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Shekel sign: Wikis

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The two ways of representing shekels. On the left, is with the "₪" symbol, and on the right is with abbreviation "ש״ח". They mean the same thing. The symbols need not necessarily be smaller than the numbers; this was done for stylistic reasons.

Punctuation

apostrophe ( ' )
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General typography
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Uncommon typography
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because sign ( )
interrobang ( )
irony mark/percontation point ( ؟ )
lozenge ( )
reference mark ( )
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The shekel sign () is a currency sign used for the shekel which is the currency of Israel.

Contents

Israeli shekel (1986–present)

The Israeli shekel is denoted in Hebrew "שקל חדש" (sheqel ḥadash, IPA: [ˈʃɛkɛl χaˈdaʃ], lit. "New Shekel") or by the acronym״ח" ([ʃaχ]). The symbol is constructed by combining the two Hebrew letters that constitute the acronym (the first letter of each of the two words): ("ש" and "ח"). Sometimes the "₪" symbol is used following the number, other times the acronym "ש״ח".

The Israeli toll road symbol

The shekel sign, like the dollar sign ("$"), is usually placed left to the number (i.e. "₪12,000" and not "12,000₪"), but since Hebrew is written from right to left, the symbol is actually written after the number. It is either not separated from the preceding number, or is separated only by a thin space.

Unlike the dollar sign, the new shekel sign is not used that often when handwriting monetary amounts.

The road sign announcing the entrance to the Israeli toll road, Highway 6, is a shekel symbol with a road in the background.

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Unicode and Input

The symbol "₪" is officially called the New Sheqel Sign and has the Unicode code point U+20AA. It has been found in Unicode since June 1993, version 1.1.0. In HTML it can be entered as ₪ or ₪. According to the standard Hebrew keyboard (SI 1452) it must be typed as AltGr-A (the letter ש appears on the same key in regular Hebrew mode). It can be typed into Microsoft Windows on a standard Hebrew keyboard layout by pressing AltGr and 4 (Shift-4 produces the Dollar sign). The Shekel sign, however, is not drawn on most keyboards sold in Israel and the sign is rarely used in day-to-day typing. On a non-Hebrew layout the sign can be entered by Holding Alt while pressing 8-3-6-2.

Old Israeli shekel (1980–1985)

Old Sheqel sign.svg

The old Israeli shekel, "Old Sheqel sign.svg", lasting only from 1980–1985, had a different symbol. It was a stylized Shin shaped like a cradle (i.e. rounded and opening upward). Before the introduction of the old shekel in 1980, there was no special symbol for the Israeli currency. This symbol appeared on checks issued by Israeli banks between 1980 and 1985. Quoting prices in new shekels started officially on January 1, 1986, and the old shekel checks remaining unused had to be stamped with The New Shekel symbol over the old symbol.

See also


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