Sheila: Wikis

  
  
  

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Sheila is a common given name for a female, taken from the Gaelic name Síle/Sìle, which is believed to be a Gaelic form of Julia or Cecilia. Like "Cecil" or "Cecilia", the name means "blind", from the Latin caecus.

Sheila is also a colloquial term for a girl or woman in Australia and some other Commonwealth countries, thought to be derived from the term 'she-lag,' lag being English slang for convict.

Sheila may also refer to:

People:

  • Sheila Wilmot (born 1963), Taking responsibility, Taking Direction: White anti-racism in Canada

In fiction:

In music:

Other:


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also sheila

Contents

English

Alternative spellings

Etymology

Anglicized spelling of Síle, the Irish form of Cecilia.

Proper noun

Singular
Sheila

Plural
-

Sheila

  1. A female given name.

Usage notes

Originally used in Ireland; popular in the UK from the 1920s to the 1950s.

Quotations

  • 1874 William Black, A Princess of Thule, Adamant Media Corporation, ISBN 1402170394, page 295
    Were English girls not good enough for him that he must needs come up and take away Sheila Mackenzie, and keep her there in the South.
  • 1933 Eleanor Farjeon, Over the Garden Wall,Faber and Faber 1933, page 91 ("Girls' Names")
    What lovely names for girls there are! / There's Stella like the Evening Star, / And Sylvia like a rustling tree, / And Lola like a melody, / And Flora like a flowery morn, / And Sheila like a field of corn,
  • 2008 Helen Walsh, Once Upon a Time in England, ISBN 9781841958682, page 48-49
    He shortened her name to Sheila which, in spite of its primness, she seemed to love. - - - For Susheela - Sheila, as she was now known - this creeping daylight signalled the start, not the end of sleep.

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