The Full Wiki

Sidney Moncrief: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sidney Moncrief
Position(s) Shooting guard
Jersey #(s) 4, 15
Born September 21, 1957 (1957-09-21) (age 52)
Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
Career information
Year(s) 1979–1991
NBA Draft 1979 / Round: 1 / Pick: 5
College Arkansas
Professional team(s)
Career stats (NBA and/or ABA)
Points     11,931
Rebounds     3,575
Assists     2,793
Stats @ Basketball-Reference.com
Career highlights and awards

Sidney A. Moncrief (born September 21, 1957 in Little Rock, Arkansas) is a retired American professional basketball player. As an NCAA college basketball player from 1975-1979, Moncrief led the University of Arkansas Razorbacks trio known as "The Triplets" to the 1978 Final Four, which ended in a win in the NCAA Consolation Game versus #6 Notre Dame. Nicknamed Sid the Squid, Sir Sid, and El Sid, Moncrief went on to play 11 seasons in the NBA.

Contents

College career

Moncrief, Marvin Delph of Conway, Arkansas, and Ron Brewer of Fort Smith, Arkansas ("The Triplets"), along with head coach Eddie Sutton and assistant coach Gene Keady, resurrected the University of Arkansas basketball program in the 1970s from decades of modest success and disinterest, and helped lay the foundation for what became one of the country's premier college basketball programs through the mid-1990s. Moncrief's leadership on the court and electrifying play renewed interest in the Razorback program, and ushered in the winning tradition in the Arkansas basketball program. His jersey was retired not long after he graduated from school and went on to the NBA, and is still the only one. Moncrief was the school's all-time leading scorer until Todd Day broke his record in 1992.

Sidney played high school basketball for Little Rock's Hall High Warriors.

NBA career

Moncrief's NBA career started with the Milwaukee Bucks in 1979 when he was drafted 5th overall. Moncrief spent the next 10 seasons with the Bucks. In Game 3 of the first round of the 1982 NBA Playoffs, Moncrief made a running bank shot at the buzzer to beat the Philadelphia 76ers. After sitting out of the NBA for one year, Moncrief played one season with the Atlanta Hawks before retiring. The Bucks retired his no. 4 jersey in 1990, and rededicated it at halftime on January 19, 2008, when the Warriors, with whom he is a shooting coach, visited the Bradley Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin to play the Bucks.[1]

During the 1980s, Moncrief was the leader of the Milwaukee Bucks, who had the third best winning percentage for the decade behind only the Los Angeles Lakers and Boston Celtics. Moncrief was known for his versatility on the court, particularly given his 6'4" stature, but was most known for his tenacious defensive play. Moncrief was named the NBA Defensive Player of the Year for the 1982-83 and 1983-84 seasons. He also made the All-Star team for five consecutive years and was named to the All-NBA first team for the 1982-83 season. Moncrief averaged over 20 points a game 4 seasons in his career and finished his 11 year NBA career with an average of 15.6 points per game. For his accomplishments with the Bucks, his #4 jersey was retired.

Among Moncrief's admirers was All-Star Michael Jordan who once described his on-court intensity to an L.A. Times reporter: "When you play against Moncrief, you're in for a night of all-around basketball. He'll hound you everywhere you go, both ends of the court. You just expect it."[2]

Post-playing career

In 2006, Moncrief returned to basketball as the head coach of the Fort Worth Flyers, a professional basketball team in the NBA D-League. He rejoined the NBA in October 2007 when he became the shooting coach for the Golden State Warriors.[3][4]

Personal life

Moncrief's son Brett is a wide receiver for Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College.[5][6]

See also

References

External links

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message