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Siuslaw language: Wikis

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Siuslaw
Šáayušła
Geographic
distribution:
Oregon
Genetic
classification
:
Oregon Coast Penutian ?
 Siuslaw
Subdivisions:
Siuslaw lang.png

Pre-contact distribution of Siuslaw

Siuslaw (also Upper Umpqua) is one of the three Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians located on the southwest Oregon Pacific coast in the United States.

Language

The Siuslawan language is extinct. It was last spoken in the 1970s. It consists of two similar dialects:

  • Siuslaw (proper)
  • Lower Umpqua

The documentation consists of a 12 page vocabulary of both dialects by James Owen Dorsey, three months of fieldwork by Leo J. Frachtenberg in 1911 with a non-English speaking native speaker of the Lower Umpqua dialect and her Alsean husband (who spoke it as a second language), audio recordings of vocabulary from both dialects by Morris Swadesh in 1953, and a few hours of fieldwork with three Siuslaw (proper) speakers by Dell Hymes in 1954. Frachtenberg (1914, 1922) and Hymes (1966) are publications based on their material.

Bibliography

  • Dorsey, James Owen. (1884). [Siuslaw vocabulary, with sketch map showing villages, and incomplete key giving village names October 27, 1884]. Smithsonian Institution National Anthropological Archives. siris-archives.si.edu/ipac20/ipac.jsp?uri=full=3100001~!85861!0
  • Frachtenberg, Leo. (1914). Lower Umpqua texts and notes on the Kusan dialect. In Columbia University contributions to Anthroplogy (Vol. 4, pp. 151-150).
  • Frachtenberg, Leo. (1922). Siuslawan (Lower Umpqua). In Handbook of American Indian languages (Vol. 2, pp. 431-629).
  • Hymes, Dell. (1966). Some points of Siuslaw phonology. International Journal of American Linguistics, 32, 328-342.

External links

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