The Full Wiki

Advertisements

More info on Scribner’s Monthly

Scribner’s Monthly: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

Advertisements

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For the similarly named periodical, see Scribner's Magazine.
Scribner's Monthly
First issue
The first issue of Scribner's Monthly from November 1870.
Editor J. G. Holland
Categories Pictorial, literature
Frequency Monthly
First issue November 1870
Company Scribner & Co.
Country United States of America
Based in New York

Scribner's Monthly: An Illustrated Magazine for the People was an American literary periodical published from 1870 until 1881.

Contents

History

Charles Scribner I, Andrew Armstrong, Arthur Peabody, Edward Seymour, Josiah Gilbert Holland, and Roswell Smith established "Scribner & Co." on July 19, 1870 to start on the publication of Scribner's Monthly.[1] Scribner's Monthly absorbed the second incarnation of Putnam's Monthly Magazine of American Literature, Science and Art.[2] The first issue of the newly formed periodical was published in November of that year. In April 1881, Charles Scribner II sold his share of the Scribner & Co. company to Roswell Smith. The name of the magazine and the company were retooled, dropping Scribner or Scribner's out of anything. Scribner's Monthly was changed to The Century Magazine and Scribner & Co. was changed to Century Company. Charles Scribner II was unable to launch a competing magazine for five years.[1] Charles Scribner I announced to a Times reporter that they would make a new monthly publication "as soon as the necessary arrangments could be perfected." Charles Scribner also announced that the editor would be Edward Burlingame, the son of Anson Burlingame, who was already connected to the publishing house as a literary advisor. Charles Scribner also noted that the magazine would not be a revivial of the formerly published Scribner's Monthly.[3]

Contributors

Truman C. Everts's Thirty-Seven Days of Peril was also published within the pages of Scribner's Monthly.[4]

Notes

  1. ^ a b "Charles Scribner's Sons: An Illustrated Chronology". 65 Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 United States of America: Princeton University Library. November 8, 2002. http://library.princeton.edu/libraries/firestone/rbsc/aids/scribner/index.html. Retrieved Friday, August 28, 2009.  
  2. ^ Mark Ockerbloom, John. "Scribner's". The Online Books Page. http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/serial?id=scribners. Retrieved Friday, August 28, 2009.  
  3. ^ "A New Scribner's Magazine" (PDF). The New York Times. The New York Times (620 8th Ave, New York, NY 10018: The New York Times Company): p. 5. July 10, 1886. ISSN 0362-4331. OCLC 1645522. http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf_r=1&res=9C02E3DE1030E533A25753C1A9619C94679FD7CF. Retrieved 2009-08-28.  
  4. ^ "The Scripture of Nature". The National Parks: America's Best Idea. KCET, 4401 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, California 90027. Sunday, September 27, 2009. No. 1, season 1.

External links


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message