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Coordinates: 36°39′46″N 121°36′23″W / 36.66278°N 121.60639°W / 36.66278; -121.60639

Salinas Municipal Airport
Salinas Airport..jpg
IATA: SNSICAO: KSNSFAA: SNS
Summary
Airport type Public
Owner City of Salinas
Serves Salinas, California
Elevation AMSL 85 ft / 26 m
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
8/26 6,004 1,830 Asphalt
13/31 4,825 1,471 Asphalt
14/32 1,900 579 Asphalt
Helipads
Number Length Surface
ft m
H1 90 27 Asphalt/Concrete
Statistics (2007)
Aircraft operations 77,896
Based aircraft 229
Source: Federal Aviation Administration[1]
Salinas MAP is located in California
Salinas MAP
Location of Salinas Municipal Airport, California

Salinas Municipal Airport (IATA: SNSICAO: KSNSFAA LID: SNS) is a city-owned public-use airport located three miles (5 km) southeast of the central business district of Salinas, a city in Monterey County, California, United States.[1]

Contents

Facilities and aircraft

Salinas Municipal Airport covers 605 acres (245 ha) which contain three asphalt paved runways: 8/26 measuring 6,004 x 150 ft. (1,830 x 46 m), 13/31 at 4,825 x 150 ft. (1,471 x 46 m), and 14/32 at 1,900 x 50 ft. (579 x 15 m). It also has one helipad with a 90 x 90 ft. (27 x 27 m) asphalt/concrete surface.[1]

For the 12-month period ending June 30, 2007, the airport had 77,896 aircraft operations, an average of 213 per day: 97% general aviation, 2% air taxi and 1% military. At that time there were 229 aircraft based at this airport: 70% single-engine, 21% multi-engine, 3% jet and 6% helicopter.[1]

History

The airfield was opened in June 1942 during World War II as Salinas Army Air Base (AAB). It was used by the United States Army Air Forces Fourth Air Force as a subpost to Fort Ord during the war. Its mission was that of an incoming personnel processing center and a training field for Army pilots in reconnaissance and observation duties in various aircraft from light observation planes to medium bombers. The Air Transport Command also used the field and had an air freight terminal here for transshipment of cargo.

In January 1944, the Air University Army Air Forces School of Applied Tactics (AAFSAT) moved its 481st Night Fighter Operational Training Group from Orlando Army Airbase, Florida to California and assigned its 348th Night Fighter Squadron to the airport. Flying P-70s and A-20 Havoc training fighters, the squadron trained training replacement pilots at the airport until the end of the war in September 1945.

With the end of the war, the base was declared excess to requirements and returned to civil control.[2]

California International Airshow

Salinas Airport is the location of the annual California International Airshow, set at various times from early August to early October. The air show often features top-tier aerobatic teams such as the Canadian Forces Snowbirds, U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds and the U.S. Navy Blue Angels, with the proceeds going to local charities.

See also

References

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

  • Maurer, Maurer (1983). Air Force Combat Units Of World War II. Maxwell AFB, Alabama: Office of Air Force History. ISBN 0892010924.
  • Mauer, Mauer (1969), Combat Squadrons of the Air Force, World War II, Air Force Historical Studies Office, Maxwell AFB, Alabama. ISBN 0892010975
  • Shaw, Frederick J. (2004), Locating Air Force Base Sites History’s Legacy, Air Force History and Museums Program, United States Air Force, Washington DC, 2004.
  1. ^ a b c d FAA Airport Master Record for SNS (Form 5010 PDF), effective 2007-12-20
  2. ^ "Historic California Posts, Salinas Army Air Base". The California State Military Museum. http://www.militarymuseum.org/SalinasAAB.html. Retrieved 2008-04-19. 

External links

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