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Developed shoreline of San Pedro, Belize.
Shore of Dürnstein

A shore or shoreline is the fringe of land at the edge of a large body of water, such as an ocean, sea, or lake. In Physical Oceanography a shore is the wider fringe that is geologically modified by the action of the body of water past and present, while the beach is at the edge of the shore, representing the intertidal zone where there is one.[1] In contrast to a coast, a shore can border any body of water, while the coast must border an ocean; that is, a coast is a type of shore. Shore is often substituted for coast where an oceanic shore is meant.

Shores are influenced by the topography of the surrounding landscape, as well as by water induced erosion, such as waves. The geological composition of rock and soil dictates the type of shore which is created.

See also

References

  1. ^ Pickard, George L.; William J. Emery (1990). Descriptive Physical Oceanography (5, illustrated ed.). Elsevier. pp. 7–8. ISBN 075062759X, 0750627597.  

External links


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

SHORE, a word meaning (I) the margin or edge of land when bordering on a large piece of water, whether of an ocean or sea or lake, "bank" taking its place when applied to the borders on either side of a river; for the legal aspect of the "shore," i.e., the space bordering on tidal waters between high and low water mark, see Foreshore; (2) a prop of timber, used as a support, temporary or permanent, for a building when threatening to fall or during reconstruction (see Shoring), and more particularly a timber support placed against a ship's side when building on the stocks, or when ready for launching on the slips; the props which are the final supports knocked away at the moment of launching are called the "dog-shores," one of the very numerous uses of "dog" for mechanical devices of many kinds (see Shipbuilding). Both words are to be derived ultimately from the same source, viz., the root seen in "shear," to cut off; in sense (I) the word means a part cut or "shorn" off, an edge, and appears in M.Eng. as schore, from O. Eng. sceran, to cut, shear; in sense (2) it is of Scandinavian origin and is an adaptation of the Nor. skora, a piece of timber cut off to serve as a prop or support.


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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also shore

English

Proper noun

Shore

  1. A topographic surname.

Simple English

]] A shore or shoreline is the fringe of land at the edge of a large body of water, such as an ocean, sea, or lake.

Shores are influenced by the topography of the surrounding landscape, as well as by erosion caused by water, such as waves. The geological makeup of rock and soil controls the type of shore which is created. Although a beach is a synonym for a shore, the term typically refers to shores which are sandy or pebbly, which can be produced by erosion of sedimentary soils.

A strict definition is the strip of land along a water body that is alternately exposed and covered by waves and tides.

A shore will often have a lighthouse on it to help ships in the sea.








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