The Full Wiki

Advertisements

More info on Siege of Bryan Station

Siege of Bryan Station: Wikis

Advertisements

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

Advertisements
(Redirected to Bryan Station article)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Siege of Bryan Station
Part of the American Revolutionary War
Bryant's station.jpg
Illustration of the women of Bryan Station getting water while Native Americans watch, just before besieging the settlement. A famous story of the American Revolution in Kentucky, the women's bravery may be folklore.
Date August 15–17, 1782
Location Lexington, Kentucky
Result American Indian siege unsuccessful
Belligerents
Kentucky settlers American Indians and allies
Commanders
William Caldwell,
Alexander McKee,
Casualties and losses
5 killed
2 wounded

Bryan Station (also Bryan's Station, and often misspelled Bryant's Station) was an early fortified settlement in Lexington, Kentucky. It was located on present-day Bryan Station Road, about three miles (5 km) north of New Circle Road, on the southern bank of Elkhorn Creek near Briar Hill Road.

The settlement was established circa 1775-76 by brothers Morgan, James, William and Joseph Bryan from North Carolina. The occupants of this parallelogram of some forty log cabins withstood several American Indian attacks. The most important occurred in August 1782 during the American Revolutionary War, when they were besieged by about 300 Shawnee Indians and British Canadians under Captain William Caldwell and Simon Girty. The attackers lifted the siege after Indian scouts reported that a force of Kentucky militia was on the way. The militiamen pursued Caldwell's force but were defeated three days later at the Battle of Blue Licks, about 60 miles (100 km) northeast.

The Lexington chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution erected a monument in August 1896 to commemorate the importance of a nearby spring in helping preserve the fort from the attack by Indians and Canadians. The pioneer women, led by Mary "Polly" Hawkins Craig (wife of "Traveling Church" patriarch Toliver Craig, Sr.), fetched water from the spring to defend against the use of burning arrows by the attackers. If the fort had burned, the attackers could have reached the women and children sheltering there.

Located a couple of miles south of the fort's site, Bryan Station High School was named in its honor. The athletic teams compete under the name "Defenders".

References


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message