Satoshi Kon: Wikis

  
  

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Satoshi Kon
Born October 12, 1963 (1963-10-12) (age 46)
Kushiro, Hokkaidō, Japan
Occupation Film director and screenwriter
Years active 1997–present (as director)

Satoshi Kon (今 敏 Kon Satoshi ?, born October 12, 1963) is a Japanese director of anime films. Kon started his career as a manga artist and editor in Young Magazine, and then made his screenwriting debut with "Magnetic Rose", a section of the anthology film Memories. Kon made his directorial debut film, Perfect Blue, in 1997, followed by Millennium Actress, Tokyo Godfathers, Paprika and the television series Paranoia Agent. A fifth film, The Dream Machine, is also in production.[1] All of his works as a director have been made by Studio Madhouse, where he is a staff director along with Rintaro and Yoshiaki Kawajiri. He is a founder and part of the 15-member steering committee of the Japan Animation Creators Association (JAniCA) labor group.[2]

Contents

Biography

Early career

Satoshi Kon is a film director from Kushiro, Hokkaidō, Japan. Kon attended Musashino College of the Arts and intended to become a painter.[1] After college, he worked with Katsuhiro Otomo on the manga World Apartment Horror.[1] Kon entered the anime industry by working as set designer for Roujin Z (1991), for which Otomo was the screenwriter and mechanical designer.[1] Kon's early work was strongly influenced by Otomo due to Kon's experience with him.[1] Afterwards, Kon made his screenwriting debut with "Magnetic Rose", a section of the anthology film Memories.[1]

Directorial work

In 1997, Satoshi Kon released his directorial debut film Perfect Blue, which was turned into a feature film from an original video animation in the middle of production.[1] His next film, Millennium Actress, was released in 2001 to several film festivals and won numerous awards.[1] Having created two films that blend dreams and reality, Kon decided to work on a more linear and traditional story and directed Tokyo Godfathers, his only film to date that doesn't deal with subjective reality.[1] After creating the television series Paranoia Agent, Kon finished work on Paprika, a feature-length film that received a wide release to cinemas worldwide in 2007.

Filmography

Writer

Director

Animator

References

External links








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