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Saka
Spoken in medieval Khotan, Tumushuke
Language extinction by 10th century AD
Language family Indo-European
Language codes
ISO 639-1 None
ISO 639-2
ISO 639-3

Saka or Sakan is a name for two extinct Iranian languages spoken in Xinjiang, China, which share features with modern Wakhi and Pashto. They are identified with the cities of Khotan and Tumxuk, namely Khotanese language and Tumshuqese language. Many Prakrit terms were borrowed from the Khotanese language into the Tocharian languages.[1]

Contents

See also

References

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Notes

  1. ^ Litvinsky 1999: 432

Sources

  • Litvinsky, Boris Abramovich; Vorobyova-Desyatovskaya, M.I (1999). "Religions and religious movements". History of civilizations of Central Asia. Motilal Banarsidass. pp. 421–448. ISBN 8120815408.  

Further reading

  • Emmerick, R. E., & Pulleyblank, E. G. (1993). A Chinese text in Central Asian Brahmi script: new evidence for the pronunciation of Late Middle Chinese and Khotanese. Roma: Istituto italiano per il Medio ed Estremo Oriente.

Sakan
Spoken in medieval Khotan, Tumushuke
Language extinction by 10th century AD
Language family Indo-European
Language codes
ISO 639-1 None
ISO 639-2
ISO 639-3

Sakan is a name of two extinct Iranian languages which were spoken in Xinjiang, China. They are identified with the cities of Khotan and Tumxuk, namely Khotanese language and Tumshuqese language. Many Prakrit terms were borrowed from the Khotanese language into the Tocharian languages.[1]

Contents

See also

References

Notes

  1. Litvinsky 1999: 432

Sources

  • Litvinsky, Boris Abramovich; Vorobyova-Desyatovskaya, M.I (1999). "Religions and religious movements". History of civilizations of Central Asia: 421-448, Motilal Banarsidass. ISBN 8120815408. 

Further reading

  • Emmerick, R. E., & Pulleyblank, E. G. (1993). A Chinese text in Central Asian Brahmi script: new evidence for the pronunciation of Late Middle Chinese and Khotanese. Roma: Istituto italiano per il Medio ed Estremo Oriente.

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