaile (stone heaving), haitzkolari (lumberjack skills), and pelota (a game somewhat like jaï-alaï).

Hockey is very popular in Saint Pierre and Miquelon. Several players from the islands have played on French teams and even participated on the French national hockey team in the Olympics.

Street names are not commonly used on the islands. Directions and locations are commonly given using nicknames and the names of nearby residents.[15]

The only time the guillotine was ever used in North America was in Saint-Pierre in the late 19th century. Joseph Néel was convicted of killing Mr. Coupard on Île aux chiens on 30 December 1888, and executed by guillotine on 24 August 1889. The guillotine had to be shipped from Martinique and it did not arrive in working order. It was very difficult to get anyone to perform the execution; finally a recent immigrant was coaxed into doing the job. This event was the inspiration for the film The Widow of Saint-Pierre (La Veuve de Saint-Pierre) released in 2000. The guillotine is now in a museum in Saint-Pierre.

The islands are the home of the Roman Catholic Vicariate Apostolic of Iles Saint Pierre and Miquelon.

Military

France is responsible for the defense of the islands.

Transportation

While Saint Pierre and Miquelon has no railway, it has 114 km (70.8 miles) of highways plus 45 km (28 miles) of unpaved roads. Its only major harbour is Saint-Pierre. The dependency has no merchant marine and two airports; the runway at Saint-Pierre Airport is 1,800 metres (5,910 ft) long, and at Miquelon Airport, 1,000 metres (3,280 ft).

A regular ferry service is provided between Saint-Pierre and the town of Fortune, Newfoundland by the Atlantic Jet, a high speed catamaran. The ferry does not carry vehicles.[16]

Air transport is provided by Air Saint-Pierre which connects Saint-Pierre with Miquelon and several Canadian cities. Travel to France involves a plane change, normally in Montreal. The Saint-Pierre - Miquelon route is one of the shortest scheduled airline routes in the world in terms of distance or flight duration.

Saint Pierre and Miquelon uses standard French vehicle registration plates, rather than issuing plates in the format of six inches high by twelve inches wide used by all other jurisdictions in North America. However, the islands do not follow the standard French numbering system. Until 1952, cars were simply numbered from 1 onwards, without any code to identify them as being from Saint Pierre and Miquelon. Beginning in 1952, they had serial numbers followed by the letters SPM, e.g. 9287 SPM. Since 2000, all numbers have begun with the letters SPM followed by a serial number and serial letter, e.g. SPM 1 A.[17] Vehicles are mainly French or European. North American vehicles can also be found in recent years.

Communications

Saint Pierre and Miquelon has four radio stations, all of them on the FM band (the last stations converted from AM band in 2004). Three of the stations are on St. Pierre, two of which are owned by RFO, along with one RFO station on Miquelon. At night, these stations broadcast France-Inter. The other station (Radio Atlantique) is an affiliate of Radio France Internationale. The nation is linked to North America and Europe by satellite communications for telephone and television service.

The department of Saint Pierre and Miquelon are served by three television stations: Télé St. Pierre et Miquelon (call letters FQN) on Channel 8, with a repeater on Channel 31, and Tempo on Channel 6. While Saint Pierre and Miquelon use the French SECAM-K1 standard for television broadcasts, the local telecommunications provider (SPM Telecom) carries many North American television stations and cable channels, converted from North America's NTSC standard. In addition, Télé St. Pierre et Miquelon is carried on Shaw Direct satellite and most digital cable services in Canada, converted to NTSC.

SPM Telecom also is the department's main Internet Service Provider, with its internet service being named "Cheznoo" (a play on Chez-Nous, French for "Our Place"). SPM Telecom also offers cellular phone and mobile phone service (for phones that adhere to the GSM standard). SPM Telecom uses the GSM 900MHz band[18], which is different from the GSM 850MHz and 1900MHz bands used in the rest of North America. Speedtest.net reports that Saint Pierre and Miquelon has a higher average download speed than any other country in North America[19].

The islands are a separate country among radio amateurs. They also have a separate ITU prefix, FP. Therefore St Pierre and Miquelon are visited by radio amateurs every year, mainly from the US, who activate the islands on amateur radio frequencies. These activities have made the islands well known among radio amateurs all over the world as the geographic location of St Pierre and Miquelon gives a very good takeoff for shortwave communication all over the world.

Time zone

The UTC-3 timezone is used in Saint Pierre and Miquelon. Also, Daylight Savings Time is observed according to the North American schedule, instead of the European schedule used in Metropolitan France.

The following tables compares the time of day, when standard time (non-summer time) is in effect, for various locales with Saint Pierre and Miquelon.[20]:

Locale Time of Day Common Time Zone Name Coordinated Universal Time
Paris, FR 4pm Central European Time (CET) UTC+1
London, UK 3pm Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) UTC
Nuuk (formerly Godthåb), GL Noon Western Greenland Time (WGT) UTC-3
Saint Pierre and Miquelon Noon Saint Pierre & Miquelon Standard Time (PMST) UTC-3
St. John's, NL 11:30am Newfoundland Standard Time (NST) UTC-3:30
Halifax, NS 11am Atlantic Standard Time (AST) UTC-4
New York, NY 10am Eastern Standard Time (EST) UTC-5

Notable persons

See also

References

  1. ^ a b CIA factbook: Saint Pierre and Miquelon
  2. ^ Churchill, Winston S., Second World War: The Grand Alliance. p.666
  3. ^ a b Janzen, Olaf Uwe (2001). "St. Pierre et Miquelon". Memorial University of Newfoundland. http://www.heritage.nf.ca/exploration/pierre_miquelon.html. Retrieved 29 August 2007. 
  4. ^ From http://www.st-pierre-et-miquelon.com/english/index.php
  5. ^ Transport Miquelonnais Society (tour company)
  6. ^ "La Géologie des îles Saint-Pierre et Miquelon" (in French). Encyclopédie des îles Saint-Pierre & Miquelon. Miquelon Conseil. Archived from the original on 11 January 2006. http://web.archive.org/web/20060111105117/http://www.grandcolombier.com/2003-geographie/geologie/index.html. 
  7. ^ "ST. PIERRE ET MIQUELON". Online Catalogue. Stanley Gibbons. http://www.stanleygibbons.com/mc/search_results.asp?page=results&subcountry=769&pRow=999&xFilter=0&country=573. Retrieved 1 December 2007. 
  8. ^ Charles Lafitte was widely known on the islands as "de Gaulle", and lived as a hermit on Langlade for many years with his dogs.
  9. ^ [1]
  10. ^ "PATRON SAINT INDEX TOPIC: fishermen, anglers". Catholic Community Forum. Archived from the original on 20 February 2007. http://web.archive.org/web/20070220040300/http://www.catholic-forum.com/Saints/pst00290.htm. 
  11. ^ Hoyarçabal, Martin de: Les voyages aventureux du Capitaine Martin de Hoyarsal, habitant du çubiburu (Bordeaux, France, 1579)
  12. ^ The Basques of Saint Pierre and Miquelon, Buber's Basque Page dated 30 April 2006 (accessed 27 September 2007).
  13. ^ a b Saint-Pierre & Miquelon Tourism Agencies in Saint Pierre et Miquelon, Miquelon Consulting, 2006 (accessed 27 September 2007)
  14. ^ Cormier, Marc Albert: Toponymie ancienne et origine des noms Saint-Pierre, Miquelon et Langlade. The Northern Mariner Vol. 7, Ottawa, 1997. pp 1:29-44
  15. ^ Emile SASCO. "Historique des Rues de Saint-Pierre" (in French). Encyclopédie des îles Saint-Pierre & Miquelon. Miquelon Conseil. http://www.grandcolombier.com/histoire/1918-1939-lentre-deux-guerres/historique-des-rues-de-saint-pierre/. 
  16. ^ "SPM Travel Options". Saint-Pierre & Miquelon. http://www.st-pierre-et-miquelon.com/english/comment.php. Retrieved 9 December 2007. 
  17. ^ "French overseas possessions registrations". The Francoplaque License Plate Collectors site. http://plaque.free.fr/f_dom_e.html#SP. Retrieved 9 December 2007. 
  18. ^ http://www.gsmworld.com/roaming/gsminfo/cou_pm.shtml
  19. ^ http://www.speedtest.net/global.php
  20. ^ Date and Time.com. "Saint-Pierre, Saint Pierre and Miquelon". http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/timezone.html?n=730. Retrieved 2009-11-30. 

External links

Government

Tourism

Territorial issues

Miscellanea

Coordinates: 46°47′N 56°12′W / 46.783°N 56.2°W / 46.783; -56.2


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Saint-Pierre and Miquelon article)

From Wikitravel

North America : Saint-Pierre and Miquelon
noframe
Flag
Image:sb-flag.png
Quick Facts
Capital Saint-Pierre
Government self-governing territorial collectivity of France
Currency euro (EUR)
Area 242 sq km
Population 7,026 (July 2006 est.)
Language French (official)
Religion Roman Catholic 99%
Electricity 220V/50Hz [French Outlet] (Some B & B's still have 110V outlets.)
Calling Code +508
Internet TLD .pm
Time Zone UTC -3

Saint-Pierre and Miquelon [1] are a small group of islands in the North Atlantic Ocean, south of Newfoundland and Labrador. First settled by the French in the early 17th century, the islands represent the sole remaining vestige of France's once vast North American possessions.

Map of Saint Pierre and Miquelon
Map of Saint Pierre and Miquelon
  • Saint-Pierre - the smaller island, the only significantly populated town (the capital), and the central area of activity.
  • Miquelon - the larger island (actually three of them, connected by drifted sand) and village, Basque and Acadian history, and a large amount of wildlife, small farming operations and summer homes.

Understand

Saint-Pierre was a site for settlement by the French in the early 17th century, later abandoned under the Treaty of Utrecht, and returned to France in 1763 at the end of the Seven Years War. As well, the islands became a place of refuge for Acadian deportees from Nova Scotia. Saint-Pierre figures frequently in North American British-French relations. As well, it profited heavily from US Prohibition, which did not affect this area, part of France. It was depopulated and repopulated frequently, and now remains the last vestige of Imperial France within North America.

Like its northern neighbour, Newfoundland, it is a key fishing centre close to the Grand Banks, some of the world's richest fishing grounds. However, as in Newfoundland, the decline in cod stocks has seriously affected the fishery. As a result, tourism is becoming increasingly important to the economy. As a travel destination, St-Pierre et Miquelon is ideal for those interested in historical and cultural discovery, eco-tourism and the French language. Beyond its history, Saint-Pierre et Miquelon is a wonderful destination because of its mild refreshing climate, its beautiful landscapes, the quality of the air and the warmth of its inhabitants.

As a part of the European Union, the area has much in common with Europe, but also with its Canadian and American neighbours.

Get in

Despite being part of the European Union, immigration procedures are different. Canadians and Europeans will need passports, and all other nationalities will need passports and/or visas. Check with your local French consulate or embassy. Most travelers are only given a cursory inspection when entering the island of Saint-Pierre.

Template:Expand

By plane

Air service to Saint-Pierre is available via Air Saint-Pierre through:

By car

Travelling by car to Saint-Pierre requires driving through Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, and taking the ferry.

  • From Argentia, take Highway 100 northeast until the TransCanada Highway 1. Take 1 northwest to Highway 210. On 210, head southwest until Highway 220. Take 220 to Fortune.
  • From Port aux Basques, take Highway 470 west to TransCanada Highway 1. Take 1 east until Highway 210. On 210, head southwest until Highway 220. Take 220 to Fortune.

As the island of Newfoundland is home to a moose population of over 100,000, do drive slowly and cautiously, especially when driving at night. Remember that hitting a moose is not like hitting a deer--a moose is a tall beast, and your car will hit its legs, knocking the brunt of its weight into the windshield and you. This is the last thing you want to have happen.

By bus

If you are going through Newfoundland via Port aux Basques, DRL Coachlines Ltd. offers daily scheduled passenger coach services between St. John's & Port Aux Basques on the island. DRL's head office is in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, but they can be reached toll-free at 1-888-738-8091. If you wish to reach their office in St. John's, call 1-709-738-8088.

Another bus service from Port Aux Basques to St. John's is Newhook's Transportation. Call them at 1-709-726-4876.

In either case, you'll need to get off the bus a short time after Clarenville to head southwest towards Fortune and the ferry to Saint-Pierre.

By boat

Marine Atlantic ferry service runs from North Sydney, Nova Scotia, to Port aux Basques, Newfoundland and Labrador (on the west coast of the island of Newfoundland), throughout the year, and to Argentia, Newfoundland and Labrador (about 90km from St. John's), during the summer. The duration of the ride depends on the weather and water conditions, so patience is of the essence. It is advisable to call Marine Atlantic ahead of time to make a reservation (call 1-800-341-7981). If you are bringing a U-haul or something other than a passenger vehicle, you will likely be considered a commercial vehicle. Commercial vehicles can only make reservations by doubling the usual fare. It is cheaper to simply take your number, wait in line and hope for the best.

In general, Marine Atlantic Ferries cater to your every whim, carrying food, alcohol, gift shops, cinemas and sleeping accommodations. There will be lots for you to do.

Once in Newfoundland, drive or take a bus to Fortune (see By car & By bus). From here, you'll leave your car and take the ferry to Saint-Pierre with SPM EXPRESS.

Get around

Given the compact size of Saint-Pierre, it is generally easy to get around on foot. Those intimidated by the town's notorious sloping streets may find a rented scooter may be a more friendly option. There are also a number of taxi services that offer guided tours of Saint-Pierre. Avid renters, be warned that there is less than a handful of rental cars on the island.

The nearby islands of île aux Marins, Langlande, and Miquelon may be accessed via ferry. île aux Marins and Langlade are inhabited only during the summer months and lack amenities such as taxis, hospitals, or internet service. The town of Miquelon is considerably smaller than Saint-Pierre and therefore has fewer hotels, shops, and restaurants.

Talk

The French spoken in Saint-Pierre and Miquelon is very similar to that spoken in Normandy, Brittany, and Paris. The islanders are quite proud of their linguistic heritage.

Due to its proximity to English-speaking Canada, Saint-Pierre has become a popular destination for anglophone students wishing to become immersed in French language and culture.

The islands have a specialized language teaching facility named the FrancoForum, owned and operated by the local government in Saint-Pierre. Staffed by professional French instructors, the institute offers a variety of courses for both students and teachers wishing to improve their fluency.

The FrancoForum is best known for hosting Le Programme Frecker, a 3-month French immersion program offered to students at Memorial University in Newfoundland, Canada. The program, which began in 1975, was originally housed in a small building at the center of town. In 2000, an agreement was reached with the Conseil Général in Saint-Pierre to relocate the program to the newly built FrancoForum.

Buy

Like the rest of France, the official currency is the euro, but in Saint-Pierre, it is also common for Canadian & American dollars to be accepted by merchants. Also, you will find that nearly everything is on the expensive side, with the notable exceptions of wine and cigarettes.

Eat

French cuisine is standard in Saint-Pierre and Miquelon. Those who love seafood should look into the Seafood Festival that is held every year in mid-August in the small town of Miquelon.

Sleep

Probably one of the best hotels in Saint Pierre is the Hotel Ile de France which offers comfortable rooms and wireless internet service along with a restaurant and bar. It is located right in the centre of town at 6, rue Maître Georges Lefèvre.
Hotel Ile de France in downtown St. Pierre
Hotel Ile de France in downtown St. Pierre
.

Another 3 star hotel in Saint Pierre is L'Hôtel Robert down by the harbour—a couple blocks west of where the Ferry from Newfoundland docks. It features a small museum dedicated to the Prohibition Era and a souvenir shop.

Stay safe

There is very little crime in Saint-Pierre and Miquelon and this destination should be considered one of the safest possible in North America.

Stay healthy

Saint-Pierre and Miquelon pose very few health threats. Be warned that the weather is often very chilly and a sweater comes in handy, even during the summer months. If a serious injury should occur, there is a small hospital located in the town of Saint-Pierre. Patients who require special treatment are usually sent to larger, better-equipped hospitals in Canada.

Contact

Comité Régional du Tourisme (Tourism Office)

Place du Général de Gaulle BP 4274 F97500 Saint-Pierre et Miquelon

Tel. + 508 41 02 00 Fax + 508 41 33 55

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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

Proper noun

Saint Pierre and Miquelon

  1. Overseas territory of France off the eastern coast of Canada. Official name: Territorial collectivity of Saint Pierre and Miquelon.

Translations

  • Breton: Sant-Pêr-ha-Mikelon
  • Danish: Saint Pierre og Miquelon
  • Dutch: Saint-Pierre en Miquelon
  • Esperanto: Sent-Piero kaj Mikelono
  • Finnish: Saint-Pierre ja Miquelon
  • French: Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon
  • German: Sankt Pierre und Miquelon
  • Greek: Σαιν Πιέρ και Μικελόν, 'Αγιος Πέτρος και Μικελόν
  • Italian: Saint-Pierre e Miquelon
  • Japanese: サンピエール・ミクロン ja(ja) (sanpiēru mikuron)
  • Macedonian: Свети Пјер и Микелон (Svéti Pjer i Mikelón) m.
  • Polish: Saint-Pierre i Miquelon
  • Portuguese: São Pedro e Miquelon
  • Romanian: Saint Pierre &#351i Miquelon
  • Russian: Сен-Пьер и Микелон
  • Spanish: San Pedro y Miquelón
  • Swedish: Saint Pierre och Miquelon

See also


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