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SimFarm: SimCity's Country Cousin
SimFarm Coverart.png
Cover art
Developer(s) Maxis Software
Publisher(s) Maxis Software, Mindscape, Inc.
Designer(s) Eric Albers and Mike Perry
Platform(s) DOS, Windows, Macintosh
Release date(s) 1993 (DOS)
1994 (Macintosh)
1996 (Windows 3.x)
Genre(s) Construction and management simulation
Mode(s) Single-player
Rating(s) ELSPA: 3+
ESRB: Kids to Adults

SimFarm: SimCity's Country Cousin, developed by Maxis in 1993, is a computer game in which players build and manage a virtual farm. It has a similar format to the SimCity series.

Contents

Objective

Mirroring duties on a real farm, SimFarm puts players in charge of building up the land, placing the buildings, buying and selling livestock and planting crops. A weather and season system are in place as well presenting the same kind of challenges found in a real world farm. As with SimCity, there are disasters that can wreak havoc on the player's farm. Tornadoes, droughts, pests, and dust storms are some of the events that can disrupt farm crops and harvests.

SimFarm also has a small town included in its simulation. This town is reminiscent of SimCity in its form and function. The player may interact with the town occasionally by suggesting new tile types and joining competitions with livestock (such as sending in a prize pig to potentially earn a blue ribbon and a cash prize.) Suggesting an airport to be built in the town will usually cause its construction, thus unlocking the ability to buy and use a crop duster.

The homestead in SimFarm is where the player lives and is expanded at the beginning of each game year if the player has made enough money in the previous year.

SimFarm allows the player to choose a location derived from the region and climate of one of nine areas of the US or to design one's own climate by selecting average winds, rainfall, and temperatures.

The game package also included a teachers guide to teaching with Sim Farm with black line masters for photo copying for the class and a users manual. These were printed and included in the box.

Equipment and Structures

Equipment is necessary to maintain your farm and bring your crops to harvest. Structures store equipment, livestock, seeds, and etc.

Item Cost
Tractor $400
Plow $200
Sprayer $200
Harvester $400
Trailer $200
Large Truck $500
Crop Duster* $6,000
Item Cost Stores
Small Silo $800 1 harvest
Large Silo $2,400 4 harvests
Small Shed $1,200 6 items
Large Shed $1,440 9 items
Small Barn $2,250 9 items
Large Barn $2,520 12 items

* Note the Crop Duster requires the town to have an airport

The minimum equipment required to bring one field to harvest is one tractor, one planter, one plow, one harvester, one truck, and one trailer.

Crops

The crops are the main revenue raising item in SimFarm. All crops have specific maturity cycles, water requirements, temperature requirements, and resistance to pests, weeds, and diseases. The crops include:

Crop Growing Weeks Pest Resistance Weed Resistance Disease Resistance Temp. Requirements Water Requirements
Almonds 30 Low High Low 300-500 chill hrs. 4-7 days
Apples 17 Low High Low 900-1500 chill hrs. 4-7 days
Barley 34 High Low High Avoid Freezing 1-3 days
Carrots 17 Low Low Low 1800 Degree Days 3-4 days
Corn 12 Low High High 2000 Degree Days 8-9 days
Cotton 12 Low Low High 850-900 Degree Days 8-12 days
Gladiolus 12 Low Low Low Avoid Freezing 8-12 Days
Grapes 22 Low Low Low 3000 degree days 3-5 days
Lettuce 13 Low Low Low 1600 Degree Days 4-6 days
Oats 34 Low Low Low Avoid Freezing 2-3 Days
Onions 22 High Low Low 2700 Degree Days 3-4 Days
Orange Trees 47 Low Low Low Avoid Freezing 3-5 Days
Peanuts 22 High Low Low Avoid Freezing 3-4 Days
Potatoes 17 High High High 2400 Degree Days 5-8 Days
Rice 25 Low Low Low 2400 Degree Days 10-13 Days
Sorghum 22 High High High 105-120 Degree Days 3-4 Days
Soybeans 17 Low Low High 2400 Degree Days 1-2 Days
Strawberries 17 Low Low Low 200-1200 chill hrs 6-10 Days
Sugar Beets 47 High Low Low 1800 Degree Days 1-2 Days
Sunflowers 14 Low Low Low Avoid Freezing 5-7 Days
Sweet Potatoes 17 Low Low Low 2500 Degree Days 6-8 Days
Tobacco 30 High Low Low 2000 Degree Days 1-3 Days
Tomatoes 13 Low Low Low 200 Degree Days 6-9 Days
Wheat 34 High Low High Avoid Freezing 2-3 Days

Livestock

There are four types of livestock in SimFarm, all of which have specific food requirements, need water, and breed new livestock. Animals' value can be increased by making a barn available for their use.

Animal Life expectancy Monthly food requirements Mates after
Cow 20 years 1/4 bale 15-20 months
Pig 15 years 1/8 bale 8 months
Horse 20 years 1/4 bale 4 years
Sheep 10 years 1/16 bale 3 months

See also

External links


Strategy wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From StrategyWiki, the free strategy guide and walkthrough wiki

SimFarm
Box artwork for SimFarm.
Developer(s) Maxis
Publisher(s) Maxis, Mindscape
Designer(s) Eric Albers, Mike Perry
Release date(s)
MS-DOS
Mac OS
Windows
Genre(s) Simulation
System(s) MS-DOS, Windows, Mac
Mode(s) Single player
Rating(s)
ELSPA: Ages 3++
ESRB: Kids to Adults
Preceded by SimLife
Followed by SimTower
Series Sim

SimFarm, developed by Maxis in 1993, challenges players to build and manage a virtual farm. It is a spin off from the original SimCity series.

Objective

Mirroring duties on a real farm, SimFarm puts players in charge of building up the land, placing the buildings, buying and selling livestock and planting crops. A weather and season system are in place as well presenting the same kind of challenges found in a real world farm. As with SimCity, there are disasters that can wreak havoc on the player's farm. Tornados, droughts, pests, and dust storms are some of the events that can disrupt farm crops and harvests.

SimFarm also has a small town included in its simulation. This town is reminiscent of SimCity in its form and function. The player may interact with the town occasionally by suggesting new tile types and joining competitions with livestock (such as sending in a prize pig to potentially earn a blue ribbon and a cash prize.) Suggesting an airport to be built in the town will usually cause its construction, thus unlocking the ability to buy and use a crop duster.

The homestead in SimFarm is where the player lives and is expanded at the beginning of each game year if the player has made enough money in the previous year.

SimFarm allows the player to choose a location derived from the region and climate of one of nine areas of the US or to design one's own climate by selecting average winds, rainfall, and temperatures.

The game package also included a teacher's guide to teaching with Sim Farm with black line masters for photocopying for the class and a user's manual. These were printed and included in the box.

Table of Contents

SimFarm/Table of Contents

editSim series

Maxis · SimEarth · SimAnt · SimLife · SimFarm · SimTower · SimHealth · SimIsle · SimTown · SimGolf · SimTunes · SimPark · SimSafari · SimAnimals

Non-Maxis · SimTheme Park · SimCoaster · Sid Meier's SimGolf

Sub-series: The Sims · SimCity · Spore


Gaming

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Wikia Gaming, your source for walkthroughs, games, guides, and more!

SimFarm

Developer(s) Maxis
Publisher(s) Maxis
Designer(s) Will Wright
Release date 1993
Genre Simulation
Mode(s) Single player
Age rating(s) ESRB: E
Platform(s) PC, Mac
Media Floppy disk, CD-ROM
Credits | Soundtrack | Codes | Walkthrough

Sim Farm is a simulation game released in 1993 by Maxis and developed by the legendary Will Wright.

The game is a spin-off of the SimCity series, using the title "SimCity's Country Cousin". The player takes control of a large, empty plot of land, with the goal of turning it into a thriving farm.

Options at the player's disposal include buildings (barns, storage sheds, silos), farm equipment (tractors, trucks, plows, etc.), crops (from corn to sorghum, apples to oranges, and everything in between), and even livestock (cows, pigs, lambs, etc.)

Disasters, weather, and attempting to support a fledgling nearby town are among the challenges the player will face, along with the inherent challenge of growing crops and raising livestock.

External Links

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