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Sligo
Sligeach
Location
Location of Sligo
centerMap highlighting Sligo
Irish grid reference
G685354
Statistics
Province: Connacht
County: County Sligo
Dáil Éireann: Sligo–North Leitrim
European Parliament: North–West
Dialling code: +353 71
Area: 12.9 km2 (5.0 sq mi)[1]
Elevation: 13 m

Population (2006)
 - Town:
 - Environs:


  17,892
  1,510[2]
Website: www.sligoborough.ie

Sligo (from the Irish: Sligeach meaning "shelly place" — (English pronunciation: /ˈslaɪɡoʊ/ "sly-go" Irish pronunciation: [ˈɕlʲɪɟəx]) is the county town of County Sligo in Ireland. The town is a borough and has a charter and a town mayor. It is the second largest urban area in Connacht (after Galway).[8]

Contents

History

A view over Sligo

Sligo's Irish name Sligeach - meaning shelly place - allegedly originates in the abundance of shellfish found in the river and its estuary, and from the extensive 'shell middens' or Stone Age food preparation areas in the vicinity.[9] [10] The river (now known as the Garavogue 'rough river' ) was also called the Sligeach.[10][11] The Ordnance Survey letters of 1836 state that "cart loads of shells were found underground in many places within the town where houses now stand". At that time shells were constantly being dug up during the construction of foundations for buildings. This whole area, from the river estuary at Sligo, around the coast to the river at Ballysadare Bay, is rich in marine resources which were utilised as far back as the Mesolithic period.

The significance of Sligo in the Early Neolithic period is demonstrated by the abundance of ancient sites close by, not least Carrowmore, on the Cuil Irra peninsula, 3 km (2 miles) from the town. The NRA excavation for the N4 Sligo Inner Relief Road in 2002 revealed an early Neolithic causewayed enclosure (c. 4000 B.C.) overlooking the town. It would have been enclosed by a ditch and palisade, and was perhaps an area of commerce and ritual. According to Edward Danagher, who excavated there, 'Magheraboy demonstrates the early Neolithic settlement of this area of Sligo, while the longevity of the activity on the site indicates a stable and successful population during the final centuries of the fifth millennium and the first centuries of the fourth millennium BC'.[12] Sligo town's first roundabout was constructed around a megalithic tomb (Abbeyquarter North, in Garavogue Villas [13]).

Maurice Fitzgerald, the Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, is generally credited with the establishment of the mediaeval town of Sligo, building the Castle of Sligo in 1245. Sligo was burned several times during the mediaeval period. In 1257, Geoffry O'Donnell, chief of Tirconnell, marched on Sligo and burned the town. The annalists refer to this Sligo as a sradbhaile ('street settlement'): a village or town not defended by an enclosure or wall, and consisting of one street. By the mid 15th century the town and port had grown in importance. Amongst the earliest preserved specimens of written English in Connacht is a receipt for 20 marks, dated August 1430, paid by Saunder Lynche and Davy Botyller, to Henry Blake and Walter Blake, customers of "ye King and John Rede, controller of ye porte of Galvy and of Slego". Over a century later an order was sent by the Elizabethan Government to Sir Nicholas Malby, Knight, willing him to establish "apt and safe" places for the keeping of the Assizes & Sessions, with walls of lime & stone, in each county of Connacht, "judging that the aptest place be in Sligo, for the County of Sligo…"[14] Sligo Abbey, the Dominican Friary, is the only mediaeval building left standing in the town (Bram Stoker, whose mother came from Sligo, has cited ghost stories about the abbey as part of the inspiration for his infamous novel, Dracula). The abbey was founded by Fitzgerald in 1253 but was accidentally destroyed by fire in 1414, and was rebuilt in its present form. When Frederick Hamilton’s soldiers sacked Sligo Town in 1642, the Abbey was burned and everything valuable in it was destroyed. Much of the structure, including the choir, carved altar and cloisters remains.

Between 1847 and 1851 over 30,000 people emigrated through the port of Sligo.[15] On the Quays, overlooking the Garavogue River, is a sculpted memorial to the emigrants. This is one of a suite of three sculptures commissioned by the Sligo Famine Commemoration Committee to honour the victims of the Great Famine. A plaque in the background, headed 'Letter to America, January 2, 1850' tells one family's sad story: "I am now, I may say, alone in the world. All my brothers and sisters are dead and children but yourself... We are all ejected out of Mr. Enright's ground... The times was so bad and all Ireland in such a state of poverty that no person could pay rent. My only hope now rests with you, as I am without one shilling and as I said before I must either beg or go to the poorhouse... I remain your affectionate father, Owen Larkin. Be sure answer this by return of post."

Sligo town recently highlighted its connections with Goon Show star and writer Spike Milligan by unveiling a plaque at the former Milligan family home at Number 5 Holborn Street.[16]

Education

Sligo has 9 primary schools (one of which is located outside the borough boundary) and 6 secondary schools (one of which is located outside the borough boundary). St Angela's College(university) and Sligo Institute of Technology are third-level colleges located in the town.

Transport

Sligo Hub & Gateway access

The main roads to Sligo are the N4 to Dublin, the N15 to Lifford, County Donegal; and the N16 to Blacklion, County Cavan. The section of the N4 road between Sligo and Collooney is made up of dual carriageway. The first phase of this road was completed in January 1998, bypassing the towns of Collooney and Ballysadare. An extension to this road was completed in September 2005, and is known as the Sligo Inner Relief Road.

O'Connell Street - the main street in the town - was pedestrianised on 15 August 2006. Plans for the proposed redevelopment and paving of this street were publicly unveiled on 23 July 2008 in The Sligo Champion. The newspaper later revealed that people were not in favour of the pedestrianisation of the street. The street was reopened to traffic in December 2009.

Sligo acquired a rail link to Dublin on 3 December 1862, with the opening of Sligo railway station.[17] Connections to Enniskillen and the north followed in 1881 and Limerick and the south in 1895. The line to Enniskillen closed in 1957 and passenger services to Galway-Ennis-Limerick closed in 1963. For many years CIE kept the latter line open for freight traffic, and although it is now disused, it forms part of the Western Rail Corridor redevelopment project. In 1966 Sligo railway station was renamed Mac Diarmada Station after Irish rebel Seán Mac Diarmada from County Leitrim.[18] Iarnród Éireann, Ireland's national railway operator, runs inter-city rail services between Sligo and Dublin Connolly.

Sligo Town and County Sligo are served by Sligo Airport, 8 km (5 miles) from Sligo town and close to Strandhill village, with Aer Arann flights to Dublin.

Sligo port handles small ships up to 2,000 metric tons deadweight (DWT).[19]

Bus Éireann operates 4 bus routes in the town: one serves the town centre and one which serves the western area of the town. The other two routes run from the town to Strandhill and Rosses Point respectively[20].

Development

The Garavogue River And Rockwood Parade (Right).

Like many towns in the west of Ireland, Sligo suffered for many years from a lack of development, mainly due to its relative isolation. However this has improved in most sectors in the past decade.

Development has occurred along the river Garavogue with the regeneration of J.F.K. Parade (2000), Rockwood Parade (1993-1997), and The Riverside (1997-2006), as well as two new footbridges over the river, one on Rockwood Parade (1996) and one on The Riverside (1999).

Media

There are four local newspapers in Sligo: the Sligo Weekender, the Northwest Xtra, The Sligo Champion and The Sligo Post.

The area has a local radio station, Ocean FM, which also broadcasts to Counties Donegal, Leitrim and Sligo. Sligo is also served by the West youth radio station I102-104FM.

Three members of Westlife (Mark Feehily, Shane Filan and Kian Egan) hail from Sligo.

Twin cities

See also

Gallery

External links

References

  1. ^ "Table 6 - Population and area of each Province, County, City, urban area, rural area and Electoral Division, 2002 and 2006" (PDF). Census 2006, Volume 1 - Population Classified by Area. Central Statistics Office. 2007-04-26. pp. pages 111-112. http://www.cso.ie/census/documents/census2006_Table_6.pdf. Retrieved 2007-10-10.  
  2. ^ "Table 7 - Persons in each town of 1,500 population and over, ..." (PDF). Census 2006, Volume 1 - Population Classified by Area. Central Statistics Office. 2007-04-26. pp. pages 119. http://www.cso.ie/census/documents/census2006_Table_7_and_12.pdf. Retrieved 2008-02-13.  
  3. ^ Census for post 1821 figures.
  4. ^ http://www.histpop.org
  5. ^ http://www.nisranew.nisra.gov.uk/census
  6. ^ Lee, JJ (1981). "On the accuracy of the Pre-famine Irish censuses". in Goldstrom, J. M.; Clarkson, L. A.. Irish Population, Economy, and Society: Essays in Honour of the Late K. H. Connell. Oxford, England: Clarendon Press.  
  7. ^ Mokyr, Joel; O Grada, Cormac (November), "New Developments in Irish Population History, 1700-1850", The Economic History Review Volume 37 (Issue 4): 473–488, doi:10.1111/j.1468-0289.1984.tb00344.x, http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/120035880/abstract  
  8. ^ "County Profiles - Sligo". Western Development Commission. http://www.wdc.ie/countyprofiles_sligo.html. Retrieved 2008-05-13.  
  9. ^ Wood-Martin's History of Sligo, 1882
  10. ^ a b "History of Sligo". Sligo Borough Council - About Us. http://www.sligoborough.ie/asp/AboutUs/HistorySligo.asp. Retrieved 2008-05-13. "The scallop shells [...] were once abundant in the estuary at the mouth of the Garavogue - a river once known as the 'Sligeach', or 'shelly place', giving Sligo its name"  
  11. ^ Joyce, LL.D., M.R.I.A., P.W.. "Irish Local Names Explained". Library Ireland. libraryireland.com. http://www.booksulster.com/library/plnm/placenamesS.php. Retrieved 2007-07-03. "Sligo; (not correct)named from the river: Sligeach [Sliggagh], F. M., shelly river (slig, a shell).It is more likely to have originated from "Slige atha da" anglice "the place of two fords or crossings. These were at Cartron and Ballisodare (Ballydrehid) in the days when travel was on shanks mare. Ireland was heavily wooded hence most travel was coastal. Sligo was an place of importance on the north/south way. The Cuill Iarra peninsula lies in the middle between the Sligo River and Ballisodare Bay, with the Carrowkeel Megalithic Cemetery in the middle. This cemetery would have been an important place of pilgrimage for travellers to visit. Through elision etc the sound of the name altered down the centuries, hence the 'shell theory'."  
  12. ^ Danaher, Edward (2007). Monumental beginnings: the archaeology of the N4 Sligo Inner Relief Road. Wordwell Books. ISBN 978-1-905569-15-1.  
  13. ^ Bergh, Stefan (1995). Landscape of the monuments. A study of the passage tombs in the Cúil Irra region, Co. Sligo, Ireland. Stockholm: Riksantikvarieämbetet Arkeologiska Undersökningar. ISBN 91-7192-945-2.  
  14. ^ Wood-Martin, W.G.. History of Sligo, County and Town. From the accession of James 1. to the Revolution of 1688.. Vol. 2. Dublin: Hodge & Figgis.  
  15. ^ Norton, Desmond (2003). "Lord Palmerston and the Irish Famine Emigration: A Rejoinder". Cambridge University Press, The Historical Journal (46): 155–165.  
  16. ^ Wikipedia contributors (2008-05-13). "Spike Milligan". Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Spike_Milligan&oldid=212153979. Retrieved 2008-05-15.  
  17. ^ "Sligo station" (PDF). Railscot - Irish Railways. http://www.railscot.co.uk/Ireland/Irish_railways.pdf. Retrieved 2007-09-07.  
  18. ^ Gilligan, James (2006-12-19). "Restore name to Sligo rail station". Sligo Weekender. Sligo Weekender Ltd. http://www.sligoweekender.ie/news/story.asp?j=31127. Retrieved 2007-07-03.  
  19. ^ "A Profile of County Sligo". Sligo County Enterprise Board. http://www.sligoenterprise.ie/sligo_county_profile.html#sea. Retrieved 2007-02-09.  
  20. ^ "City/Town Services - Bus Éireann". Bus Éireann printed timetables. http://www.buseireann.ie/bubble.php?id=59#Sligo. Retrieved 2008-05-15.  
  21. ^ Wikipedia contributors (2008-05-06). "Crozon (on French Wikipedia)". Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crozon. Retrieved 2008-05-15.  
  22. ^ Wikipedia contributors (2008-05-15). (Allgäu) "Kempten (Allgäu) (on German Wikipedia)". Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kempten (Allgäu). Retrieved 2008-05-15.  
  23. ^ "Tallahassee Irish Society". http://www.irishtallahassee.org. Retrieved 2008-05-15.  
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Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Sligo (Sligeach in Irish) is the principal town in County Sligo in Northwest Ireland & Lakelands. It is the largest urban area in this region.

Understand

Traditionally a small, quiet coastal town (pop. 17,892; area 12.9 km2 or 5 sq mi), Sligo has experienced significant redevelopment since the 1990s and now offers much in the way of shopping, entertainment and eating out. It is a great base from which to explore the often underrated west and north west Atlantic coast of Ireland. A lot of new development has been situated along the Garavogue river, most notably the regeneration of J.F.K. and Rockwood Parades, consisting of shops, cafés, bars and a number of apartments as well as a new footbridge over the river itself.

O’Connell Street, the town's main street has been pedestrianised since Aug 2006, and two new shopping centers (The Quayside and Johnston's Court) have opened since 2005, bringing national and international chain-stores to the region.

Location

Sligo is surrounded by the Dartry Mountain range to the north, the Ox Mountains to the south, and Sligo Bay and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. The Dartry range includes the well-known Ben Bulben (sometimes called Ireland's table mountain). Knocknarea Mountain, located 5 km (3 mi) west of the town, is best known for the stone cairn at its summit (actually a burial mound dating to the Neolithic period).

Carrowmore, a prehistoric ritual landscape in County Sligo, less than 8 km (5 mi) from Sligo
Carrowmore, a prehistoric ritual landscape in County Sligo, less than 8 km (5 mi) from Sligo

Sligo's Irish name, Sligeach (pronounced SHLEE-gok, which means the place of shells), comes from the large number of shellfish found in the local river and its estuary, and from the Stone Age food preparation areas in the vicinity. The river (now known as the Garavogue) was originally also called the Sligeach. This whole area, from the river estuary at Sligo, around the coast to the river at Ballisodare Bay, was rich in marine resources, dating back as far as the Mesolithic period.

Sligo was a significant location as far back as the Early Neolithic period, as demonstrated by the numerous ancient sites close by. Particularly notable are the megalithic tombs at nearby Carrowmore. According to local archeological digs (when a new road was being built), 'Magheraboy [now a suburb of Sligo] demonstrates the early Neolithic settlement of this area of Sligo, while the longevity of the activity on the site indicates a stable and successful population during the final centuries of the fifth millennium and the first centuries of the fourth millennium BC.'

The Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, Maurice Fitzgerald, is said to have established the medieval town of Sligo, building the Castle of Sligo in 1245. As a result, Sligo became an important crossroads strategically and commercially. Sligo Abbey is the only medieval building left standing in the town.

Twin cities

Sligo is twinned with three towns/cities (sister cities), namely:

There are regular trade and tourism links with these cities throughout the year.

  • There are three local newspapers in Sligo, each of which gives details of local news, sports and entertainment on a weekly basis. The Sligo Weekender is published on Tuesday while The Sligo Champion and the free The Sligo Post are both published on Wednesday.
  • A round of the World Rally Championship was based in Sligo on November 16th-18th, 2007. Rally Ireland was a great success and is due to return in 2009 after a fantastic first year.
  • Aer Arann [1] operate two flights per day from Dublin (IATA: DUB) (40 minute flight) to Sligo Airport (IATA: SXL), and four flights per week from Manchester (IATA: MAN) airport (80 minutes).

Sligo airport [2] is about 8 km (5 mi) west of the town, in Strandhill, but public transportation links are not great. Bus Éireann run buses (route 472) seven times a day (five times on Sa, not at all on Su) starting across the road from the bus station, picking-up and setting-down at the airport only on request. A taxi will cost you between €10 to €15, depending on number of passengers, time of day/night, Etc.

Córas Iompar Éireann

Both Iarnród Éireann and Bus Éireann are separate parts of a state-owned company, which is sometimes still known by its old name of CIE (Córas Iompar Éireann, which means Irish Travel Company). They both arrive at the same location in Sligo, at the junction of Strandhill Road and Lord Edward Street. The train station is called Stáisiúin Mhic Dhiarmada, named after Seán MacDiarmada, a signatory of the Proclomation of the Irish Republic in 1916, and originally from nearby County Leitrim.

  • Irish Rail (Iarnród Éireann), Lord Edward Street, (071) 916 9888, [3]. operates seven trains per day Monday to Saturday (with an extra eighth train at 7.07AM Monday to Friday) and six trains on Sunday from Dublin's Connolly Station. The trip takes a little over 3 hours and adult prices range from €26 to €35 with price reductions for children under 12, students with valid student ID and free travel for children under 3. Oddly enough, the price for a return journey is exactly the same as for a single one. If your travelling days are variable, travel Monday to Thursday or Saturday, as tickets are more expensive on Friday and Sunday (the busier days).  edit

By road

By bus

  • Bus Éireann (Irish Bus), Lord Edward Street, (071) 916 0066, [4]. Buses or coaches operate throughout the day from most major towns/cities.
    From Dublin: 6 buses daily M-Sa, 5 on Su and Public Holidays, journey time: 3 and a half to 4 hours.
    From Galway: 6 buses daily M-Sa, 5 on Su and Public Holidays, journey time 2 and a half hours.
    From Belfast: 3 buses daily M-Sa (change at Enniskillen), 2 on Su (change at Dungannon), journey time just under 4 hours.
    Bus Éireann prices are approximately half that of the train but buses can be a bit stuffy! Similar concessions/price reductions apply as for train travel.
     edit
  • Feda O'Donnell Coaches (Bus Feda), (074) 954 8114 (), [5]. operate from Gweedore, County Donegal, and Galway as follows: From Gweedore (via Letterkenny): 2 buses daily M-Sa, 3 on F, 3 on Su, journey time 3 hours 15 minutes. From Galway (Cathedral): 2 buses daily M-Sa, 4 on F, 4 on Su, journey time 2 hours.  edit

By car

  • From Dublin take the N4 road west (approx. 210 km (130 mi), 2 and a half hours).
  • From Galway take the N17 road north (approx. 145 km (90 mi), 2 to 2 and a half hours).
  • From Belfast, Northern Ireland, take the M1 Motorway, which leads onto the A4. This becomes the N16 when you cross the border at Belcoo/Blacklion (approx. 200 km (125 mi), 3 to 3 and a half hours).

Get around

Sligo town, at 12.9km2 (5 sq mi), is small enough to walk from one end to the other in an hour.

Garavogue River, in Sligo
Garavogue River, in Sligo

Local buses

There are buses which run from the main bus station to Strandhill (Route 472) and Rosses Point (Route 473) (small nearby coastal towns) regularly. There are also two city services around the town and surrounding area (Route 478, runs M-Sa about every 20 minutes from Cartron (on the R291 Rosses Point Road), via the town center to Cairns Road and back again to Cartron and Route 478A, M-Sa every hour from the Bus Station via Strandhill Road to Carrowmore). There is also a Nightrider service (Route 478N F, Sa approximately hourly between 8:30PM-2:30AM) which leaves from Sligo Town to nearby towns of Collooney, Ballisodare, Strandhill and Rosses Point.

Parking

As in many parts of Ireland, parking spaces can be difficult to find, although most hotels and bed and breakfasts have their own free parking for residents only. If you wish to park in the town, there are a number of local authority operated car parks dotted around the town. To park in a public car park or on the street in most parts of the town centre, you must pay and display at the nearest meter. Parking costs €1.20 per hour (generally between the hours of 8:30AM-6:30PM. M-Sa, 12PM-6PM Su and Public holidays, although some locations have different pay times or days). Parking costs can be paid for by Euro coins, credit cards or mobile phone. You can prepay for your parking if you park outside these hours, i.e., If you leave you car overnight, you can pay for your parking from 8:30AM the next morning. Please note, if paying by coins, the machine does not give change, so you should try to have exact change available. You will, however, receive a parking disc for the remainder of the next hour, e.g., pay €2, and you get a disc for 1 hour 40 minutes. Some carparks allow for all-day parking at a special rate. The meters in these carparks will display this option. If you don't pay, or your time has run out, you may receive a parking ticket, with an on-the-spot fine of €40, or €80 if you park illegally in a wheelchair-user only zone (always marked, often with blue paint).

There are also some private car-parks which have different rates of payment (and different punishments if you don't pay). The (Catholic) Cathedral, for example, uses barriers, with payment of €3 when leaving the car-park. If you can leave your car until church services (mass) times, you may be able to leave without paying (but do you want to cheat the church?) Parking at Sligo General Hospital is metered, and costs €2.40 for up to four hours, or €4 for up to 24 hours. The local bus (Route 478) passes just outside the hospital every 20 minutes during the day, and costs 70 cent to bring you into town. If you don't pay for your parking at this carpark you are liable to be clamped, with a release fee of €65.

Directions

All the directions to places given in this guide to Sligo presume that you are walking. There may be other, faster ways of getting to where you're going (if you're driving/cycling for example), but if you follow these directions in a car or bike, you may find yourself travelling the wrong way down one of Sligo's many (sometimes confusing) one-way/pedestrianised streets.
Unless otherwise stated, directions to where to sleep are from the Train/Bus Station, and to everywhere else (i.e., See, Do, Etc.) are from the junction of Wine Street and O'Connell Street, standing with your back to the General Post Office (GPO), facing down the pedestrianised O'Connell Street.

  • Sligo Abbey (Dominican Friary), Abbey Street (From the GPO, turn left. After 40 m (44 yd), before the river, turn right onto Rockwood Parade (alongside the river). Walk 140 m (150 yd) to the second right onto Water Lane, and at the top of the lane, 90 m (98 yd) turn left onto Castle Street. Walk 200 m (220 yd) onto Abbey Street, with Abbey on the left (total distance of 455 m (498 yd)).), (071) 914 6406 (, fax: (071)914 9909). daily 10AM-6PM (last admission 5:15PM). Closed from mid-Dec until Feb.. founded by Maurice Fitzgerald in 1253, destroyed by fire in 1414, rebuilt in its present form; the Abbey was burned in 1642 and everything valuable in it was destroyed. Much of the structure, including the choir, carved altar and cloisters remain. Adult:€2.10, Senior:€1.30, Student:€1.10, Family:€5.80, Group Rate:€1.30.  edit
  • Famine Memorial, Quay Street Car-park (From the GPO, turn right. After 40 m (44 yd), turn right. Pass the City Hall on your right, Quayside Shopping Centre on your left, enter the car-park at the riverside (total distance of 270 m (295 yd)).). open all hours. One of a suite of three sculptures commissioned by the Sligo Famine Commemoration Committee to honour the victims of the Irish Potato Famine (1845–1849), when over 30,000 people emigrated through the port of Sligo, here commemorated by this sculprute.. A plaque in the background, headed 'Letter to America, January 2, 1850' tells one family's sad story. free.  edit
  • Sligo Rovers Football Club, The Showgrounds, Church Hill (From Exiting the train station, cross the road and continue straight ahead up Wolfe Tone Street. At the end of the street turn right up Churchill - the ground is approx half a mile on the right.), (071) 917 1212 (), [6]. * Model Arts and Niland Gallery, The Mall (From GPO, turn left. Cross the river, continue along Stephen Street, onto the Mall, gallery on left (total distance of 480 m (525 yd)).), (071) 914 1405 (, fax: (071) 914 3694), [7]. Tu-Sa: 10:00AM-5:30PM, Su: 11:00AM-4:00PM, M: Closed. Hosts fantastic permanent exhibition of Jack B. Yeats work (brother of the poet W.B. Yeats), along with local and travelling exhibitions. Beautiful Atrium Cafe (Bridgestone and Georgina Campbell guides recommended). Free wireless hotspot in the Cafe. Gallery exhibitions and visual events free, booking may be advisable for visual events; music, drama and comedy performances usually range from €10-€20.  edit Gallery exhibitions and visual events free, booking may be advisable for visual events; music, drama and comedy performances usually range from €10-€20.  edit
  • County Sligo Heritage and Genealogy Centre, Áras Reddan, Temple Street (From GPO, walk South down O'Connell Street for 200 m (220 yd), turn right onto John Street for 50 m (55 yd). Take left up Charles Street, and at the top (200 m (220 yd)) turn right onto Temple Street, Centre is on immediate right (total distance of 530 m (580 yd)).), (071) 914 3728 (), [8]. Searching for your Sligo roots? The Centre offers a full service to enquirers whose ancestors hailed from County Sligo.  edit
  • Sligo Races, Sligo Racecourse, Cleveragh Road (From GPO, turn left. After 40 m (44 yd), turn right onto Rockwood Parade. Take second right at 140 m (153 yd) (opposite Footbridge), onto Water Lane. At top of lane (200 m (220 yd)), go straight up Market Street and High Street. At the top of the hill, bear left onto Burton Street, then turn right onto Pearse Road. Take third left after 400 m (435 yd) (opposite Bed & Breakfast houses) onto Cleveragh Road. Racecourse is 550 m (600 yd) on left (total distance of 1.6 km (1 mi)).), (071) 918 3342 (, fax: (071) 916 2484), [9]. 6-8 race meetings per year, from May to Sep. €15/€10 concessions (children free).  edit
  • Solas Spa, Radisson SAS Hotel & Spa, Ballincar (from Train/Bus Station, turn left along Lord Edward Street for 200 m, turn left onto the Inner Relief Road (N4 road), cross the river/bay, and keep left. After 850 m turn left onto the R291, hotel is 2.9 km on this road, on the right (total distance of 3.9 km).), (071) 914 0008 (, fax: (071) 914 0005), [10]. Come to Sólás Spa & Wellness Centre at the Radisson SAS Hotel & Spa, Sligo and enjoy our spa experience with the latest in natural beauty, holistic therapies and spa breaks. €Splurge.  edit
  • Kitesurfing Lessons, with the north west's only kitesurfing school [11]
  • Boat Trips, on a former lifeboat [12]With local lifeboat crew. See seals, maybe even dolphins, stop and fish, or just take in the sights.
Statue of W.B. Yeats in Sligo
Statue of W.B. Yeats in Sligo
  • Yeats International Summer School, Yeats Memorial Building, Hyde Bridge (from GPO, turn left and Yeats Building is red-brick building about 20 m (22 yd) on your right), (071) 914 2693 (, fax: (071) 914 2780), [13]. in 2008, the school runs from Sa, Jul 26 to Fri Aug 8. The poet William Butler Yeats is much associated with Sligo. In particular "The Lake Isle of Innisfree" is a reference to a small island on nearby Lough Gill. Yeats, who spent much of his youth in Sligo and its environs, died in 1939 and is buried, under bare Ben Bulben's head in the graveyard in Drumcliffe, County Sligo. Tuition Fee (2008 prices): €375 for one week, €595 for two weeks.  edit

Buy

Most of the shops in Sligo are concentrated in a small area, based around O'Connell Street, Wine Street and Grattan Street. It also has a two new shopping centres, Johnston Court [14] and The Quayside [15]. The town has a huge range of the normal High Street shops, including most of the Irish and British chains. These include clothing, grocery, electronics, books, music, sports, fotwear, Etc., Etc. Apart from all of those, there are a number of one-off shops in Sligo, which make it well worth the visit. Just a small selection of these is outlined below.

  • The Cat and The Moon (Goldsmiths, Irish Craft Boutique and Art Gallery), 4 Castle Street (From GPO, turn left. After 40 m (44 yd), turn right onto Rockwood Parade alongside river, take second right onto Water lane, then left into Castle Street. Shop is 50 m (55 yd) on left (total distance of 320 m (350 yd)).), (071) 914 3686 (, fax: (071) 914 3686), [16]. M-Sa: 9AM-6PM. stocks a wide range of hand-made gold and silver jewellery (from their own workshop), both for retail sale and specially commissioned articles. The Irish Craft Boutique also features a huge selection of other Irish-made jewellery, glass, ceramics, textiles, furniture and handcrafts. The Art Gallery (upstairs) hosts regular exhibitions, usually promoting young local and other Irish Artists.  edit
  • Michael Kennedy Ceramics, Market Cross (From GPO, turn left. After 40 m (44 yd), turn right onto Rockwood Parade alongside river, take second right onto Water lane, then up the hill to shop on left (total distance of 300 m (328 yd)).), (071) 914 8844 (), [17]. M-Sa: 9AM-6PM. Unusual and quirky pieces of ceramic art sit alongside beautiful (but usable) dinner services in this shop of Sligo-based ceramic artist and potter, all hand-thrown here or in the artist's studio in Gort, County Galway  edit
  • Kate's Kitchen (Hopper and Pettit), 3 Castle Street (From GPO, turn left. After 40 m (44 yd), turn right onto Rockwood Parade alongside river, take second right onto Water Lane, then left onto Castle Street. Shop is 40 m on left (total distance of 310 m (340 yd)).), (), [18]. m-Sa: 9AM-6PM. Fabulous Delicatessen, with all types of food catered for, from home-baked hams to some of the finest chutneys, preserves known to man. Also contains a separate toiletries area (Hopper and Pettit), specialising in Crabtree & Evelyn and other fine ranges.  edit
This guide uses the following price ranges for a typical meal for one, including soft drink:
Budget under €15
Mid-range €15-€40
Splurge €40+

The choice of good quality restaurants in Sligo has improved immensely over the last few years. Please note, that all the hotels listed in the Sleep section below also have restaurants, and many have carvery lunches served at the bar.

  • Cafe Mauds, Unit 26, Quayside Shopping Centre (turn right at GPO, after 40 m (44 yd) turn right again onto Quay Street, entry to Quayside Shopping Centre is 120 m (130 yd) on the left-hand side (total distance of 156 m (170 yd)).), (071) 912 8447 (fax: (071) 912 8447), [19]. M-W 9:30AM-5:30PM, Th-F 9:30AM-7PM, Sa 9:30AM-6PM, Su noon-5.30PM. wraps, sandwiches, crepes, coffee, award winning ice-cream  edit
  • Eurobar, Stephen Street Car Park (Turn left at the GPO, cross Hyde Bridge. After 200 m (219 yd) opposite the County Library, at the side of the Bank of Ireland, enter Stephen Street car park on the right, Eurobar is on the left (total distance of 264 m (289 yd).), (071) 916 1788. Multi Bridgestone Award Winner. It's all about the coffee here, with Double Roasted Illy Coffee Beans, but only light snacks available to eat with your coffee.  edit
  • Java Riverside Café, 4 Rockwood Parade (Turn left at the GPO, walk 40 m (44 yd) and turn right down Rockwood Parade (alongside the river). Java is 230 m (252 yd) on right (total distance of 275 m (300 yd)).), (071) 914 9845 (fax: (071) 914 9845). M-Sa 9:30AM-5PM. Top quality hand-made sandwiches, wraps, Etc., and good coffee. Takeaways available. Busiest between 1PM-2PM  edit
  • Pepper Alley, Rockwood Parade (Turn left at GPO, walk 40 m (44 yd) and turn right down Rockwood Parade (alongside the river). Pepper Alley is 150 m (164 yd) on right (total distance of 195 m (213 yd)).), (071) 917 0720 (fax: (071) 917 0720). Busy sandwich bar, (especially at lunchtime) with some hot food also available.  edit
  • Poppadom Restaurant, 34 O'Connell Street (From the GPO, walk south down O'Connell Street, restaurant is 80 m (88 yd) on the left, Over Liber Bookshop), (071) 914 7171, [20]. Su-Th: 5:30PM-11PM, F-Sa: 5:30PM-midnight. Bridgestone best Indian Restaurant from 1999-2004, top quality Asian food, good mix of Indian, Thai, Indonesian, Etc  edit
  • Fiddler's Creek, Rockwood Parade (Turn left at GPO, walk 40 m (44 yd) and turn right down Rockwood Parade (alongside the river). Fiddler's Creek is 150 m (164 yd) on right (total distance of 195 m (213 yd))), (071) 914 1866 (, fax: (071) 914 1864), [21]. daily: lunch: noon-7:30PM; restaurant: 7PM-10PM; bar food: 5:30PM-9:45PM. Steaks, chicken, pasta dishes. Speedy, friendly service, busy especially at weekends. Separate menu also available at the bar. (Please note, e-mail address is NOT for bookings)  edit
  • Mardees, 25 Castle Street (From GPO, turn left, walk 40 m (44 yd) and turn right down Rockwood parade (alongside the river). After 140 m (153 yd) turn right onto Water lane. At the top of the Lane, turn left onto Castle Street, restaurant is 70 m (77 yd) on the right, over the Centra supermarket (total distance of 345 m (377 yd)).), (071) 914 7637. New restaurant, with small but interesting menu, bright decor, very friendly efficient staff. Excellent value "Early bird" menu from 5PM to 7PM with huge portions!  edit
  • Bistro Bianconi, O'Connell Street (From the GPO, walk south down O'Connell Street, past Tobergal Lane on the left, restaurant is 150 m (164 yd) on the left.), (071) 914 1744, [22]. M-Sa: lunch: 12:30PM-2:30PM, dinner: 5:30PM-late. Award winning Pizza and Italian restaurant. Very friendly staff, owner Pat Grimes always on hand to assist with your choices. All pizzas baked in a traditional wood oven (visible from the street). Complete menu available as take-away from High Street branch; Phone (071) 914-7000.  edit
  • Café Bar Deli (The Leftbank), 15 rear Stephens Street (From the GPO, turn left, cross Hyde Bridge. Immediately after the bridge, enter the riverside walk (keeping the river on your right). Restaurant is on the left, over the Garavogue bar (total distance of 115 m (126 yd)).), (071) 914 0100 (, fax: (071) 914 0104), [23]. W-SU: 6:00PM-10:00PM. Overlooking the Garavogue river, Café Bar Deli has some of the the best views in Sligo town. Serves good quality Mediterranean food, pizza, pasta, Etc. Staff always welcoming and friendly. Bookings not usually required, although large groups may need to call ahead.  edit
  • Lemongrass Restaurant, Clarence Hotel, Wine Street (From the GPO, turn right, pass Quay Street, and Clarence Hotel is on right, past entry to Wine Street Car Park), (071) 911 0023, [24]. Part of a chain of Asian restaurants, good value. Great for groups of friends or family, with plenty of large tables, and numerous platters on the menu, designed for sharing!  edit
  • Coach Lane (Donaghy's Bar), 1-2 Lord Edward Street (From the GPO, turn right, and walk 300 m (328 yd) through three sets of traffic lights. Restaurant is over Donaghy's Pub, on the left-hand side of the road, just before the Inner Relief Road (N4 road) (total distance of 311 m (340 yd)).), (071) 916 2417. 5PM-10PM daily. Offers some unusual dishes (e.g., ostrich with marsala); lots of local produce, including steaks, lobster, salmon. Also plenty of salads, pasta and chicken dishes. Cooking style ranges from traditional to spicy and much in between.  edit
Rockwood Parade, Sligo, location of some great bars, clubs and restaurants on the riverside
Rockwood Parade, Sligo, location of some great bars, clubs and restaurants on the riverside
  • Fiddler's Creek, Rockwood Parade (Turn left at GPO, walk 40 m (44 yd) and turn right down Rockwood Parade (alongside the river). Fiddler's Creek is 150 m (164 yd) on right (total distance of 195 m (213 yd))), (071) 914 1866 (, fax: (071) 914 1864), [25]. Very lively bar, especially at weekends. In-house DJ and live bands 4 or 5 nights a week, also show all major live sporting events on large screens.  edit
  • McGarrigles, 11 O'Connell Street (From the GPO, walk south down O'Connell Street, bar is opposite Tobergal Lane on the right (total distance of 127 m (139 yd)).), (071) 917 1193.  edit
  • McHughs, Grattan Street (From the GPO, walk south down O'Connell Street, turn left at the top of the street (200 m (218 yd)) onto Grattan Street, bar is on the right (total distance of 220 m (241 yd)).), (071) 914 2030.  edit
  • Shoot The Crows, Market Cross, Grattan Street (Turn left at GPO, walk 40 m (44 yd) and turn right onto Rockwood Parade. After 140 m (153 yd) turn right onto Water lane. At top of lane, turn right onto Grattan Street, Bar is first on right (total distance of 282 m (308 yd)).), (071) 916 2554 (), [26]. Old Sligo pub (founded 1876) with an eccentric past (not least where the name comes from!), long narrow pub, the music collection reflects the eclectic tastes of the owner, Ronan "Uisce" Waters, comprising of Latin, Soul, Motown, Jazz, Funk, Blues, Reggae, Punk, Afrobeat and Irish Traditional among others, and the most unusual front window you've ever seen.  edit
  • The Stables (O'Hehir's), Wine Street (From the GPO, turn right, pub is on the left, about 90 m (98 yd).), (071) 914 2280.  edit
  • Envy Nightclub (NV), Teeling Street (Turn left at GPO, walk 40 m (44 yd) and turn right onto Rockwood Parade. After 140 m (153 yd) turn right ont oWater Lane. At top of lane, turn left onto Castle Street, and turn right after 120 m (131 yd) turn right onto Teeling Street, club is 70 m (77 yd) on the left (total distance of 468 m (512 yd)).), (071) 914 4721 (), [27]. Tu-Su: 11:30PM-Late. With four bars and three dance floors, this is a busy club, especially catering to students of the near-by Institute of Technology, Sligo. €6-€12 depending on night.  edit
  • Toffs Nightclub, J.F.K Parade (Turn left at GPO, walk 40 m (44 yd) and turn right onto Rockwood Parade. Walk the length of the parade, cross Thomas Street, club is on the right (total distance of 360 m (394 yd)).), (071) 916 1250. Th-Su: 11:00PM-Late.  edit
  • Velvet Room Nightclub, Kempten Promenade (Turn left at GPO, walk 40 m (44 yd) and turn right onto Rockwood Parade. Walk the length of the parade, turn left after 200 m (219 yd), cross bridge, then immediate right onto Kempten Promenade. Club is on the left (total distance of 400 m (437 yd)).), (071) 914 4721 (), [28]. Sligo's newest Nightclub, on two levels, four bars, two dance floors, gears itself towards the twenty-something, more discerning clubber.  edit
This guide uses the following price ranges for a standard double room:
Budget under €50
Mid-range €50-€150
Splurge €150+
  • Most bed and breakfasts are situated on the roads into and out of the town, especially on the old Dublin road (Pearse Road, R287), Cairns Hill (head out the R287, turn left at the traffic lights just at the Gaelic Football Pitch, Markievicz Park) and the Bundoran road (N16). Most cost around €30 to €35 per person sharing.

Why do the Holidays Apartments have the same phone number?

Milligan Place, Yeats Village, Clarion Holiday Village and The Grove Clarion are all managed by Albanne Tourism [29]

  • Milligan Place, Lake Isle Road (From Train/Bus Station, turn left along Lord Edward Street for 200 m, crossing the N4 Inner Relief Road, then cross Adelaide Street (the R287) onto Wine Street for 400 m, cross the river and take second left onto Holborn Street for 110 m, then turn right, Apartments on left (total distance of 760 m).), (071) 913 8945 (, fax: (071) 914 9768), [30]. Brand new 1 and 2-bed apartments and town houses, normally used as student accommodation for the loca lInstitute of Technology, but let as holiday accommodation during the summer months. Named after comedian Spike Milligan, whose father was born nearby. €Budget.  edit
  • Yeats Village, Ballinode (From Train/Bus Station, turn left along Lord Edward Street for 200 m, crossing the N4 Inner Relief Road, then cross Adelaide Street (the R287) onto Wine Street for 400 m, cross the river and continue along Stephen Street, The Mall (passing the Model Arts and Niland Gallery and the Hospital), down Molloway Hill, onto the N16. Pass the Institute of Technology, Sligo on the left, and take the first right. Yeats Village is on the left (total distance of 2.2 km).), (071) 913 8945 (), [31]. self-catering homes and apartments (sleeping up to 6 people), within 10 minutes walk of town centre. €Budget.  edit
  • Clarion Holiday Village and The Grove Clarion, Clarion Road, Ballinode (From Train/Bus Station, turn left along Lord Edward Street for 200 m, turn left onto Inner Relief Road (N4 in the direction of Lifford), cross the river at Hughes Bridge (road is now the N15), at second set of traffic lights turn right after Markievicz House (on hilltop on the right), onto Duck Street, left at the roundabout, past St. John's Hospital, right after St. Jospeh's (RC) Church, onto Clarion Road, Clarion Village is on the left about 600 m down this road (total distance of 2.3 km).), (071) 913 8945 (), [32]. 2, 3 and 4-bed apartments, within 15 minutes walk of town. €Budget.   edit
  • Gateway Apartments, Ballinode (From Train/Bus Station, turn left and left again, cross over hughs bridge and turn right at second set of traffic lights. Head straight through mini roundabout and continue for 800 meters and turn left at traffic lights. Gateway Apartments is on the left hand side here.), (071) 91 45618 (, fax: (071) 9147317), [33]. checkin: 24/7; checkout: 11AM. New 1 and 2-bed apartments let as holiday apartments for the summer months. Reception is open 24 hours and we have a team of staff to ensure a pleasant stay. A free internet terminal at reception and free internet in both apartment bedrooms. Book online on our website url="http://www.gatewayapartments.ie" €Budget.  edit
  • Ballyeasken House, Templeboy, Co (Travel south on N4 and then turn onto the N59 and head west for 24km. Continue through Templeboy village past church along main road. After 1 mile the house is on the left hand side of the road with a stone wall and red garage door.), (096) 47435 (), [34]. Family home near Easkey and Enniscrone €Splurge.  edit
  • Harbour House (Sligo International Tourist Hostel), Finisklin Road (From Train/Bus Station, turn left along Lord Edward Street for 200 m, turn left onto Inner Relief Road (N4 in the direction of Lifford), then turn left at the Poitin Still Pub (yellow building on right) onto Finisklin Road, under the bridge and past Brooks, Nibblers Cafe, the Ursuline College and Value Centre, Harbour House straight in front of you near roundabout (total distance of 650 m).), (071) 917 1547 or (086) 259 8293 (mobile phone) (, fax: (071) 917 1547), [35]. In the old Harbour master's house, built in 1840s, advance booking advised, especially in summer season. Budget; from €18 (dormitory) to €40 (single).  edit
  • White House Hostel, Markievicz Road (From Train/Bus Station, turn left along Lord Edward Street for 200 m, crossing the N4 Inner Relief Road, then cross Adelaide Street (the R287) onto Wine Street for 400 m, cross the river and take first left onto Markievicz Road, Hostel is 100 m ahead on right (total distance of 720 m).), (071) 914 5160 (fax: (071) 914 4456). Open from 01 Mar to 31 Oct. Budget; €14 (dormitory).  edit
  • The Railway Hostel, 1 Union Place (From Train/Bus Station, turn left along Lord Edward Street for 200 m, turn left onto Inner Relief Road (N4 in the direction of Lifford), hostel is on the left at rear of train station (total distance of 540 m).), (071) 914 4530.  edit
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  • Radisson SAS Hotel & Spa, Ballincar (from Train/Bus Station, turn left along Lord Edward Street for 200 m, turn left onto the Inner Relief Road (N4 road), cross the river/bay, and keep left. After 850 m turn left onto the R291, hotel is 2.9 km on this road, on the right (total distance of 3.9 km).), (071) 914 0008 (, fax: (071) 914 0005), [36]. €Mid range to Splurge.  edit
  • Clarence Hotel, Wine Street (From Train/Nus Station, turn left along Lord Edward Street for 400 m, hotel is on your left, just past the Gaeity Cinema), (071) 916 2145 (), [37]. Newly renovated small hotel, in a very central location. Weekend nightclub is busy.  edit
  • Clarion Hotel, Clarion Road (From Train/Bus Station, turn left along Lord Edward Street for 200 m, turn left onto Inner Relief Road (N4 in the direction of Lifford), cross the river at Hughes Bridge (road is now the N15), at second set of traffic lights turn right after Markievicz House (on hilltop on the right), onto Duck Street, left at the roundabout, past St. John's Hospital, right after St. Jospeh's (RC) Church, onto Clarion Road, Clarion Village is on the left about 600 m down this road (total distance of 2.3 km).), (071) 911 9000 (, fax: (071) 911 9001), [38]. New 4* hotel in Elizabethan former hospital, 76 bedrooms, 91 suites. €Mid-range to €Splurge.  edit
  • The Glasshouse (formerly the Silver Swan Hotel), Swan Point, Hyde Bridge (from Train/Bus Station, turn left along Lord Edward Street for 200 m, crossing the N4 Inner Relief Road, then cross Adelaide Street (the R287) onto Wine Street for 400 m, hotel os on the left just at the river (total distance of 550 m).), (071) 919 4300 or (1890) 300 106 (only available from within Ireland) (, fax: (071) 919 4301), [39]. Dramatic design, resembling the prow of a ship, on the river bank. Sligo's newest hotel, with funky interiors. The View bar is a stylish lounge, with great views across the river. AA Rosette Award winning restaurant. €Mid-range-€Splurge.  edit
  • Innisfree Hotel, High Street (from Train/Bus Station, continue straight down Wolfe Tone Street for 200 m, turn left onto Upper John Street, cross the Inner Relief Road (N4 Road) onto John Street. Continue straight for 300 m past Harmony Hill onto Grattan Street, and take right turn at Lady Erin Statue, hotel is on the right part way up the hill (total distance of 810 m).), (071) 914 2014 (). €Budget.  edit
  • Sligo City Hotel, Quay Street (from Train/Bus Station, turn left along Lord Edward Street for 200 m, cross the Inner Relief Road (N4 road) onto Wine Street for 250 m, take first left (in front of H. Lyons Department Store) onto Quay Street, hotel is on the right, past City hall (total distance of 580 m).), (071) 914 4000 (, fax: (071) 914 6888), [40]. €Mid-range.  edit
  • The Sligo Park Hotel, Old Dublin Road (from Train/Bus Station, continue straight down Wolfe tone Street for 200 m, turn left onto Upper John Street, cross the Inner Relief Road (N4 Road) and take next right onto Temple Street. Pass the (RC) Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception and follow road to Mail Coach Road, until second set of traffic lights at Christie's supermarket/petrol/gas station. Turn right onto Pearse Road, and hotel is 1 km ahead on left (total distance of 2.5 km).), (071) 919 0400 (, fax: (071) 916 9556), [41]. €Mid-range-€Splurge.  edit

Contact

Telephones

As elsewhere in Ireland, phone numbers in Sligo comprise an area code (071) and a local number (7 digits). All phone numbers shown in this guide display both the area code and the local number. When calling from a landline within the same area, you can ignore the area code, or leave it in, as you wish. If you are calling from another area within Ireland or from a mobile phone, you must use the area code. Likewise, if you are calling internationally, you must use the following format: Your international access code + 353 + 71 + the local number, i.e., you drop the 0 from the area code.

  • County Sligo Library, Stephen Street (From the GPO, turn left, cross the river onto Stephen Street, pass two roads on left, library is 200 m (219 yd) on left.), (071) 914 2212 (), [43]. Tu-Sa: 9:30AM-5PM; Th: 9:30AM-8PM. Free Internet facilities available for members and visitors. Four terminals available for adults, and two specifically for children (with kid-friendly software). Also fourteen further terminals available in Reference Library, on nearby Bridge Street (Reference Library Opening Hours; M-F: 10AM-12:45PM and 2PM-4:45PM). Quietest in the mornings. Visitors should bring some ID (such as home Library card), and will be required to sign an "internet agreement form". Free.  edit
  • Atrium Cafe (Model Arts and Niland Gallery), The Mall (see Do section above), (071) 914-1405 (, fax: (071) 914-3694), [44]. Tu-Sa: 10:00AM-5:30PM; Su: 11:00AM-4:00PM; M: Closed. Free wi-fi internet hotspot.  edit

Stay safe

Crime is relatively low by most European standards but not very different. As with any sizeable town in Ireland, visitors and locals alike can feel intimidated by the large crowds hanging around outside fast food outlets, pubs and clubs, usually between the hours of midnight and 3:00AM on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. These areas are generally well patrolled by Gardaí(police), but best avoided, where possible.

If you need the emergency services (Gardaí, ambulance, fire service, coast guard or mountain rescue) dial 999 or 112 from any phone.

Cope

Publications

There are three weekly newspapers in Sligo. If you're looking for entertainment listings, either the Champion or Weekender are fine, if you want to know what's the official business/political line on something local in Sligo, the Champion is required reading, the Post is hardly worth the price (it's free).

  • The Sligo Champion (The Champion), [45]. Weekly, Wednesday. Sligo's oldest surviving newspaper (over 150 years old) containing all the local news and events for the town and county of Sligo and local parts of the surrounding counties of Roscommon, Leitrim, Donegal and Mayo €1.70.  edit
  • Sligo Weekender, [46]. weekly, Tuesday. For a paper called The Weekender, it comes out mid-week, but otherwise good entertainment listings €1.70.  edit
  • The Sligo Post, [47]. weekly, Tuesday. This paper is quite new, and mostly contains a few sensationalised local stories, with the remainder of the paper taken up with advertising features, Etc. It's free, so you may as well get one, but the Champion or Weekender have better listings. freesheet.  edit

Religious services

There are places of worship all over the town; your hotel or Bed and Breakfast should be able to direct you to one nearby. If not, though, the following are centrally located in the town.

Roman Catholic

  • Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception (St. Mary's), Temple Street (From GPO, turn right along Wine Street. At second set of traffic lights, turn left onto Adelaide Street, through next set of traffic lights, onto Temple Street, church is on the left), (071) 916 2670 (, fax: (071) 915 0797), [48]. Mass Times: Su 7:30PM (on Saturday for Sunday Vigil), 8:30AM, 10:30AM, 12Noon, 5PM(in Polish), 7PM; M-F: 7:15AM, 8:15AM, 10:30AM; Sa: 8:15AM, 10:30AM, 7PM (First Friday of each month). Beautiful 130+ year-old building in a Normano–Romano–Byzantine style, it is the only example of a Romanesque style Cathedral built during the 19th century in Ireland.  edit
  • St. Anne's, Cranmore (Turn left at GPO, walk 40 m (44 yd) and turn right onto Rockwood Parade. Walk the length of the parade, turn right, take second left into Chapel Lane, Church is in front of you), (071) 914 5028. Mass Times: Su 7:30PM (on Saturday for Sunday Vigil), 10:30AM, 12:30PM 7PM; M-F: 10AM, 6:15PM, Sa: 10AM.  edit
  • St. Joseph's, Ballytivnan, (071) 914 2422 (), [49]. Mass Times: Su 7:30PM (On Saturday for Sunday Vigil), 11AM, 12:30PM, 7PM; M-Sa: 10AM.  edit
  • Dominican Friary (Holy Cross Friary), High Street, (071) 914 2700 (fax: (071) 914 6533), [50]. Mass Times: Su 7:30PM (On Saturday for Sunday Vigil), 9:30AM, 11AM, 12:15PM, 7PM; M-Sa: 10:30AM and 1:05PM. Holy Cross is the only church run by a religious order (rather than directly by the diocese) in the Diocese of Elphin.  edit

Church of Ireland/Anglican

  • The Cathedral Church of St Mary the Virgin and St John the Baptist, John Street, (), [51]. Service of Holy Communion Su: 8:30AM, 1st, 3rd and 5th Su: 10:30AM. Morning Prayer Services 2nd & 4th Su: 10:30AM..   edit
Glencar Waterfall, approximately 15 km (10 mi) from Sligo
Glencar Waterfall, approximately 15 km (10 mi) from Sligo

Sligo is very well located for exploring the Northwest Ireland and Lakelands area of Ireland, and the following are very easily accessible as day trips:

County Sligo.

  • Carrowmore, on the Knocknarea peninsula. The site of a prehistoric ritual landscape. Around 30 megalithic tombs can be seen in Carrowmore today, older than Newgrange or Knowth (in the east of Ireland) and which even predate the Egyptian Pyramids.  edit
  • Rosses Point, (Follow the R291 from Sligo). Rosses Point is a pretty little village with a beautiful golden sandy beach, perfect for families. The Atlantic Ocean is cold for swimming, but perfectly safe here  edit
  • Strandhill, (Follow the R292 from Sligo). The village itself is not as pretty as Rosses Point, but is undergoing much renovation, and has a great walking beach. NOTE, it is not safe to swim here. It is, however, a great surfing beach.  edit
  • Knocknarea Mountain (Queen Maedbh's Cairn), Strandhill (Follow the R292 from Sligo, signposted on the left). Just over 1000 ft (305 m) high, and can be climbed in 20 to 40 minutes. Fantastic views of the coast-line with a very large cairn or burial mound on the summit, which local legend says is the grave of the ancient Celtic warrior Queen Maedbh (pronounced May-v). Climbers are now requested NOT to climb on the cairn or to use the stones from the cairn due to much damage in recent years. An old local tradition has it that a climber should bring a stone from the bottom of the mountain and place it on the cairn on the top. Failure to do so, according to the legend, will result in your dreams being haunted by the Queen Maeve herself!  edit
  • Ben Bulben. Prominent table mountain, dominating the landscape to the North. Can be climbed at certain points in about 1 hour or so. It is said to be the final resting place of Diarmuid and Gráinne, the eloping lovers from the Fenian cycle of Irish mythology.  edit
  • Coney Island, (Follow the R292, about 4km on the right, watch for small finger signpost.). Said to have given its name to its better known namesake in New York City. In Irish it translates as Oilean na gCoiníní (Island of the Rabbits, Coinín means rabbit). If you're feeling adventurous, and the tide is out, you can drive across the strand to the island. Do check with locals regarding tide times, as almost every year tourists (and locals) get stuck in the sand.  edit

County Donegal. The forgotten county, Donegal has some of the best scenery anywhere in Ireland. It is also probably the least developed county (from a tourist perspective) in Ireland, due to it's relative isolation, and proximity to the border with Northern Ireland.

County Leitrim. The least densely populated county in Ireland, and suffered much from emigration, particularly during the 1950s to 1990s. In recent years the population has started to rise, and consequently, more development is occuring all over the county.

  • Glencar Waterfall, Glencar, County Leitrim (take the N16 road north from Sligo in the direction of Manorhamilton, watch for signs to the left to Glencar, approximately 15 km (10 mi) from Sligo). Beautiful waterfall in a small narrow glen, immortalised by the poet W.B. Yeats in his poem, The Stolen Child: Where the wandering water gushes/From the hills above Glencar,/In pools among the rushes/That scarce could bathe a star.  edit

County Mayo.

  • Achill Island, stunning beaches making it a family holiday favourite.

County Galway.

  • Galway is a thriving, bustling, university city, very popular with tourists, and well worth the 140 km (90 mi) trip down the N4/N17.
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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

There is more than one meaning of Sligo discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia. We are planning to let all links go to the correct meaning directly, but for now you will have to search it out from the list below by yourself. If you want to change the link that led you here yourself, it would be appreciated.


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

English

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Wikipedia

Proper noun

Singular
Sligo

Plural
-

Sligo

  1. A county in the Republic of Ireland
  2. A town in the county of Sligo, Ireland.

Translations

  • Irish: Sligeach

Simple English

Sligo is a town in County Sligo, Ireland. It is the largest town in the county and the second largest rural area in Connauct after Galway city. It is home to Sligo Rovers F.C. who play in the Eircom Premier Division and came sixth in the 2007 season. Sligo has a population of around 20,000 and has many tourist attractions.



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