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Scrambled eggs
Scrambled eggs with bacon

Scrambled eggs is a dish made from beaten whites and yolks of eggs (usually chicken). Beaten eggs are put into a hot greased pan and stirred frequently, forming curds as they coagulate.

Contents

Sample preparation

Raw eggs are whisked to blend the egg white and yolk into a homogeneous liquid. Liquids such as stock, cream, butter, milk, water, or oil may be added during the whisking to create a softer texture. The amount of liquid added is typically about 2 tbsp (30mL) liquid per egg. Salt, pepper, or other seasonings can be added to taste.

The whisked eggs are poured into a hot greased pan and coagulate almost immediately. The heat is turned down to low and the eggs are constantly stirred as they cook. The pan and the stirring implement, if kept in constant motion, will create small and soft curds. The lower the heat and the more constant the movement, the creamier the end product.

Once the liquid has mostly set, additional ingredients such as ham, herbs or cheese (which have been warmed) may be folded in over low heat, just until incorporated. The eggs should be slightly undercooked when removed from heat, since the eggs will continue to set. If this technique is followed, the eggs should be moist in texture with a creamy consistency. If any liquid is seeping from the eggs, this is a sign of under cooking or adding overcooked high-moisture vegetables.

Other methods of preparation

A double boiler may be used if cooking at low heat is desired. Cook in the same method as described above using the double boiler or au Bain Marie[1] as the heating source, which will not need adjustment as the direct heating method would. Cooking by this method will prevent the eggs from browning while being cooked. This method was used in the "old classical kitchen" and guarantees the eggs are always cooked perfectly, but it is extremely time-consuming.[1] Scrambled eggs may also be made in a stove by placing the ingredients in a metal bowl and alternately cooking and whisking until the desired consistency is achieved. Various health movements have led to the increased popularity of scrambled egg whites alone.

It is also possible to make scrambled eggs in a microwave oven, by cooking the beaten egg mixture for short bursts, stopping regularly to stir. This allows rapid preparation, but care is required to avoid overcooking and the resulting texture may be inferior to a more traditional preparation method.

Another technique for cooking creamy scrambled eggs is to pipe steam into eggs with butter via a steam wand (as found on an espresso machine).[2]

Serving options

Classical haute cuisine preparation calls for serving the dish in a deep silver dish. They can also be presented in small croustades made from hollowed-out brioche or tartlets.[1] When eaten for breakfast, scrambled eggs often accompany toast, hash browns, pancakes, bacon, ham or sausages. Popular condiments served with scrambled eggs are ketchup, hot sauce and Worcestershire sauce.

Variations of scrambled egg dishes

  • scrambled eggs à l'arlésienne - with courgette (zucchini) pulp and a concentrated garlic-flavored tomato fondue served in hollowed-out courgettes and sprinkled with Parmesan cheese.
  • scrambled eggs with sucuk or pastırma;Sucuklu yumurta and Pastırmalı yumurta respectively - Scrambled eggs are mixed with Turkish beef sausages. It is cooked in a sahan with butter or olive oil. Some tomato can be added. In Turkey it is eaten for breakfast.
  • migas - a Tex-Mex dish (not to be confused with the Iberian dish of the same name) consisting of scrambled eggs augmented with strips of Mexican tortilla, to which vegetables and meat may be added.

See also

Notes

Works cited

  • Escoffier, Georges Auguste. Escoffier: The Complete Guide to the Art of Modern Cookery. Translated by H. L. Cracknell and R.J. Kaufmann. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 2002
  • FoodMayhem.com. Chef Jody Williams Shows Me How to Steam Scramble Eggs. New York: FoodMayhem.com, 2009.
  • McGee, Harold. On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen. New York: Scribner, 2004.
  • Robuchon, Joël, Members of the Gastronomic Committee. Larousse Gastronomique. New York: Clarkson Potter/Publishers, 2001.
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Scrambled eggs is a dish made from beaten whites and yolks of eggs (usually chicken). Beaten eggs are put into a hot greased pan and stirred frequently, forming curds as they coagulate.

Contents

Sample preparation

Raw eggs are whisked to blend the egg white and yolk into a homogeneous liquid. Liquids such as stock, cream, butter, milk, water, or oil may be added during the whisking to create a softer texture. The amount of liquid added is typically about 2 tbsp (30 mL) liquid per egg. Salt, pepper, or other seasonings can be added to taste.

The whisked eggs are poured into a hot greased pan and coagulate almost immediately. The heat is turned down to low and the eggs are constantly stirred as they cook. The pan and the stirring implement, if kept in constant motion, will create small and soft curds. The lower the heat and the more constant the movement, the creamier the end product.

Once the liquid has mostly set, additional ingredients such as ham, herbs or cheese (which have been warmed) may be folded in over low heat, just until incorporated. The eggs should be slightly undercooked when removed from heat, since the eggs will continue to set. If this technique is followed, the eggs should be moist in texture with a creamy consistency. If any liquid is seeping from the eggs, this is a sign of under cooking or adding overcooked high-moisture vegetables.

Other methods of preparation

A double boiler may be used if cooking at low heat is desired. Cook in the same method as described above using the double boiler or au Bain Marie[1] as the heating source, which will not need adjustment as the direct heating method would. Cooking by this method will prevent the eggs from browning while being cooked. This method was used in the "old classical kitchen" and guarantees the eggs are always cooked perfectly, but it is extremely time-consuming.[1] Scrambled eggs may also be made in a stove by placing the ingredients in a metal bowl and alternately cooking and whisking until the desired consistency is achieved. Various health movements have led to the increased popularity of scrambled egg whites alone.

It is also possible to make scrambled eggs in a microwave oven, by cooking the beaten egg mixture for short bursts, stopping regularly to stir. This allows rapid preparation, but care is required to avoid overcooking and the resulting texture may be inferior to a more traditional preparation method.

Another technique for cooking creamy scrambled eggs is to pipe steam into eggs with butter via a steam wand (as found on an espresso machine).[2]

Serving options

Classical haute cuisine preparation calls for serving the dish in a deep silver dish. They can also be presented in small croustades made from hollowed-out brioche or tartlets.[1] When eaten for breakfast, scrambled eggs often accompany toast, hash browns, pancakes, bacon, ham or sausages. Popular condiments served with scrambled eggs are ketchup, hot sauce and Worcestershire sauce.

Variations of scrambled egg dishes

  • scrambled eggs with sucuk or pastırma; Sucuklu yumurta and Pastırmalı yumurta respectively - Scrambled eggs are mixed with Turkish beef sausages, or dried cured beef. It is cooked in a sahan with butter or olive oil. Some tomato can be added. In Turkey and Egypt it is eaten regularly for breakfast.
  • migas - a Tex-Mex dish (not to be confused with the Iberian dish of the same name) consisting of scrambled eggs augmented with strips of Mexican tortilla, to which vegetables and meat may be added.

See also

Notes

Works cited

  • Escoffier, Georges Auguste. Escoffier: The Complete Guide to the Art of Modern Cookery. Translated by H. L. Cracknell and R.J. Kaufmann. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 2002
  • FoodMayhem.com. Chef Jody Williams Shows Me How to Steam Scramble Eggs. New York: FoodMayhem.com, 2009.
  • McGee, Harold. On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen. New York: Scribner, 2004.
  • Robuchon, Joël, Members of the Gastronomic Committee. Larousse Gastronomique. New York: Clarkson Potter/Publishers, 2001.

External links

  • Scrambled Eggs The biggest scrambled eggs recipe database on planet Earth.


Simple English


Scrambled eggs is a dish made from beaten whites and yolks of eggs (usually chicken). The dish often contains other ingredients. Cream, butter, milk, water or oil (used in China) will dilute the egg proteins to create a softer texture.[1]

Contents

Sample recipe

The eggs and a large piece of butter are put into a saucepan over a low heat. The egg whites and egg yolks are then "scrambled" or mixed together. The mixture should be mixed together all the time they are being cooked.

When cooked a little créme frâiche is added. This is because the eggs will be hot enough to carry on cooking themselves. Adding a cool liquid will stop the eggs from overcooking. Some salt and pepper or other seasoning can be added to taste as well.

In the home the eggs can be mixed together first and then poured into a pan. The créme frâiche does not need to be added if the eggs will be eaten almost straight away.

Properly made, the eggs should be moist and creamy consistency. If any liquid is coming from the eggs, it means the eggs have been overcook or that the add the vegetables were undercooked.[2]

Other methods of preparation

Using a double boiler or Bain Marie means that the heat is constant, and does not to be adjusted to make sure the eggs do not brown or burn.[3] [4] The baine marie method is slower than cooking directly in a pan over a heat but makes it easier to cook the eggs perfectly.[5] The eggs must be taken out of the bain marie when cooked, otherwise they will carry on cooking and spoil.

Scrambled eggs may also be made in a microwave oven by put the ingredients in a glass bowl and cooking for 30 seconds then whisking, then cooking and whisking again until the desired consistency is achieved.

Variations of Scrambled Egg Dishes

Many things can be added to scrambled eggs. Often the end result can have a different name, for example:

  • scrambled eggs à l'arlésienne (Scrambled eggs as made in the town of Arles, France)- add the diced, cooked pulp of courgettes (zucchini), a little garlic, and tomato fondue. Put the cooked eggand vegetable mixture into the hollowed, cooked courgettes shells, on an oiled gratin dish sprinkled with Parmesan cheese and brown the oven.[6]
  • scrambled eggs à l'américaine scrambled eggs in the American way - Add cubes of smoked bacon fried in butter to eggs. [7]
  • scrambled eggs Rossini named after the composer Rossini- Cook some scrambled eggs. Sauté some thin slices of foie gras in butter. Cook some sliced truffle in butter. Plate the scrambled eggs on a serving dish, garnish with foie gras and truffles, then coat with a very reduced Madeira demi-glace sauce.[8]

Other pages

Other Websites

Notes

  1. McGee, 91
  2. McBride, 887-888
  3. Escoffier, 157
  4. McBride 888
  5. Escoffier, 157
  6. Robuchon, 451
  7. Robuchon, 17
  8. Robuchon, 998

Works Cited

  • Escoffier, Georges Auguste. Escoffier: The Complete Guide to the Art of Modern Cookery. Translated by H. L. Cracknell and R.J. Kaufmann. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 2002.
  • McGee, Harold. On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen. New York: Scribner, 2004.
  • Robuchon, Joël, Members of the Gastronomic Committee. Larousse Gastronomique. New York: Clarkson Potter/Publishers, 2001.


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