The Full Wiki

Sic: Wikis

  
  
  

Did you know ...


More interesting facts on Sic

Include this on your site/blog:

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

.Sic is a Latin word meaning "thus", "so", "as such", or "in such a manner". In writing, it is placed within the quoted material, in square brackets – or outside it, in regular parentheses – and usually italicized – [sic] – to indicate that an incorrect or unusual spelling, phrase, punctuation, and/or other preceding quoted material has been reproduced verbatim from the quoted original and is not a transcription error.^ "Sic" is the Latin word for "thus," and is used by writers quoting someone to alert the reader to the fact that an error or other weirdness in the quoted material is in the original, and not an error of transcription.
  • Previous Columns/Posted 11/28/97 24 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.word-detective.com [Source type: Original source]

^ We use [sic] to indicate that the error is in the original source, not in the client’s ability to quote the source accurately.

^ The Latin word for ``thus,'' used by writers to indicate that a solecism occurring in quoted material was in the original.
  • SBF Glossary: .si to Six Sigma 24 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[1]
.It had a long vowel in Latin (sīc), meaning that it was pronounced like the English word "seek" (IPA /'sik/); however, it is normally anglicised to /'sɪk/ (like the English word "sick").^ (Latin) literally “under penalty”; in English, this phrase has become a single word – subpoena – and is a document that requires the recipient to appear in court.
  • CTCWeb Glossary: S sacerdos to synoris) 24 January 2010 2:02 UTC ablemedia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Usage

The word sic may be used to show that an uncommon or archaic usage is reported faithfully: for instance, quoting the U.S. Constitution:
The House of Representatives shall chuse [sic] their Speaker ...
It may also be used to highlight a perceived error, sometimes for the purpose of ridicule, as in this example from The Times:
Warehouse has been around for 30 years and has 263 stores, suggesting a large fan base. The chain sums up its appeal thus: "styley [sic], confident, sexy, glamorous, edgy, clean and individual, with it's [sic] finger on the fashion pulse."[2]
.On occasion, sic has been misidentified as an abbreviation for "said in context", "spelled in context", "said in copy", "spelling is correct", "spelled incorrectly" and other phrases.^ Phil, Gainesville Florida After reading many fonts on sic it prompts me to say that it means `something in careles(sic) jaikrish, Toronto Canada Said In Context...Meaning you took the words verbatim- miss-spelled and everything!
  • What does (sic) mean? | Notes and Queries | guardian.co.uk 24 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: News]

^ Eric on October 20, 2008 6:01 pm I always thought it was an abbreviation for “Spelling Is Correct.” .

^ Christine, Orlando USA 'Backronyms' (created to fit the word, but not creating the word) such as "spelling is correct", "same in copy", "spelling intentionally conserved", "said in context", or "sans intention comique" (French: without comic intent) etc.
  • What does (sic) mean? | Notes and Queries | guardian.co.uk 24 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: News]

These are all backronyms from sic.

See also

References

  1. ^ Wilson, Kenneth G. (1993). "sic (adv.)". The Columbia Guide to Standard American English. Columbia University Press. http://cup.columbia.edu/bookpreview/978-0-231-06989-2/. Retrieved 2009-11-03.   The particular entry is available in the online preview, via search.
  2. ^ Ashworth, Anne (2006-06-21). "Chain reaction: Warehouse". The Times. http://women.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,26930-2234374,00.html. Retrieved 2007-01-06.  

Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010
(Redirected to sic article)

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

Wikipedia-logo.png
Wikipedia has an article on:

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Latin sīc (thus, so).

Adverb

sic (not comparable)
Positive
sic
  1. thus; thus written
Usage notes
  • The term sic is most often used in quoted material (usually in square brackets, and sometimes italicized) to indicate that the preceding segment of the quote was copied faithfully, in spite of a mistake or seeming mistake; that is, that the mistake or seeming mistake was in the original text, and not due to misquoting on the part of the present writer.
  • It is also sometimes used outside of quoted material to emphasize that the preceding segment of text was intentionally written as is; that is, that a seeming mistake in the text is not, in fact, a mistake (or if it is, that it's an intentional mistake).
Related terms
  • sic passim (Used to indicate that the preceding word, phrase, or term is used in the same manner (or form) throughout the remainder of a text.)
  • sic transit gloria mundi
Translations

Etymology 2

Variant of seek.

Alternative spellings

Verb

Infinitive
to sic
Third person singular
sics
Simple past
sicced
Past participle
sicced
Present participle
siccing
to sic (third-person singular simple present sics, present participle siccing, simple past and past participle sicced)
  1. (transitive) To incite an attack by, especially a dog or dogs.
    He sicced his dog on me!
  2. (transitive) To set upon; to chase; to attack.
    Sic 'em, Mitzi.
Usage notes
  • The sense of "set upon" is most commonly used as an imperative, in a command to an animal.
Translations

Anagrams


Latin

Adverb

sīc
  1. thus, so, or just like that

Derived terms

Descendants


Scots

Alternative spellings

Adjective

sic (comparative mair sic, superlative maist sic)
Positive
sic
Comparative
mair sic
Superlative
maist sic
  1. such

Pronoun

sic
  1. such

Simple English

Sic is a Latin word meaning "thus", "so", "as such", or "in such a manner". In writing, it is put in square brackets and italic type – [sic] – to show that an incorrect or unusual spelling, phrase, punctuation, or other quoted material has been copied verbatim (word for word) from the quoted original and is not a error.[1]

At first, it was said like the English word "seek" (IPA /'sik/); however, it is normally said like the English word "sick" (/'sɪk/).

Usage

The word sic may be used to show that an uncommon or old usage is written faithfully: for instance, quoting the U.S. Constitution:

"The House of Representatives shall chuse [sic] their Speaker..."

It is often used, though, to highlight an error, sometimes to ridicule, such as here in The Times:

Warehouse has been around for 30 years and has 263 stores, suggesting a large fan base. The chain sums up its appeal thus: "styley [sic], confident, sexy, glamorous, edgy, clean and individual, with it's [sic] finger on the fashion pulse."[2]

Sometimes, sic is said to be an abbreviation for "said in context", "spelled in context", "said in copy", and other phrases. While incorrect, this still gives the same meaning when used.

References

  1. Wilson, Kenneth G. (1993). "sic (adv.)". The Columbia Guide to Standard American English.. Columbia University Press. http://www.bartleby.com/68/67/5467.html. Retrieved 2007-06-15. 
  2. Ashworth, Anne (2006-06-21). "Chain reaction: Warehouse". The Times. http://women.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,26930-2234374,00.html. Retrieved 2007-01-06. 


Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 17, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Sic, which are similar to those in the above article.








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message