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  Slamannan Railway
Legend
Continuation backward
Slamannan and Borrowstounness Railway
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Bo'ness Low Junction
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Hub
Manuel
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Transverse track Continuation to left
Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway
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Causewayend
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Sheildhall Branch and Causewayend Junctions
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Standburn Branch Junction
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Roughrigg Colliery
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Bathgate Branch of Monkland Railways
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Westflield
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Coulston Branch
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Bathgate and Coatbridge Railway
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Bathgate (Upper) (B&CR)
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Bathgate (Lower)
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Bathgate and Coatbridge Railway
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Blackstone
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Avonbridge
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Jawcraig Branch
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Glenellrig
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Slamannan
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Slamannan Junction
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North Monkland Railway
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Longriggend
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Arden
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Whiterigg
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Ballochney Railway
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Dykehead Junction
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Arbuckle
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Ballochney Railway

The Slamannan Railway was an early mineral railway built near Slamannan, Falkirk, Scotland, in an area containing coal and iron ore.

The railway was Incorporated on 3 July 1835 and was opened on 31 August 1840.[1][2] Its main function was intended to be the transportation of coal and passengers, but iron ore was also carried. It was built to the Scotch gauge of 4 ft 6 in (1,372 mm).[1][3][4]

The line included Inclined planes.[5]

In 1848 it merged with other railway lines to become the Monkland Railways; which in turn were absorbed by the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway.[1][2]

Contents

Formation of the railway

The original 1835 Act of Parliament was to raise £86,000 (Pound sterling) of joint stock capital and a loan of £20,000. A further Act was obtained on 3 July 1837 to raise an additional £29,000 by shares.[3] Half the capital was provided by the Ballochney Railway.[6]

The route

It ran from the northern branch of the Ballochney Railway to the Union Canal at Causeway End, a distance of 12.5 miles (20 km).[1][3]

In 1844 a one mile extension at Causeway End, to link it to the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway was authorised.[2]

Glasgow - Edinburgh passenger services

On 31 August 1840, the Slamannan Railway arranged passenger services between Glasgow and Edinburgh.[7] Passengers travelled from Glasgow, via the Glasgow and Garnkirk Railway, the Monkland and Kirkintilloch Railway, the Ballochney Railway and the Slamannan Railway to Causeyway End on the Union Canal.[7] Two through passenger trains per day ran in both directions; they linked with boats on the Union Canal, and reduced the journey time between the two cities to four hours.[7]

Attempted take over and change of gauge

The Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway started negotiations in 1844 to take over the various Monkland Railways; and at the same time the railway companies applied for permission to change to Standard gauge.[5] In May 1846, the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway was refused permission to amalgamate and it decide to withdraw on 31 December 1846. The Caledonian Railway by that time had taken over the Wishaw and Coltness Railway and the Glasgow and Garnkirk Railway.[5]

The Ballochney Railway, the Monkland and Kirkintilloch Railway and the Slamannan Railway all obtained aurthorisation to change to Standard gauge between 1845 and 1846.[5] The three railways changed their gauge on 26 July and 27 July 1847.[5]

Amalgamation to form the Monkland Railways

On 14 August 1848 the Slamannan Railway merged with the Monkland and Kirkintilloch Railway and the Ballochney Railway to become the Monkland Railways.[1][2]

A 4.5 mile (7 km) extension - Slamannan and Borrowstounness Railway - was built to Bo'ness, which opened on 17 March 1851.[1] The 26 June 1846 Act of Parliament authorising this extension, also allowed the railway to lease the harbour at Bo'ness but this lease was not followed through.[1]

The Monkland Railways were absorbed by the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway by an Act of Parliament, dated 5 July 1865, effective from 31 July 1865.[1] A day later (on 1 August 1865) the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway was absorbed into the North British Railway.

Links to other lines and modes of transportation

The following connections existed on the line between Dykehead and Causewayend.

Location Distance from Dykehead Description
Dykehead Jn 0m 1c Dykehead Branch
Limerigg Jn 4m 9c Limerigg Branch
North Monkland Jn 5m 8c North Monklands line
Strathavon Jn 7m 19c Short branch 63 chains in length to Strathavon. Later extended to various mines.
Blackston Jn 10m 26c Branch to Bathgate (Whiteside) via Westfield
Bowhouse Jn 13m 18c Mineral branches
Causeweyend incline top 15m 42c Extension and original northern terminus of the Slamannan Railway
Causewayend incline bottom 15m 77c
Causewayend station 16m 8c A connection to the Union Canal existed in the very early days of the line. A basin serving the Linlithgow foundry can still be seen today.
  • At Raywards (Airdrie) the Slamannan line joined the network in that area. [8][9]

References

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Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Awdry, Page 160 - 161
  2. ^ a b c d Lewin
  3. ^ a b c Whishaw
  4. ^ Robertson
  5. ^ a b c d e Thomas
  6. ^ Popplewell
  7. ^ a b c Lewin, Chapter IX
  8. ^ Airey's Railway map of Scotland (1875) from the National library of Scotland digital archive (maps)
  9. ^ National library of Scotland digital archive (maps

Sources

  • Awdry, Christopher (1990). Encyclopaedia of British Railway Companies. Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 1-8526-0049-7. OCLC 19514063.  
  • Jowett, Alan (March 1989). Jowett's Railway Atlas of Great Britain and Ireland: From Pre-Grouping to the Present Day (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 1-8526-0086-1. OCLC 22311137.  
  • Lewin, Henry Grote (1925). Early British Railways. A short history of their origin & development 1801-1844. London: The Locomotive Publishing Co Ltd. OCLC 11064369.  
  • Popplewell, Lawrence. A Gazetteer of the Railway Contractors and Engineers of Scotland 1831 - 1914. (Vol. 1: 1831 - 1870 and Vol. 2: 1871 - 1914).. Bournmouth: Melledgen Press. ISBN 0-9066-3714-7. OCLC 19888025.  
  • Robertson, C.J.A. (1983). The Origins of the Scottish Railway System: 1722-1844 (1st ed.). Edinburgh: John Donald Publishers Ltd. ISBN 0-8597-6088-X.  
  • Thomas, John (1971). A Regional History of the Railways of Great Britain. Volume VI Scotland: The Lowlands and the Borders (1st edition ed.). Newton Abbot, Devon: David & Charles. ISBN 0-7153-5408-6. OCLC 16198685.  
  • Thomas, John; Paterson, Rev A.J.S. (1984). A Regional History of the Railways of Great Britain. Volume VI Scotland: The Lowlands and the Borders (2nd edition ed.). Newton Abbott, Devon: David & Charles. ISBN 0-9465-3712-7. OCLC 12521072.  
  • Whishaw, Francis (Reprinted and republished 1969) [1840]. The Railways of Great Britain and Ireland practically described and illustrated (3rd ed.). Newton Abbott: David & Charles (1842 edition - London: John Weale). ISBN 0-7153-4786-1.  




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