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Slovak American
EugeneACernan.jpgMichael Strank.jpgPaul Newman in Carnation, Washington June 2007 cropped.jpg
Štefan Banič.jpgJim caviezel.jpg
Notable Slovak Americans:
'Eugene Cernan'
'Michael Strank'
'Paul Newman'
'Jozef Murgaš'
'Štefan Banič'
'James Caviezel'
Total population
Slovak or Czechoslovak
1,239,167 Americans
[1]

0.44% of the US population

Regions with significant populations
Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Ohio, Indiana,Illinois
Languages

American English, Slovak language

Religion

Roman Catholicism, Protestantism, Greek Catholicism

Slovak Americans are Americans of Slovak descent.

In the 1990 Census Slovak Americans made up the second-largest portion of Slavic ethnic groups. There are currently about 1.2 million people of Slovak (or Czechoslovak) descent living in the United States. [1]

Contents

Population

Distribution of Slovak Americans according to the 2000 census,

History

Slovak immigration to the United States began in the 1870s and peaked with over 50,000 people coming in 1905 alone. Many Slovakians sought refuge from persecution and poverty in their homeland, which during this time period was onder the reign of the Austria-Hungary Empire. The majority of them were skilled or unskilled general laborers, miners, and farmers. A great deal of them settled in the small towns and cities in southwestern Pennsylvania and extreme eastern Ohio. Several small towns and cities, such as Connellsville, Pennsylvania are known to obtain a strong Slovak heritage amongst its residents.

Notable Slovak Americans

See List of Slovak Americans

See also

References

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