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Sefer haYashar, Hebrew ספר הישר (also transliterated Sēfer haYāshār), "Book of the Upright", often only half-translated into English as Book of Jasher or as Book of Jashar.

There are a number of works with this name:

  • Sefer haYashar (Biblical references): A book mentioned in Joshua 10:13 and 2 Samuel 1:18.
  • An early Hebrew name of the Book of Genesis.
  • Rabbinical Treatises:
    • Sefer haYashar (Amoraim): A collection of sayings of the sages from the Amoraim period (1st and 2nd centuries) mentioned by Seymour J. Cohen in the introduction to Rabbi Zerahiah's Sefer Hayasher. Not known to be still in existence.
    • Sefer haYashar (Ibn Ezra): A commentary on the Pentateuch by the 12th century Rabbi Abraham Ibn Ezra.
    • Sefer haYashar (Abraham Abulafia) by the Kabbalist and philosopher Rabbi Abraham Abulafia.
    • Sefer haYashar (Rabbenu Tam): A famous 12th century treatise on Jewish ritual and ethics by Rabbeinu Tam.
    • Sefer haYashar (Rabbi Levita): The title of a moral treatise written by Rabbi Shabbatai Carmuz Levita in 1391 and preserved in a Vatican manuscript according to Edgar J. Goodspeed (in Modern Apocrypha, Famous Biblical Hoaxes [The Beacon Press, Boston, 1956])
    • Sefer haYashar (Rabbi Zerahiah ha-Yevani): A moral treatise of the 13th century published as Ha-Yewani Zerahiah, Sefer Hayashar, The Book of the Righteous, ed. and transl. by Seymour J. Cohen (New York, 1973).
    • Sefer haYashar (Rabbi Jonah ben Abraham): A 14th century work by Rabbi Jonah ben Abraham of Gerona mentioned by Seymour J. Cohen in his Sefer Hayashar. Not known to be still in existence.
  • Sefer haYashar (midrash): A book of Jewish legends covering the period from the creation of man to the first wave of the conquest of Canaan, not certain to have existed before 1625.
  • Book of Jasher (Pseudo-Jasher): An 18th century forgery alleging to be a translation of the lost book of Jasher by Alcuin.
  • Book of Jashar by Benjamin Rosenbaum. A fictional translation of the supposed Book of Jasher mentioned in 2 Samuel.
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Sefer haYashar, Hebrew ספר הישר (also transliterated Sēfer haYāshār), "Book of the Upright", often only half-translated into English as Book of Jasher or as Book of Jashar.

There are a number of works with this name:

  • Sefer haYashar (Biblical references): A book mentioned in Joshua 10:13 and 2 Samuel 1:18.
  • An early Hebrew name of the Book of Genesis.
  • Rabbinical Treatises:
    • Sefer haYashar (Amoraim): A collection of sayings of the sages from the Amoraim period (1st and 2nd centuries) mentioned by Seymour J. Cohen in the introduction to Rabbi Zerahiah's Sefer Hayasher. Not known to be still in existence.
    • Sefer haYashar (Ibn Ezra): A commentary on the Pentateuch by the 12th century Rabbi Abraham Ibn Ezra.
    • Sefer haYashar (Abraham Abulafia) by the Kabbalist and philosopher Rabbi Abraham Abulafia.
    • Sefer haYashar (Rabbenu Tam): A famous 12th century treatise on Jewish ritual and ethics by Rabbeinu Tam.
    • Sefer haYashar (Rabbi Levita): The title of a moral treatise written by Rabbi Shabbatai Carmuz Levita in 1391 and preserved in a Vatican manuscript according to Edgar J. Goodspeed (in Modern Apocrypha, Famous Biblical Hoaxes [The Beacon Press, Boston, 1956])
    • Sefer haYashar (Rabbi Zerahiah ha-Yevani): A moral treatise of the 13th century published as Ha-Yewani Zerahiah, Sefer Hayashar, The Book of the Righteous, ed. and transl. by Seymour J. Cohen (New York, 1973).
    • Sefer haYashar (Rabbi Jonah ben Abraham): A 14th century work by Rabbi Jonah ben Abraham of Gerona mentioned by Seymour J. Cohen in his Sefer Hayashar. Not known to be still in existence.
  • Sefer haYashar (midrash): A book of Jewish legends covering the period from the creation of man to the first wave of the conquest of Canaan, not certain to have existed before 1625.
  • Book of Jasher (Pseudo-Jasher): An 18th century forgery alleging to be a translation of the lost book of Jasher by Alcuin.
  • Book of Jashar by Benjamin Rosenbaum. A fictional translation of the supposed Book of Jasher mentioned in 2 Samuel.

External links

How Sefer Hayasher has Come Down to Us


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