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Samuel Hitchcock (March 23, 1755 – November 20, 1813) was an attorney and judge in Vermont.

Hitchcock was born in Brimfield, Massachusetts and attended Harvard College in 1777. He engaged in private practice in Burlington, Vermont, from 1786-87, and was then the state's attorney for Chittenden County, Vermont until 1790, when he became the first Attorney General of Vermont until 1793. He served simultaneously, from 1789-93, as a member of the Vermont House of Representatives.

He received a recess appointment from President George Washington on September 3, 1793 to a seat vacated by Nathaniel Chipman on the United States District Court for the District of Vermont. Hitchcock was formally nominated on December 27, 1793, confirmed by the United States Senate on December 30, 1793, and received his commission on January 28, 1794. On February 18, 1801, Hitchcock was nominated by President John Adams to a seat on the newly created United States circuit court for the Second Circuit, created by 2 Stat. 89, also known as the Midnight Judges Act. Hitchcock was confirmed to this seat by the Senate on February 20, 1801, and received the same day. However, his service terminated on July 1, 1802, due to abolition of the court with the repeal of the act that created it. Hitchcock thereafter returned to private practice in Burlington, Vermont and Vergennes, Vermont until his death in Burlington.

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Legal offices
Preceded by
Nathaniel Chipman
Judge of the U.S. District Court for the District of Vermont
September 3, 1793 – February 20, 1801
Succeeded by
Elijah Paine
Preceded by
Newly created seat
Judge of the U.S. Circuit Court for the third circuit
February 20, 1801 – July 1, 1802
Succeeded by
Seat abolished







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