Senegal: Wikis

  
  
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Did you know ...


More interesting facts on Senegal

Include this on your site/blog:

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Republic of Senegal
République du Sénégal
Flag Coat of arms
Motto"Un Peuple, Un But, Une Foi"  (French)
"One People, One Goal, One Faith"
AnthemPincez Tous vos Koras, Frappez les Balafons
Capital
(and largest city)
Dakar
14°40′N 17°25′W / 14.667°N 17.417°W / 14.667; -17.417
Official language(s) French
Recognised regional languages Wolof, Soninke, Seereer-Siin, Fula, Maninka, Diola,[1]
Demonym Senegalese
Government Semi-presidential republic
 -  President Abdoulaye Wade
 -  Prime Minister Souleymane Ndéné Ndiaye
Independence
 -  from France 4 April 1960 
Area
 -  Total 196,723 km2 (87th)
76,000 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) 2.1
Population
 -  2009 estimate 13,711,597[2] (67th)
 -  2002 census 9,967,215 
 -  Density 69.7/km2 (134th)
180.4/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2008 estimate
 -  Total $21.773 billion[3] 
 -  Per capita $1,739[3] 
GDP (nominal) 2008 estimate
 -  Total $13.350 billion[3] 
 -  Per capita $1,066[3] 
Gini (1995) 41.3 (medium
HDI (2007) 0.464 (low) (166th)
Currency CFA franc (XOF)
Time zone UTC
Drives on the right
Internet TLD .sn
Calling code 221

Senegal (French: le Sénégal), officially the Republic of Senegal (République du Sénégal, IPA: [ʁepyblik dy seneɡal]), is a country south of the Sénégal River in western Africa.It owes its name to the river that borders it to the East and North and that originates from the Fouta Djallon in Guinea. Senegal is externally bounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the west, Mauritania to the north, Mali to the east, and Guinea and Guinea-Bissau to the south; internally it almost completely surrounds The Gambia, namely on the north, east and south, exempting Gambia's short Atlantic Ocean coastline. Senegal covers a land area of almost 197,000 km², and has an estimated population of about 13.7 million.The climate is tropical with two seasons: the dry season and the rainy season.

Dakar the capital city of Senegal,is located to the westernmost tip of the country, about 300 miles away the Cape Verde Island, off the Atlantic Ocean. During colonial times, numerous trading Counters, belonging to various colonial empires were established along the coast. The town of St Louis became the capital of French Western Africa (Afrique Occidentale Francaise, or AOF) before it was moved to Dakar in 1902. Dakar later became its capital in 1960 at the time of independence from France.

Contents

History

Archaeological findings throughout the area indicate that Senegal was inhabited in prehistoric times.

Eastern Senegal was once part of the Empire of Ghana. It was founded by the Tukulor in the middle valley of the Senegal River. Islam, the dominant religion in Senegal, first came to the region in the 11th century. In the 13th and 14th centuries, the area came under the influence of the empires to the east; the Jolof Empire of Senegal also was founded during this time. Various European powers—Portugal, the Netherlands, and Great Britain—competed for trade in the area from the 15th century onward, until in 1677, France ended up in possession of what had become a minor slave trade departure point—the island of Gorée next to modern Dakar, used as a base to purchase slaves from the warring chiefdoms on the mainland.[4][5]

The first kingdoms were created around the 7th century, the Tekrour, the Namandirou kingdom and then the Djolof with distant ties to the Ghana empire. In the 14th century the Djolof kingdom became a powerful empire having regrouped the Cayor, the Baol, the Sine and Saloum, the Waalo, the Fouta-Toro and the Bambouk kingdoms. The empire was founded by Ndiadiane N’diaye who was able to form a coalition with many ethnicities but collapsed around 1549 with the defeat and killing of Lele Fouli Fak by Amari Ngone Sobel Fall. French colonialists progressively invaded and took over all kingdoms under their governor Louis Faidherbe. Islam was introduced in Senegal between the 8th and 9th century by Arab merchants. They peacefully converted the Toucouleurs and Sarakholles who in turn propagated it . Later on, in the 11th century, the Almoravids, with the help of the Toucouleurs used Jihad as a mean of conversion. This movement faced resistance from ethnicities of traditional religion and caused them to moved away further in the country (Sineisties''Insert non-formatted text here'') and to the South( Casamance). Eventually, Arabs won a peaceful conversion thanks to the intervention of leaders like Cheikh Ahmadou Bamba ,El Hadj Malick Sy, and Seydina Limamou Laye who were able to convince their followers. They saw Islam as a way to unite and fight against colonial power. The populations were getting weary of repeated jihads and forced colonization. Europeans missionaries introduced Christianity to the Sine and Casamance in the 19th century. An emblematic figure of Casamance is Aline Sitoe Diatta, a woman who lead the resistance movement against European colonialists.

It was only in the 1850s that the French began to expand onto the Senegalese mainland (by now rid of slavery and promoting abolitionist doctrine), adding native chiefdoms such as Waalo, Cayor, Baol, and Jolof. Senegalese chiefs' resistance to the French expansion and curtailing of their lucrative slave trade was led in part by Lat-Dior, Damel (great chief) of Cayor.

In January 1959 Senegal and the French Sudan merged to form the Mali Federation, which became fully independent on 20 June 1960, as a result of the independence and the transfer of power agreement signed with France on 4 April 1960. Due to internal political difficulties, the Federation broke up on August 20. Senegal and French Sudan (renamed the Republic of Mali) proclaimed independence. Léopold Senghor was proclaimed Senegal's first president in September 1960. Senghor was a very well read man, educated in France. He was a poet, a philosopher and personally drafted the Senegalese national anthem, "Pincez tous vos koras frappez les balafons". As such he was not really a politician but was handed the presidency by the French authorities who saw in him a brilliant and peaceful man and not a revolutionary like Ahmed Sekou Toure of the neighboring Guinea

Later after the breakup of the Mali Federation, President Senghor and Prime Minister Mamadou Dia governed together under a parliamentary system. Senghor always feared his Prime Minister who was a very charismatic figure and a hard liner. In December 1962 he accused him of an attempted coup and Dia was wrongfully convicted of treason and briefly jailed. Senegal adopted a new constitution that consolidated the president's power. In 2006, the current president Abdoulaye Wade vacated the conviction and bestowed upon him a Medal of Honor. In 1980 President Senghor decided to retire from politics, and he handed power over in 1981 to his handpicked successor, Abdou Diouf. Mamadou Dia ran for reelection in 1983 against Abdou Diouf but lost. Senghor moved to France where he later died at the age of 96 having been married to a French woman.

Senegal joined with The Gambia to form the nominal confederation of Senegambia on 1 February 1982. However, the union was dissolved in 1989. Despite peace talks, a southern separatist group in the Casamance region had clashed sporadically with government forces since 1982. Senegal has had a long history of participating in international peacekeeping.[2]

Abdou Diouf was president between 1981 and 2000. He encouraged broader political participation, reduced government involvement in the economy, and widened Senegal's diplomatic engagements, particularly with other developing nations. Domestic politics on occasion spilled over into street violence, border tensions, and a violent separatist movement in the southern region of the Casamance. Nevertheless, Senegal's commitment to democracy and human rights strengthened. Diouf served four terms as president.

In the presidential election of 1999, opposition leader Abdoulaye Wade defeated Diouf in an election deemed free and fair by international observers. Senegal experienced its second peaceful transition of power, and its first from one political party to another. On 30 December 2004 President Abdoulaye Wade announced that he would sign a peace treaty with the separatist group in the Casamance region. This, however, has yet to be implemented. There was a round of talks in 2005, but the results did not yet yield a resolution.

Politics

Abdoulaye Wade, current president of Senegal.

Senegal is a republic with a presidency; the president is elected every five years as of 2001, previously being seven years, by universal adult suffrage. The current president is Abdoulaye Wade, re-elected in March 2007.

Senegal has more than 80 political parties. The bicameral parliament consists of the National Assembly, which has 120 seats, and the Senate, which has 100 seats and was reinstituted in 2007.[2] An independent judiciary also exists in Senegal. The nation's highest courts that deal with business issues are the constitutional council and the court of justice, members of which are named by the president.

Currently Senegal has a democratic political culture, being one of the more successful post-colonial democratic transitions in Africa. Local administrators are appointed by, and responsible to, the president. The marabouts, religious leaders of the various Senegalese Muslim brotherhoods, also exercise a strong political influence in the country. In 2009, however, Freedom House downgraded Senegal's status from 'Free' to 'Partially Free', based on increased centralisation of power in the executive.

In 2008, Senegal finished in 10th position on the Ibrahim Index of African Governance. The Ibrahim Index is a comprehensive measure of sub-Saharan African governance, based on a number of different variables which reflect the success with which governments deliver essential political goods to its citizens. In 2009, Senegal's ranking slipped substantially, to 17th place[6]; however, this is partially accounted for by the addition of Northern African nations to the rankings.

Geography

Landscape of Casamance.

Senegal is located on the west of the African continent. The Senegalese landscape consists mainly of the rolling sandy plains of the western Sahel which rise to foothills in the southeast. Here is also found Senegal's highest point, an otherwise unnamed feature near Nepen Diakha at 584 m (1,916 ft). The northern border is formed by the Senegal River, other rivers include the Gambia and Casamance Rivers. The capital Dakar lies on the Cap-Vert peninsula, the westernmost point of continental Africa.

The local climate is tropical with well-defined dry and humid seasons that result from northeast winter winds and southwest summer winds. Dakar's annual rainfall of about 600 mm (23.6 in) occurs between June and October when maximum temperatures average 27 °C (80.6 °F); December to February minimum temperatures are about 17 °C (62.6 °F). Interior temperatures can be substantially higher than along the coast, and rainfall increases substantially farther south, exceeding 1,500 mm (59.1 in) annually in some areas. The far interior of the country, in the region of Tambacounda, particularly on the border of Mali, temperatures can reach as high as 54 °C (129.2 °F).

The Cape Verde islands lie some 560 kilometers (348 mi) off the Senegalese coast, but Cap Vert ("Cape Green") is a maritime placemark, set at the foot of "Les Mammelles" , a 105-metre (344 ft) cliff resting at one end of the Cap Vert peninsula onto which is settled Senegal's capital Dakar, and 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) south of the "Pointe des Almadies", the western-most point in Africa.

Administrative divisions

Regions of Senegal

Senegal is subdivided into 14 regions,[7] each administered by a Conseil Régional (Regional Council) elected by population weight at the Arrondissement level. The country is further subdivided by 45 Départements, 103 Arrondissements (neither of which have administrative function) and by Collectivités Locales, which elect administrative officers.[8]

Regional capitals have the same name as their respective regions:

Major cities

Major cities in Senegal

Senegal's capital of Dakar is by far the largest city in Senegal, with over two million residents.[9] The second most populous city is Touba, a de jure communaute rurale (rural community), with half a million.[9][10]

City Population (2005)
Dakar (Dakar proper, Guédiawaye, and Pikine[10]) 2,145,193[9]
Touba (Touba Mosquee[10]) 475,755[9]
Thiès 240,152[9]
Kaolack 181,035[9]
M'Bour 170,875[9]
Saint-Louis 165,038[9]
Rufisque 154,975[9]
Ziguinchor 153,456[9]

Economy

Grand Market in Kaolack

In January 1994 Senegal undertook a bold and ambitious economic reform program with the support of the international donor community. This reform began with a 50 percent devaluation of Senegal's currency, the CFA franc, which was linked at a fixed rate to the former French franc and now to the euro. Government price controls and subsidies have been steadily dismantled.

After seeing its economy retract by 2.1 percent in 1993, Senegal made an important turnaround, thanks to the reform program, with real growth in GDP averaging 5 percent annually during the years 1995–2001. Annual inflation was reduced to less than 1 percent, but rose again to an estimated 3.3 percent in 2001. Investment increased steadily from 13.8 percent of GDP in 1993 to 16.5 percent in 1997.[2]

Thanks to this, Senegal's economy is starting to be one of the fastest growing in the world.[citation needed]

The main industries include food processing, mining, cement, artificial fertilizer, chemicals, textiles, refining imported petroleum, and tourism. Exports include fish, chemicals, cotton, fabrics, groundnuts, and calcium phosphate, and the principal foreign market is India at 26.7 percent of exports (as of 1998). Other foreign markets include the US, Italy, and the UK.

As a member of the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU), Senegal is working toward greater regional integration with a unified external tariff. Senegal is also a member of the Organization for the Harmonization of Business Law in Africa (OHADA).[11]

Senegal realized full Internet connectivity in 1996, creating a mini-boom in information technology-based services. Private activity now accounts for 82 percent of GDP.[citation needed] On the negative side, Senegal faces deep-seated[citation needed] urban problems of chronic high unemployment, socioeconomic disparity, and juvenile delinquency[citation needed].

Senegal is a major recipient of international development assistance. Donors include USAID, Japan, France and China. Over 3000 Peace Corps Volunteers have served in Senegal since 1963.[12]

Demographics

Population in Senegal, 1962–2004
A street market in Dakar

Senegal has a population of over 12.5 million, about 42 percent of whom live in rural areas. Density in these areas varies from about 77 inhabitants per square kilometre (199/sq mi) in the west-central region to 2 inhabitants per square kilometre (5/sq mi) in the arid eastern section.

According to the World Refugee Survey 2008, published by the U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, Senegal has a population of refugees and asylum seekers numbering approximately 23,800 in 2007. The majority of this population (20,200) is from Mauritania. Refugees live in N'dioum, Dodel, and small settlements along the Senegal River valley.[13]

Ethnicity

Senegal has a wide variety of ethnic groups and, as in most West African countries, several languages are widely spoken. The Wolof are the largest single ethnic group in Senegal at 43 percent; the Peul and Toucouleur (also known as Halpulaar, Fulbe or Fula) (24 percent) are the second biggest group, followed by others that include the Serer (15 percent), Lebou (10 percent), Jola (4 percent), Mandinka (3 percent), Maures or Naarkajors, Soninke, Bassari and many smaller communities (9 percent). (See also the Bedick ethnic group.)

About 50,000 Europeans (mostly French) and Lebanese[14] as well as smaller numbers of Mauritanians and Moroccans reside in Senegal, mainly in the cities. The majority of Lebanese work in commerce.[15] Also located primarily in urban settings are small Vietnamese communities as well as a growing number of Chinese immigrant traders, each numbering perhaps a few hundred people.[16][17] There are also tens of thousands of Mauritanian refugees in Senegal, primarily in the country's north.[18]

From the time of earliest contact between Europeans and Africans along the coast of Senegal, particularly after the establishment of coastal trading posts during the fifteenth century, communities of mixed African and European (mostly French and Portuguese) origin have thrived. Cape Verdean migrants and their descendants living in urban areas and in the Casamance region represent another recognized community of mixed African and European background.[19]

French is the official language, used regularly by a minority of Senegalese educated in a system styled upon the colonial-era schools of French origin (Koranic schools are even more popular, but Arabic is not widely spoken outside of this context of recitation). Most people also speak their own ethnic language while, especially in Dakar, Wolof is the lingua franca. Pulaar is spoken by the Peuls and Toucouleur.

Portuguese Creole is a prominent minority language in Ziguinchor, regional capital of the Casamance, where some residents speak Kriol, primarily spoken in Guinea-Bissau. Cape Verdeans speak their native creole, Cape Verdean Creole, and standard Portuguese.

Health

Public expenditure on health was at 2.4 % of the GDP in 2004, whereas private expenditure was at 3.5 %.[20] Health expenditure was at US$ 72 (PPP) per capita in 2004.[20] The fertility rate was at about 5.2 in the early 2000s.[20] There were 6 physicians per 100,000 persons in the early 2000s.[20] Infant mortality was at 77 per 1,000 live births in 2005.[20]

Religion

Islam is the predominant religion, practiced by approximately 95 percent of the country's population; the Christian community, at 5 percent of the population, includes Roman Catholics and diverse Protestant denominations. There is also a 1 percent population who maintain animism in their beliefs, particularly in the southeastern region of the country.[2]

Islam

The Mosquée de la Divinité in Ouakam

Islamic communities are generally organized around one of several Islamic Sufi orders or brotherhoods, headed by a khalif (xaliifa in Wolof, from Arabic khalīfa), who is usually a direct descendant of the group’s founder. The two largest and most prominent Sufi orders in Senegal are the Tijaniyya, whose largest sub-groups are based in the cities of Tivaouane and Kaolack, and the Murīdiyya (Murid), based in the city of Touba.

The Halpulaar, a widespread ethnic group found along the Sahel from Chad to Senegal, representing 20 percent[citation needed] of the Senegalese population, were the first to convert to Islam. The Halpulaar, composed of various Fula people groups, named Peuls and Toucouleurs in Senegal.

Many of the Toucouleurs, or sedentary Halpulaar of the Senegal River Valley in the north, converted to Islam around a millennium ago and later contributed to Islam's propagation throughout Senegal. Most communities south of the Senegal River Valley, however, were not thoroughly Islamized until the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. During the mid-19th century, Islam became a banner of resistance against the traditional aristocracies and French colonialism, and Tijānī leaders Al-Hajj Umar Tall and Màbba Jaxu Ba established short-lived but influential Islamic states but were both killed in battle and their territories then annexed by the French.

The spread of formal Quranic school (called daara in Wolof) during the colonial period increased largely through the effort of the Tijaniyya. In Murid communities, which place more emphasis on the work ethic than on literary Quranic studies, the term daara often applies to work groups devoted to working for a religious leader. Other Islamic groups include the much older Qādiriyya order and the Senegalese Laayeen order, which is prominent among the coastal Lebu. Today, most Senegalese children study at daaras for several years, memorizing as much of the Qur'an as they can. Some of them continue their religious studies at informal Arabic schools (majlis) or at the growing number of private Arabic schools and publicly funded Franco-Arabic schools.

Christianity

It comprises about 5% of the population of Senegal. Small Roman Catholic communities are mainly found in coastal Serer, Jola, Mankanya and Balant populations, and in eastern Senegal among the Bassari and Coniagui.

The Protestant churches are mainly attended by immigrants but during the second half of the twentieth century Protestant churches led by Senegales leaders from different ethnic groups have evolved. In Dakar Catholic and Protestant rites are practiced by the Lebanese, Capeverdian, European, and American immigrant populations, and among certain Africans of other countries as well as by the Senegalese themselves. Although Islam is Senegal's majority religion, Senegal's first president, Léopold Sédar Senghor, was a Catholic Serer.

Other religions

Animism, once widely practiced, has declined in Senegal in recent decades, though some Muslims and Christians incorporate elements of animism in their worship. There are small numbers of adherents of Judaism and Buddhism. Judaism is followed by members of several ethnic groups, while Buddhism is followed by a number of Vietnamese.

Bahá'í Faith

The Bahá'í Faith in Senegal was established after `Abdu'l-Bahá, the son of the founder of the religion, mentioned Africa as a place the religion should be more broadly visited by Bahá'ís.[21] The first to set foot in the territory of French West Africa that would become Senegal arrived in 1953.[22] The first Bahá'í Local Spiritual Assembly of Senegal was elected in 1966 in Dakar.[23] In 1975 the Bahá'í community elected the first National Spiritual Assembly of Senegal. The most recent estimate, by the Association of Religion Data Archives in a 2005 report details the population of Senegalese Bahá'ís at 22,000.[24]

Ritual in Kaolack (1967)

Culture

Senegal's musical heritage is better known than that of most African countries, due to the popularity of mbalax, which is a form of Wolof percussive; it has been popularized by Youssou N'Dour. Sabar drumming is especially popular. The sabar is mostly used in special celebrations like weddings. Another instrument, the tama, is used in more ethnic groups. Other popular Senegalese musicians are Ismael Lô, Orchestra Baobab, Baba Maal, Thione Seck, Akon Viviane, Titi, and Pape Diouf.

Education

Articles 21 and 22 of the Constitution adopted in January 2001 guarantee access to education for all children.[25] Education is compulsory and free up to the age of 16.[25] The Ministry of Labor has indicated that the public school system is unable to cope with the number of children that must enroll each year.[25] Illiteracy is high, particularly among women.[20] The net primary enrollment rate was 69 % in 2005. Public expenditure on education was 5.4 % of the 2002-2005 GDP.

International rankings

Organization Survey Ranking
Institute for Economics and Peace [2] Global Peace Index[26] 80 out of 144
United Nations Development Programme Human Development Index 166 out of 182
Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index 99 out of 180
World Economic Forum Global Competitiveness Report 92 out of 133

See also

References

  1. ^ « La langue officielle de la République du Sénégal est le Français. Les langues nationales sont le Diola, le Malinké, le Pulaar, le Sérère, le Soninké, le Wolof et toute autre langue nationale qui sera codifiée. » − Extrait du site officiel du gouvernement sénégalais
  2. ^ a b c d e Central Intelligence Agency (2009). "Senegal". The World Factbook. https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/sg.html. Retrieved January 10, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Senegal". International Monetary Fund. http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2009/02/weodata/weorept.aspx?sy=2006&ey=2009&scsm=1&ssd=1&sort=country&ds=.&br=1&c=722&s=NGDPD%2CNGDPDPC%2CPPPGDP%2CPPPPC%2CLP&grp=0&a=&pr.x=54&pr.y=1. Retrieved 2009-10-01. 
  4. ^ "Goree and the Atlantic Slave Trade", Philip Curtin, History Net, accessed 9 Jul 2008
  5. ^ Les Guides Bleus: Afrique de l'Ouest(1958 ed.), p. 123
  6. ^ http://www.moibrahimfoundation.org/en/section/the-ibrahim-index/scores-and-ranking
  7. ^ Statoids page on Senegal (noting that three new regions were split off on September 10, 2008).
  8. ^ List of current local elected officials from Union des Associations d’ Elus Locaux (UAEL) du Sénégal. See also the law creating current local government structures: (French)Code des collectivités locales, Loi n° 96-06 du 22 mars 1996.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Agence Nationale de la Statistique et de la Démographie (2005). "Situation économique et sociale du Sénégal" (in French) (PDF). Government of Senegal. http://www.ansd.org/SES2005.pdf. Retrieved 2008-11-18. 
  10. ^ a b c Forsberg, Jan. "Cities in Senegal". http://popofcities.com/senegalCITY.htm. Retrieved 2008-11/18. 
  11. ^ OHADA.com: The business law portal in Africa, http://www.ohada.com/index.php, retrieved 2009-03-22 
  12. ^ [1]
  13. ^ "World Refugee Survey 2008". U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants. 2008-06-19. http://www.refugees.org/survey. 
  14. ^ Senegal (03/08), U.S. Department of State
  15. ^ Lebanese Immigrants Boost West African Commerce, By Naomi Schwarz, voanews.com, July 10, 2007
  16. ^ Phuong, Tran (July 9, 2007), "Vietnamese Continue Traditions in Senegal", Voice of America, http://www.voanews.com/english/2007-07-09-voa19.cfm, retrieved 2008-08-27 
  17. ^ Fitzsimmons, Caitlin (2008-01-17), "A troubled frontier: Chinese migrants in Senegal", South China Morning Post, http://www.caitlinfitzsimmons.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/01/caitlin1.pdf, retrieved 2009-03-31 
  18. ^ "Boost for the reintegration of Mauritanian returnees", UNHCR News, 2008-11-26, http://www.unhcr.org/news/NEWS/492d41584.html, retrieved 2010-01-12 
  19. ^ Arena, Joaquim (2002-11-01), Migrations et diversités au Cap-Vert, en Guinée-Bissau et Sao Tomé et Principe, PANOS Institute West Africa, http://www.panos-ao.org/ipao/spip.php?article2934, retrieved 2009-08-27 
  20. ^ a b c d e f http://hdrstats.undp.org/en/countries/data_sheets/cty_ds_SEN.html
  21. ^ `Abdu'l-Bahá (1991). Tablets of the Divine Plan (Paperback ed.). Wilmette, IL: Bahá'í Publishing Trust. pp. 47–59. ISBN 0877432333. http://reference.bahai.org/en/t/ab/TDP/tdp-8.html.iso8859-1. 
  22. ^ Hassall, Graham (c. 2000). "Egypt: Baha'i history". Asia Pacific Bahá'í Studies: Bahá'í Communities by country. Bahá'í Online Library. http://bahai-library.com/asia-pacific/country%20files/egypt.htm. Retrieved 2009-05-24. 
  23. ^ Bahá'í International Community (2003-12-28), "National communities celebrate together", Bahá'í International News Service, http://hfa01.news.bahai.org/story/283 
  24. ^ "Most Baha'i Nations (2005)". QuickLists > Compare Nations > Religions >. The Association of Religion Data Archives. 2005. http://www.thearda.com/QuickLists/QuickList_40c.asp. Retrieved 2009-07-04. 
  25. ^ a b c "Senegal". 2005 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor. Bureau of International Labor Affairs, U.S. Department of Labor (2006). This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  26. ^ "Vision of Humanity". Vision of Humanity. http://www.visionofhumanity.org/gpi/home.php. Retrieved 2010-02-04. 

External links

Government
General information
News
Tourism
Other



Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Africa : West Africa : Senegal
noframeNiokolokoba
Location
noframe
Flag
Image:sg-flag.png
Quick Facts
Capital Dakar
Government Republic under multiparty democratic rule
Currency Communaute Financiere Africaine franc (XOF)
Area total: 196,190 km2
land: 192,000 km2
water: 4,190 km2
Population 10,589,571 (July 2002 est.)
Language French (official), Wolof, Pulaar, Jola, Mandinka
Religion Muslim 94%, indigenous beliefs 1%, Christian 5% (mostly Roman Catholic)
Electricity 230V/50Hz (European plug)
Calling Code +221
Internet TLD .sn
Time Zone UTC

Senegal [1] is a country in Western Africa. With the Atlantic Ocean to the west, Senegal has Guinea-Bissau to the south, Guinea to the southeast, Mali to the east, and Mauritania to the north. The Gambia is almost an enclave of Senegal in the middle of the western coast.

Regions

There are 14 regions:

Map of Senegal
Map of Senegal
Ports and harbors 
Matam, Podor, Richard Toll, Dakar
Places of religion and contemplation
Keur Moussa, Touba, Tivaouane
Interesting Islands
Fadiout + Joal, Ile de Gorée, Karabane
Nature reserves
Niokolo-Koba, Delta du Saloum, Parc National des oiseaux du Djoudj, Reserve de Palmarin
Stone circles
Nioro du Rip, Keur Ali Lobé, Sali, Kau-Ur to Wassau, Ker Batch

Climate

Tropical; hot, humid; rainy season (May to November) has strong southeast winds; dry season (December to April) dominated by hot, dry, harmattan wind; Natural hazards : lowlands seasonally flooded; periodic droughts.

Terrain

Generally low, rolling, plains rising to foothills in southeast

Highest point 
unnamed feature near Nepen Diakha 581 m
Independence 
4 April 1960 (from France); complete independence was achieved upon dissolution of federation with Mali on 20 August 1960
National holiday 
Independence Day, 4 April (1960)

Independent from France in 1960, Senegal joined with The Gambia to form the nominal confederation of Senegambia in 1982. However, the envisaged integration of the two countries was never carried out, and the union was dissolved in 1989. Despite peace talks, a southern separatist group sporadically has clashed with government forces since 1982. Senegal has a long history of participating in international peacekeeping.

Constitution 
a new constitution was adopted 7 January 2001
Air Senegal 737
Air Senegal 737

Passport and Visas

No visa is required for citizens of Canada, ECOWAS, European Union (except 12 new member countries), Israel, Japan, Mauritania, Morocco, Taiwan and US for up to 90 days.

By plane

Delta Air Lines flies to Dakar on most of their US-Africa services, service from Atlanta takes roughly 8 hours. South African Airways flies direct from New York and Washington-Dulles in just about 7 hours (8.5 on the return trip). Other airlines route through Europe such as SN Brussels Airlines (Brussels), Air Senegal International (Paris-Orly), Air France (Paris-CDG), Alitalia (Milan), Royal Air Maroc (Casablanca), Iberia (Madrid), TAP (Lisbon) and others (5.5 to 6 hours). There are flights from various parts of Africa operated by Virgin Nigeria (Lagos), Kenya Airways (Nairobi), Air Ivoire (Abidjan) and others.

By car

It is possible but a little bit difficult to get into Senegal by car. Senegal prohibits the import of cars that are more than five years old, but if you are only staying for a short while, and agree to take your car out of the country, you should (eventually) be allowed through, but this cannot be guaranteed.

By train

A railway connects Dakar and Koulikoro in Mali. It stops at many cities in Senegal, including Thiès. Stops in Mali include Kayes and Bamako [2].

Get around

Taxi, taxi-brousse, taxi-clando, car-charette, transport commun (cars rapides) Buslines in Dakar and around Dakar are maintained by SOTRAC (Société des Transports en commun de Cap Vert), now managed by a private company and called Dakar Demm Dikk. Car hire is available in Dakar (city and airport) and sometimes in MBour and Saly Portudal. A list of the car hire companies can be found here: [3].

The main method of travel around the country is by sept places (from French, "seven seats," literally questionable station wagons in which they will pack seven people so that you are basically sitting on the next person's lap throughout the journey). You can also come with a group and rent out an entire sept place, but this will be expensive. If you are obviously a tourist, they will try to rip you off, so make sure to set a price before you agree to a driver. There are set prices to often-travelled locations.

See also: Wolof phrasebook

Wolof is the native language of some Senegalese people, but you will find that almost everyone speaks it. Knowing the basic Wolof greetings and phrases will go a long way in getting you better service and prices.

The Senegalese people learn French in school and it is a very useful language for travellers to know. While some Senegalese merchants speak English, most business is conducted in French or Wolof. Other languages used in Senegal include Sereer, Soninke, Pulaar, Jola, and Mandinka are spoken.

The basic Muslim greeting is often used: Salaam Aleikum - Peace to you. The response is Waleikum Salaam - And unto you peace.

  • Fathala Reserve, (at Karang just north of the border to Gambia), ''221'' 776379455 (), [4]. open all year. Go an a 3-hour mini-safari in your own car or hire an off-road car at the reserve. You will see giraffes, rhinos, elands, antilopes, many birds 10000.  edit

Buy

Maps

Tourist maps are available at the tourist offices (see au-senegal.com for that one)

International Driving Permit (IDP)

If you want to explore the country by (rented) car, you need one.

Vaccines

No vaccines are required to enter the country, however a yellow fever vaccine is highly recommended.

Mosquito repellents

Buy at least a mosquito net (preferably permethrin-impregnated) and a good repellent (preferably DEET-based). Also, many outdoor retailers in the US sell bottles of Permethrin that can be washed into clothing and will remain in the garment for a month before the effectiveness of the product wears off and should be reapplied.

Eat

Be careful with food prepared by the road, as it could be cooked in unsanitary conditions. Western-style meals are available and can be found at restaurants in various parts of Dakar, Thies, Saint Louis and other towns and near the big hotels in the Petite Côte and in some other touristic regions of the country too. If you really want to try the genuine Senegalese food you can buy it at restaurants serving Senegalese dishes or alternatively, you can make it yourself with the food gathered fresh from the markets or supermarkets.

The official dish of Senegal is ceebu jen (or thebou diene) -- rice and fish. It comes in two varieties (red and white -- named for the different sauces). The Senegalese love ceebu jen and will often ask if you've ever tried it, and it is definitely part of the experience. Even better if you get the chance to eat with your hands around the bowl with a Senegalese family! Keep your eyes out for the delicious, but elusive ceebu jen "diagga" which is served with extra sauce and fish balls. Other common dishes are Maafe, which is a rich, oily peanut-based sauce with meat that is served over white rice. "Yassa" is a delicious onion sauce that is often served over rice and chicken, "Yassa poulet" or with deep fried fish "Yassa Jen."

Drink

If you intend to explore the arid area of Senegal (Saint-Louis & Ferlo), you need to drink several liters of water a day. Even in Dakar, dehydration is possible during warmer months if you do not drink enough water each day.

Baobab tree
Baobab tree

It might also be a good idea to learn some basic Wolof, since not everybody can speak French. In addition there are many other languages such as Toucouleur, Serere, peuls, etc.... However almost everyone can speak wolof. Therefore knowing wolof would be a big help.

Stay safe

Although highly exaggerated, there is still fighting going on in the Casamance region of Senegal.
The "struggle" goes on between the government and the MFDC or mouvement des forces démocratiques de la Casamance. It would be wise to avoid travel to this area, if this is not possible or if you really want to see this region, then at least first check with the embassy for the latest situation. To find out how much the situation has improved look at this IRIN News report: [5]

In Dakar, take care when walking the streets - petty theft and scams are abundant. You will be approached by aggressive street vendors who will follow you for several blocks. If refused, often accusations of 'racism" will be leveled at non-local, non-buyers. Also, pickpockets use the following two-person tactic - one (the distraction) will grab one of your pant's leg while the other (the thief) goes into your pocket. If someone grabs your clothing beware of the other one on your other side most. Wear pants/shorts with secure (buttons or snaps) pockets and leave your shirt untucked to cover your pockets.

Be cautious of people claiming to have met you before or offering to guide you. Often times you will be led to a remote location and robbed. Women need to be particularly alert as they are frequently targeted at beaches or markets.

Finally, there have been instances of street stall vendors grabbing cash out of non-local shoppers hands and quickly stuffing the money into their own pocket. After the money is in their pocket, they claim it is their's and the victim is not in a position to prove otherwise or protest effectively. Be careful with your cash - do not hold it in your hand while bargaining.

Stay healthy

Get necessary vaccines before arrival. Officially, certification of yellow fever vaccine is required upon arrival if coming from a country in a yellow fever zone, but it is not commonly checked.

Take anti-malarials.

Avoid tap-water, and all dishes prepared with them. Bottled water, such as Kirene which is most common and bottled in Senegal, is widely available and inexpensive.

To prevent serious effects of dehydration, it is wise to carry around packets of rehydration salts to mix with water, should you become dehydrated. These are widely available at pharmacies and are inexpensive. Alternatively, a proper mix of table salt and sugar can replace these.

Respect

The primary religion in Senegal is Islam, and most Senegalese are extremely devout Muslims. It's important to be respectful of this because religion is very important in Senegalese life. However, don't be afraid to ask questions about Islam -- for the most part, Senegalese people love to talk about it!

Greet everyone when entering a room with "Salaam Aleikum." Always shake hands with everyone. Do not enter mosques and other religious places with your shoes.

Foreign women can expect to get many marriage proposals from Senegalese men. Handle this with a sense of humor - and caution.

This article is an outline and needs more content. It has a template, but there is not enough information present. Please plunge forward and help it grow!

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

There is more than one meaning of Senegal discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia. We are planning to let all links go to the correct meaning directly, but for now you will have to search it out from the list below by yourself. If you want to change the link that led you here yourself, it would be appreciated.


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

Proper noun

Singular
Senegal

Plural
-

Senegal

  1. Country in Western Africa. Official name: Republic of Senegal.

Translations

See also


Bosnian

Proper noun

Senegal m

  1. Senegal, the country
  2. Senegal, the river

Croatian

Proper noun

Senegal m.

  1. Senegal (country)
  2. Senegal (river)

Czech

Proper noun

Senegal m.

  1. Senegal

Finnish

Wikipedia-logo.png
Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:
Senegal

Wikipedia fi

Proper noun

Senegal

  1. Senegal

Declension


German

Wikipedia-logo.png
German Wikipedia has an article on:
Senegal

Wikipedia de

Proper noun

Senegal m.

  1. Senegal, the country
  2. Senegal, the river

Italian

Wikipedia-logo.png
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Senegal

Wikipedia it

Proper noun

Senegal m.

  1. Senegal, the country
  2. Senegal, the river

Related terms

Anagrams


Norwegian

Proper noun

Senegal

  1. Senegal, the country
  2. Senegal, the river

Related terms


Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /sɛˈnɛɡal/

Proper noun

Senegal m.

  1. Senegal (country)
  2. Senegal (river)

Declension

Singular only
Nominative Senegal
Genitive Senegalu
Dative Senegalowi
Accusative Senegal
Instrumental Senegalem
Locative Senegalu
Vocative Senegalu

Derived terms

  • (#1) Senegalczyk m., Senegalka f.
  • (#1) adjective: senegalski

Serbian

Proper noun

Senegal m

  1. Senegal, the country
  2. Senegal, the river

See also


Spanish

Proper noun

Senegal m.

  1. Senegal

Tatar

Proper noun

Senegal

  1. Senegal

Declension


Simple English

[[File:|right|]]
File:Senegal
Map of Senegal

The Republic of Senegal (French République du Sénégal) is a nation in West Africa. The capital is Dakar.

Geography

In the north of Senegal is the Senegal River. To the north of the river is Mauritania. The nation borders Mali in the east, Guinea-Bissau in the south, and Guinea in the south-east. The Gambia is another country inside of Senegal, along the Gambia River. It is about 300 km long.

The north of Senegal is part of the Sahel. The highest mountain is 581 m high. The rainy season is between June and October. The average temperature on the coast is about 24° C, and inland about 27° C.

Regions:

  • Dakar
  • Diourbel
  • Fatick
  • Kaolack
  • Kolda
  • Louga
  • Matam
  • Saint-Louis
  • Tambacounda
  • Thiès
  • Ziguinchor

History

In the 15th century, Portuguese people came to Gorée Island off the coast of Dakar. In the 17th century, French people and Dutch people came there, too. These European countries used the island as a trading post in slaves from the mainland, controlled by the Muslim Wolof Empires. Slavery was later made illegal by France, but soon after, around 1850, the French started to conquer the Wolof. By 1902 Senegal was a part of the French colony French West Africa.

In January 1959, Senegal and the French Sudan became one to form the Mali Federation, which became fully independent on June 20, 1960, as a result of the independence and transfer of power agreement signed with France on April 4, 1960. This did not last long and Senegal and Mali broke apart into separate nations. Between 1982 and 1989 Senegal and The Gambia joined together to make Senegambia.

Error creating thumbnail: sh: convert: command not found


bjn:Senegal








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message