Scavenger: Wikis

  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Did you know ...


More interesting facts on Scavenger

Include this on your site/blog:

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sarcophaga nodosa, a species of flesh fly feeding on decaying meat

Scavenging, or necrophagy, is a carnivorous feeding behaviour in which a predator consumes corpses or carrion that were not killed to be eaten by the predator or others of its species. Scavengers play an important role in the ecosystem by contributing to the decomposition of dead animal remains. Decomposers complete this process, by consuming the remains left by scavengers.

Well known scavengers include vultures, burying beetles, blowflies, yellowjackets, and raccoons. Many large carnivores that hunt regularly, such as hyenas and lions, will scavenge if given the chance or use their size and ferocity to intimidate the original hunters.

Animals which consume feces, such as dung beetles, are referred to as coprovores. Animals which primarily consume dead plants are referred to as detritivores. The eating of carrion from the same species is referred to as cannibalism.

Contents

As a human behaviour

Men scavenging a dead horse during World War II (at the end of the Battle of Berlin), on Manfred-von-Richthofen-Straße in Tempelhof borough, 1945

In humans, necrophagy is a taboo in most societies. In the Qur'an slanderers are stigmatized as those who eat the flesh of the dead body of the person they slander. The Aghori, a Hindu sect known to live in graveyards, according to a Persian source and nineteenth century British accounts, were necrophagous. There have been many instances in history, especially in war times, where necrophagy was a survival behavior.

In 2004, Dennis Bramble and Daniel Lieberman proposed that early humans were scavengers that used stone tools to harvest meat off carcasses and to open bones. They proposed that humans specialized in long-distance running to compete with other scavengers in reaching carcasses. It has been suggested that such an adaptation ensured a food supply that made large brains possible.

The eating of human meat, a practice known as anthropophagy (and known more commonly as cannibalism), is extremely taboo in almost every culture.

Occupation

Scavenger appears as an occupation in the 1911 Census of England and Wales. This job title was used to describe someone who cleans the streets, removes refuse, generally a workman employed by the local public health authority. The name is properly "scavager" or "scaveger", an official who was concerned with the receipt of custom duties and the inspection (scavage) of imported goods. The "scavagers" are found with such officials of the City of London as an aleconner or beadle. These officials seem to have been charged also with the cleaning of the streets, and the name superseded the older rakyer for those who performed this duty.[1]

Other

A Scavenger can also refer to someone who is a member of the Scavenger Recycle Network. They are a group of like minded people who live by the ethos of giving away their unwanted/redundant possessions to others who need/want them rather than dumping them in landfill sites.

Gallery

References

  1. ^ 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica
  • Merriam-Webster's Dictionary
  • Smith TM, Smith RL (2006) Elements of Ecology. Sixth edition. Benjamin Cummings, San Francisco, CA.
  • Chase, et al. The Scavenger Handbook. Bramblewood Press, Santa Barbara, CA.
  • Rufus, Anneli and Lawson, Kristan. The Scavengers' Manifesto. Tarcher, New York.

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

SCAVENGER, now one who cleans the streets, removes refuse, generally a workman employed by the local public health authority (see Public Health). The name is properly "scavager" or "scaveger" (the n being intrusive as in "passenger" and "messenger"), an official who was concerned with the receipt of custom duties and the inspection (scavage) of imported goods. The "scavagers" are found with such officials of the City of London as aleconners, beadles, &c., in the Liber Albus (Munimenta Gildhallae Londoniensis, ed. Riley). These officials seem to have been charged also with the cleaning of the streets, and the name superseded the older rakyer for those who performed this duty. Skeat takes "scavage" to be a Low French corruption of "showage," spelled variously as schewage, scevage, &c., and, therefore, to be derived from "show," to exhibit for inspection.

1 The view that he was consul again in 108 is disproved by Bloch (see bibliog.).


<< Quintus Terentius Scaurus

Scavenger's Daughter >>


Simple English

Redirecting to Carnivore








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message