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Slovak Republic
Slovenská republika
Flag Coat of arms
AnthemNad Tatrou sa blýska
"Lightning Over the Tatras"

Location of  Slovakia  (green)

– on the European continent  (light green & grey)
– in the European Union  (light green)  —  [Legend]

Capital
(and largest city)
Bratislava
48°09′N 17°07′E / 48.15°N 17.117°E / 48.15; 17.117
Official language(s) Slovak
Ethnic groups  85.8% Slovak,
9.5% Hungarian, 1.9% Roma,
2.8% other minority groups
Demonym Slovak
Government Parliamentary republic
 -  President Ivan Gašparovič
 -  Prime Minister Robert Fico
 -  President of National Council Pavol Paška
Independence
 -  from Austria–Hungary October 28, 1918 
 -  from Czechoslovakia January 1, 1993 
EU accession May 1, 2004[1]
Area
 -  Total 49,035 km2 (123)
18,932 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) negligible
Population
 -  2001 census 5,379,455 (109th)
 -  Density 111/km2 (88th)
287/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2008 estimate
 -  Total $119.464 billion[2] (58th)
 -  Per capita $22,096[2] (40th)
GDP (nominal) 2008 estimate
 -  Total $95.404 billion[2] (57th)
 -  Per capita $17,646[2] (40th)
Gini (2008) 19.5 (low) (1st)
HDI (2007) 0.880 (high) (42nd)
Currency Euro ()2 (EUR2)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 -  Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Drives on the right
Internet TLD .sk3
Calling code +4214
.1 Czechoslovakia split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia; see Velvet Divorce.^ Nevertheless, without a referendum and over the objections of Czechoslovak President Vaclav Havel, the nationalist Czech and Slovak prime ministers agreed to Czechoslovakia's division into two independent states: the Czech Republic and Slovakia.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

^ Slovak visa you need to contact the Slovak embassy in Iran, for the contacts please see http://www.slovak-republic.org/visa-embassies/of-slovakia/#iran .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Does he apply visa in Austria, Czech Republic near Slovakia?
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]


.2 Before 2009: Slovak Koruna
3 Also .eu, shared with other European Union member states.
^ She is under Worker Registration Scheme in this Scheme European members have to work one year but she work from 12 may 2008 to 19 april 2009.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Since we dont have Slovak or any EU embassy in Liberia ,and also restrict to travel other neighboring country can I apply tourist visa from India.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Minimum coverage shall be 30000,-EUR. Family members of EU or EEA nationals (except family members of Slovak citizens) do not need to submit a travel medical insurance.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]


4 Shared code 42 with Czech Republic until 1997.
.The Slovak Republic (short form: Slovakia en-us-Slovakia.ogg /sloʊˈvɑːkiə/ ; Slovak: About this sound Slovensko , long form About this sound Slovenská republika ) is a landlocked country in Central Europe[3][4] with a population of over five million and an area of about 49,000 square kilometres (19,000 sq mi).^ Slovak-Republic.org says: May 25th, 2009 at 8:34 pm Hi Deepak, if you have valid Shengen Visa, you don’t need Visa for Slovakia nor for Austria, as all of the countries are in the Shengen Area.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Slovak-Republic.org says: September 7th, 2009 at 6:49 pm Hi Douglas, he should contact either the embassy in Turkey or the closest embassy, in UK. .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Muhammad Arif says: December 21st, 2009 at 5:49 pm If my Shengen visa is issued by the embassy of a country in Shengen area, can i start my journey from another country in Shengen area and visit the country that issued the visa later during the same journey if I have a multiple visa or as the visa is issued by the embassy of say Slovakia I have to start my journey from Slovakia and then go to other shengen countries.PLease help me in this respect .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

.Slovakia borders the Czech Republic and Austria to the west, Poland to the north, Ukraine to the east and Hungary to the south.^ Does he apply visa in Austria, Czech Republic near Slovakia?
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Czech republic, you don´t need visa to Slovakia, as both of the countries are in Schengen area.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

The largest city is its capital, Bratislava. The second largest city is Košice. .Slovakia is a member state of the European Union, NATO, UN, OECD, WTO, UNESCO and other international organizations.^ Slovakia is part of the Schengen Area – territory of 23 countries of the European Union + 2 associated countries of the European Economic Area, which agreed on the abolition of border controls between themselves.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Internal Politics European Union Neighbouring Countries Visa State Symbols .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

.The Slavs arrived in the territory of present day Slovakia in the fifth and sixth centuries AD during the Migration Period.^ With this visa the foreigner is allowed to stay on the territory of Slovakia during the period of its validity and for the first 3 months it allows him/her to travel accross Schengen countries .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

.In the course of history, various parts of today's Slovakia belonged to Samo's Empire (the first known political unit of Slavs), Great Moravia, Kingdom of Hungary,[5] the Austro-Hungarian Empire or Habsburg Empire, and Czechoslovakia.^ From the tenth to the early twentieth centuries, Slovakia formed a part of the Kingdom of Hungary.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

^ Hungarians live almost entirely in the southern part of the country in the regions adjoining the Danube river and the border with Hungary.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

^ Most of the 150,000-strong German population living in Slovakia and a part of the Hungarian minority fled or were expelled after 1945.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

An independent Slovak state briefly existed during World War II, during which Slovakia was a dependency of the Nazi Germany 1939–1944. From 1945 Slovakia once again became a part of Czechoslovakia. .The present-day Slovakia became an independent state on January 1, 1993 after the peaceful dissolution of its federation with the Czech Republic.^ Nevertheless, without a referendum and over the objections of Czechoslovak President Vaclav Havel, the nationalist Czech and Slovak prime ministers agreed to Czechoslovakia's division into two independent states: the Czech Republic and Slovakia.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

^ January 14, 2010, 10:14 am Cloudy -1°C Forecast January 14, 2010 day Intermittent clouds -1°C night Intermittent clouds -6°C Weather Forecast Climate in Slovakia .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ On the borders of Slovakia, a foreigner can be called to demonstrate sufficient funds for the whole stay (as stated in visa), which is 57,-EUR per person per day.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

Slovakia is a high-income advanced economy[6][7] with one of the fastest growth rates in the EU and OECD.[8] The country joined the European Union in 2004 and the Eurozone on January 1, 2009. Slovakia together with Slovenia are the only former Communist nations to be part of the European Union, Eurozone, Schengen Area and NATO simultaneously.

Contents

History

Before the fifth century

A Roman inscription at the castle hill of Trenčín (178–179 AD).
Radiocarbon dating puts the oldest surviving archaeological artifacts from Slovakia – found near Nové Mesto nad Váhom – at 270,000 BC, in the Early Paleolithic era. These ancient tools, made by the Clactonian technique, bear witness to the ancient habitation of Slovakia.
Other stone tools from the Middle Paleolithic era (200,000 – 80,000 BC) come from the Prévôt cave near Bojnice and from other nearby sites. The most important discovery from that era is a Neanderthal cranium (c. 200,000 BC), discovered near Gánovce, a village in northern Slovakia.
Archaeologists have found prehistoric Homo sapiens skeletons in the region, as well as numerous objects and vestiges of the Gravettian culture, principally in the river valleys of Nitra, Hron, Ipeľ, Váh and as far as the city of Žilina, and near the foot of the Vihorlat, Inovec, and Tribeč mountains, as well as in the Myjava Mountains. The most well-known finds include the oldest female statue made of mammoth-bone (22 800 BC), the famous Venus of Moravany. The statue was found in the 1940s in Moravany nad Váhom near Piešťany. Numerous necklaces made of shells from Cypraca thermophile gastropods of the Tertiary period have come from the sites of Zákovská, Podkovice, Hubina, and Radošinare. These findings provide the most ancient evidence of commercial exchanges carried out between the Mediterranean and Central Europe.
.From around 500 BC, the territory of modern-day Slovakia was settled by Celts, who built powerful oppida on the sites of modern-day Bratislava and Havránok.^ Purpose of the visit (if traveling around Slovakia then it should specified where the invited person will stay and who will pay the costs – inviting person or the invited).
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

Biatecs, silver coins with the names of Celtic Kings, represent the first known use of writing in Slovakia. .From 2 AD, the expanding Roman Empire established and maintained a series of outposts around and just north of the Danube, the largest of which were known as Carnuntum (whose remains are on the main road halfway between Vienna and Bratislava) and Brigetio (present-day Szöny at the Slovak-Hungarian border).^ Hungarians live almost entirely in the southern part of the country in the regions adjoining the Danube river and the border with Hungary.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

^ Main languages: Slovak, Hungarian, Romani, German, Ruthene/Ukrainian .
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

Near the northernmost line of the Roman hinterlands, the Limes Romanus, there existed the winter camp of Laugaricio (modern-day Trenčín) where the Auxiliary of Legion II fought and prevailed in a decisive battle over the Germanic Quadi tribe in 179 AD during the Marcomannic Wars. The Kingdom of Vannius, a barbarian kingdom founded by the Germanic Suebian tribes of Quadi and Marcomanni, as well as several small Germanic and Celtic tribes, including the Osi and Cotini, existed in Western and Central Slovakia from 8–6 BC to 179 AD.
Left: celt coin Biatec
Right: 5 slovak crowns with Biatec in front
.The Bronze Age in Slovakia went through three stages of development, stretching from 2000 to 800 BC. Major cultural, economic, and political development can be attributed to the significant growth in production of copper, especially in central Slovakia (for example in Špania Dolina) and north-west Slovakia.^ Slovakia is bordered by Poland to the north, Hungary to the south, Austria and the Czech Republic to the west, and Ukraine to the east.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

Copper became a stable source of prosperity for the local population. After the disappearance of the Čakany and Velatice cultures, the Lusatian people expanded building of strong and complex fortifications, with the large permanent buildings and administrative centers. Excavations of Lusatian hill-forts document the substantial development of trade and agriculture at that period. The richness and the diversity of tombs increased considerably. The inhabitants of the area manufactured arms, shields, jewelry, dishes, and statues. The arrival of tribes from Thrace disrupted the people of the Calenderberg culture, who lived in the hamlets located on the plain (Sereď), and also in the hill forts located on the summits (Smolenice, Molpí). .The local power of the "Princes" of the Hallstatt culture disappeared in Slovakia during the last period of the Iron Age after strife between the Scytho-Thracian people and the Celtic tribes, who advanced from the south towards the north, following the Slovak rivers.^ My friend who is South Korean, He is in Slovakia at his friend’s house.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Slovakia is bordered by Poland to the north, Hungary to the south, Austria and the Czech Republic to the west, and Ukraine to the east.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

^ With this visa the foreigner is allowed to stay on the territory of Slovakia during the period of its validity and for the first 3 months it allows him/her to travel accross Schengen countries .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

The great invasions of the 4–7th centuries

In the second and third centuries AD the Huns began to leave the Central Asian steppes. They crossed the Danube in 377 AD and occupied Pannonia, which they used for 75 years as their base for launching looting-raids into Western Europe. However, Attila's death in 453 brought about the disappearance of the Hun tribe. In 568 a proto-Mongol tribe, the Avars, conducted their own invasion into the Middle Danube region. The Avars occupied the lowlands of the Pannonian Plain, established an empire dominating the Carpathian Basin. In 623, the Slavic population living in the western parts of Pannonia seceded from their empire after a revolution led by Samo, a Frankish merchant.[9] After 626 the Avar power started to gradually decline.[10]

Slavic states

The Slavic tribes settled in the territory of present-day Slovakia in the 5th century. Nowadays western Slovakia was the centre of Samo's empire in the 7th century. A Slavic state known as the Principality of Nitra arose in the 8th century and its ruler Pribina had the first known Christian church of Slovakia consecrated by 828. Together with neighboring Moravia, the principality formed the core of the Great Moravian Empire from 833. The high point of this Slavonic empire came with the arrival of Saints Cyril and Methodius in 863, during the reign of Prince Rastislav, and the territorial expansion under King Svätopluk I.

The era of Great Moravia (830–896)

Central Europe in the 9th century. Eastern Francia in blue, Bulgaria in orange, Great Moravia under Rastislav (870) in green. The green line marks the borders of Great Moravia under Svatopluk I (894). Please note that some of the borders of Great Moravia are under debate
Great Moravia arose around 830 when Moimír I unified the Slavic tribes settled north of the Danube and extended the Moravian supremacy over them.[11] When Mojmír I endeavoured to secede from the supremacy of the king of East Francia in 846, King Louis the German deposed him and assisted Moimír's nephew, Rastislav (846–870) in acquiring the throne.[12] The new monarch pursued an independent policy: after stopping a Frankish attack in 855, he also sought to weaken influence of Frankish priests preaching in his realm. Rastislav asked the Byzantine Emperor Michael III to send teachers who would interpret Christianity in the Slavic vernacular. Upon Rastislav's request, two brothers, Byzantine officials and missionaries Saints Cyril and Methodius came in 863. Cyril developed the first Slavic alphabet and translated the Gospel into the Old Church Slavonic language. Rastislav was also preoccupied with the security and administration of his state. Numerous fortified castles built throughout the country are dated to his reign and some of them (e.g., Dowina, sometimes identified with Devín Castle)[13][14] are also mentioned in connection with Rastislav by Frankish chronicles.[15][16]
During Rastislav's reign, the Principality of Nitra was given to his nephew Svatopluk as an appanage.[14] The rebellious prince allied himself with the Franks and overthrew his uncle in 870. Similarly to his predecessor, Svatopluk I (871–894) assumed the title of the king (rex). .During his reign, the Great Moravian Empire reached its greatest territorial extent, when not only present-day Moravia and Slovakia but also present-day northern and central Hungary, Lower Austria, Bohemia, Silesia, Lusatia, southern Poland and northern Serbia belonged to the empire, but the exact borders of his domains are still disputed by modern authors.^ In 1918, Slovakia was joined with Bohemia, Moravia, Austrian Silesia and Ruthenia in the state of Czechoslovakia.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

^ Slovakia is bordered by Poland to the north, Hungary to the south, Austria and the Czech Republic to the west, and Ukraine to the east.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

^ Their properties were confiscated, between 70,000 and 90,000 were expelled to Hungary, and a further 44,000 were resettled in Bohemia and Moravia.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

[11] [17] Svatopluk also withstood attacks of the nomadic Magyar tribes and the Bulgarian Empire, although sometimes it was he who hired the Magyars when waging war against East Francia.[18]
In 880, Pope John VIII set up an independent ecclesiastical province in Great Moravia with Archbishop Methodius as its head. He also named the German cleric Wiching the Bishop of Nitra.
After the death of King Svatopluk in 894, his sons Mojmír II (894–906?) and Svatopluk II succeeded him as the King of Great Moravia and the Prince of Nitra respectively.[14] However, they started to quarrel for domination of the whole empire. Weakened by an internal conflict as well as by constant warfare with Eastern Francia, Great Moravia lost most of its peripheral territories.
In the meantime, the Magyar tribes, possibly having suffered defeat from the similarly nomadic Pechenegs, left their territories east of the Carpathian Mountains, invaded the Carpathian Basin and started to occupy the territory gradually around 896.[19] Their armies' advance may have been promoted by continuous wars among the countries of the region whose rulers still hired them occasionally to intervene in their struggles.[20]
Both Mojmír II and Svatopluk II probably died in battles with the Magyars between 904 and 907 because their names are not mentioned in written sources after 906. In three battles (July 4–5 and August 9, 907) near Bratislava, the Magyars routed Bavarian armies. Historians traditionally put this year as the date of the breakup of the Great Moravian Empire.
Great Moravia left behind a lasting legacy in Central and Eastern Europe. The Glagolitic script and its successor Cyrillic were disseminated to other Slavic countries, charting a new path in their cultural development. The administrative system of Great Moravia may have influenced the development of the administration of the Kingdom of Hungary.

Kingdom of Hungary (1000–1919)

Following the disintegration of the Great Moravian Empire in the early 10th century, the Hungarians gradually annexed the territory comprising modern Slovakia. In the late 10th century, south-western areas of the present-day Slovakia became part of the rising Hungarian principality, which became the Kingdom of Hungary after 1000. Thereafter the region became an integral part of the Hungarian state until the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1918. The ethnic composition became more diverse with the arrival of the Carpathian Germans in the 13th century, and in the 14th century the Jews.
A significant decline in the population resulted from the invasion of the Mongols in 1241 and the subsequent famine. However, in medieval times the area of the present-day Slovakia was characterized rather by burgeoning towns, construction of numerous stone castles, and the cultivation of the arts.[21] In 1465, King Matthias Corvinus founded the Hungarian Kingdom's third university, in Pozsony (Bratislava), but it was closed in 1490 after his death.[22]
After the Ottoman Empire's expansion into Hungary and the occupation of Buda in the early 16th century, the center of the Kingdom of Hungary (under the name of Royal Hungary) shifted to Pozsony ( in Slovak: Prespork at that time, currently Bratislava) which became the capital city of Royal Hungary in 1536. But the Ottoman wars and frequent insurrections against the Habsburg Monarchy also inflicted a great deal of destruction, especially in rural areas. As the Turks withdrew from Hungary in the late 17th century, the importance of the territory comprising modern Slovakia decreased, although Bratislava retained its status as the capital of Hungary until 1848, when it was transferred to Buda.[citation needed]
During the revolution of 1848–49 the Slovaks supported the Austrian Emperor, hoping for independence from the Hungarian part of the Dual Monarchy, but they failed to achieve their aim.[citation needed] Thereafter relations between the nationalities deteriorated (see Magyarization), culminating in the secession of Slovakia from Hungary after World War I.[23]

Interwar Czechoslovakia

In 1918, Slovakia and the regions of Bohemia and Moravia formed a common state, Czechoslovakia, with the borders confirmed by the Treaty of Saint Germain and Treaty of Trianon. In 1919, during the chaos following the breakup of Austria-Hungary, Czechoslovakia was formed with numerous Germans and Hungarians within the newly set borders. A Slovak patriot Milan Rastislav Štefánik (1880–1919), who helped organize Czechoslovak regiments against Austria-Hungary during the First World War, died in a plane crash during the fighting. In the peace following the World War, Czechoslovakia emerged as a sovereign European nation.[citation needed]
During the Interwar period, democratic Czechoslovakia was allied with France, and also with Romania and Yugoslavia (Little Entente); however, the Locarno Treaties of 1925 left East European security open. Both Czechs and Slovaks enjoyed a period of relative prosperity. .Not only was there progress in the development of the country's economy, but in culture and in educational opportunities as well.^ For its part, the 1992 Slovak constitution gave minorities the right to develop their culture, to deal in their own language with state officials, and to be educated both in Slovak and in their mother tongues.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

The minority Germans came to accept their role in the new country and relations with Austria were good. Yet the Great Depression caused a sharp economic downturn, followed by political disruption and insecurity in Europe.[24]
Thereafter Czechoslovakia came under continuous pressure from the revisionist governments of Germany and Hungary. Eventually this led to the Munich Agreement of September 1938, which allowed Nazi Germany to partially dismember the country by occupying what was called the Sudetenland, a region with a German-speaking majority and bordering Germany and Austria. .The remainder of "rump" Czechoslovakia was renamed Czecho-Slovakia and included a greater degree of Slovak political autonomy.^ For most of the twentieth century, Slovakia was a part of Czechoslovakia, although a separate Slovak state was briefly established as a satellite of Nazi Germany.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

Southern and eastern Slovakia, however, was claimed back by Hungary at the First Vienna Award of November 1938.[citation needed]

World War II

After the Munich Agreement and its Vienna Award, Nazi Germany threatened to annex part of Slovakia and to allow the remaining regions to be partitioned by Hungary or Poland unless independence is declared. Thus, Slovakia seceded from Czecho-Slovakia in March 1939 and allying itself, as demanded by Germany, with Hitler's coalition.[25] The government of the First Slovak Republic, led by Jozef Tiso and Vojtech Tuka, was strongly influenced by Germany and gradually became a puppet regime in many respects. Most Jews were deported from the country and taken to German labour camps. Thousands of Jews, however, remained to labor in Slovak work camps in Sered, Vyhne, and Nováky.[26] Tiso, through the granting of presidential exceptions, has been credited with saving as many as 40,000 Jews during the war, although other estimates place the figure closer to 4,000 or even 1,000.[27] Nevertheless, under Tiso's government 83% of Slovakia's Jewish population, a total of 75,000 individuals, were murdered.[28] Tiso became the only European leader to actually pay Nazi authorities to deport his country's Jews.[29][30] .After it became clear that the Soviet Red Army was going to push the Nazis out of the eastern and central Europe, an anti-Nazi resistance movement launched a fierce armed insurrection, known as the Slovak National Uprising, in the end of summer 1944. A bloody German occupation and a guerilla war followed.^ After World War II, Hungarians experienced substantial discrimination at the hands of the Czechoslovak, Slovak and occupation authorities.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

Territory of Slovakia was liberated by Soviet and Romanian forces by the end of April 1945.

Rule of the Communist party

.After World War II, Czechoslovakia was reconstituted and Jozef Tiso was hanged in 1947 for collaboration with the Nazis.^ After World War II, Hungarians experienced substantial discrimination at the hands of the Czechoslovak, Slovak and occupation authorities.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

^ At the end of the World War II, southern Slovakia was reincorporated in the restored Czechoslovak state, and Ruthenia was ceded to Ukraine, which was then a part of the Soviet Union.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

More than 80,000 Hungarians[31] and 32,000 Germans[32] were forced to leave Slovakia, in a series of population transfers initiated by the Allies at the Potsdam Conference.[33] This expulsion is still a source of tension between Slovakia and Hungary.[34] .Out of about 130,000 Carpathian Germans in Slovakia in 1938, by 1947 only some 20,000 remained.^ By the 1990s only 3,000-6,000 Jews remained.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

^ Some German communities in the Carpathians are reported still to use a form of High German.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

^ Most of the 150,000-strong German population living in Slovakia and a part of the Hungarian minority fled or were expelled after 1945.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

[35]
.Czechoslovakia came under the influence of the Soviet Union and its Warsaw Pact after a coup in 1948. The country was occupied by the Warsaw Pact forces (with the exception of Romania) in 1968, ending a period of liberalization under the leadership of Alexander Dubček.^ At the end of the World War II, southern Slovakia was reincorporated in the restored Czechoslovak state, and Ruthenia was ceded to Ukraine, which was then a part of the Soviet Union.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

In 1969, Czechoslovakia became a federation of the Czech Socialist Republic and the Slovak Socialist Republic.[citation needed]

Establishment of the Slovak Republic

The end of Communist rule in Czechoslovakia in 1989, during the peaceful Velvet Revolution, was followed once again by the country's dissolution, this time into two successor states. .In July 1992 Slovakia, led by Prime Minister Vladimír Mečiar, declared itself a sovereign state, meaning that its laws took precedence over those of the federal government.^ Beginning in 1992, however, nationalist Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar displayed increasing authoritarian tendencies, sparking fears for the rights of minorities, while the more general weakness of democratic institutions in Slovakia provoked criticism from the United States and from European foreign ministers in October 1995.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

^ Nevertheless, without a referendum and over the objections of Czechoslovak President Vaclav Havel, the nationalist Czech and Slovak prime ministers agreed to Czechoslovakia's division into two independent states: the Czech Republic and Slovakia.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

^ On 31 December 1992, the union between the Czech lands and Slovakia formally dissolved and Slovakia became an independent state.
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Throughout the Autumn of 1992, Mečiar and Czech Prime Minister Václav Klaus negotiated the details for disbanding the federation. In November the federal parliament voted to dissolve the country officially on December 31, 1992. The Slovak Republic and the Czech Republic went their separate ways after January 1, 1993, an event sometimes called the Velvet Divorce..October 2009" style="white-space:nowrap;">[citation needed] Slovakia has remained a close partner with the Czech Republic, both countries cooperate with Hungary and Poland in the Visegrád Group.^ Cooperation in this field, such as cooperation with the relevant partners at the level of state administration, self-government, both profit and non-profit sectors, and at the international level.
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.Slovakia became a member of NATO on March 29, 2004 and of the European Union on May 1, 2004. On January 1, 2009, Slovakia adopted the Euro as its national currency.^ In 2004 Slovakia became a full member of both NATO and the EU. .
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^ On 31 December 1992, the union between the Czech lands and Slovakia formally dissolved and Slovakia became an independent state.
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^ The new Slovak government was aware that its minorities' policy would influence the speed of Slovakia's accession to the European Union.
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Geography

A topographical map of Slovakia
Slovak Landscape, Greater Fatra
The Slovak landscape is noted primarily for its mountainous nature, with the Carpathian Mountains extending across most of the northern half of the country. Amongst these mountain ranges are the high peaks of the Tatra mountains.[1] To the north, close to the Polish border, are the High Tatras which are a popular skiing destination and home to many scenic lakes and valleys as well as the highest point in Slovakia, the Gerlachovský štít at 2,655 metres (8,711 ft), and the country's highly symbolic mountain Kriváň.
Major Slovak rivers are the Danube, the Váh and the Hron. The Tisa marks the Slovak-Hungarian border for only 5 km.
The Slovak climate lies between the temperate and continental climate zones with relatively warm summers and cold, cloudy and humid winters. The area of Slovakia can be divided into three kinds of climatic zones and the first zone can be divided into two sub-zones.

Climate of lowlands

Gerlachovský štít (2655 m), highest peak in Slovakia
The average annual temperature is about 9 to 10 °C (48 to 50 °F). The average temperature of the hottest month is about 20 °C (68 °F) and the average temperature of the coldest month is greater than −3 °C (27 °F). This kind of climate occurs at Záhorská nížina and Podunajská nížina. It is the typical climate of the capital city Bratislava.[36]
The average annual temperature is about 8 to 9 °C (46 to 48 °F). The average temperature of the hottest month is about 19 °C (66 °F) and the average temperature of the coldest month is less than −3 °C (27 °F). This kind of climate can be found at Košická kotlina and Východoslovenská nížina. It is the typical climate of the city of Košice.[37]

Climate of basins

The average annual temperature is between 5 and 8.5 °C (41 and 47 °F). The average temperature of the hottest month is between 15 and 18.5 °C (59 and 65 °F) and the average temperature of the coldest month is between -6 to -3 °C (21 to 27 °F). This climate can be found in almost all basins in Slovakia. For example Podtatranská kotlina, Žilinská kotlina, Turčianska kotlina, Zvolenská kotlina. It is the typical climate for the towns of Poprad[38] and Sliač.[39]

Mountain climate

The average annual temperature is less than 5 °C (41 °F). The average temperature of the hottest month is less than 15 °C (59 °F) and the average temperature of the coldest month is less than −5 °C (23 °F). This kind of climate occurs in mountains and in some villages in the valleys of Orava and Spiš.

Demographics

Hlavná ulica (Main street) in Košice
The majority of the inhabitants of Slovakia are ethnically Slovak (85.8%). Hungarians are the largest ethnic minority (9.5%). Other ethnic groups, as of the 2001 census, include Roma with 1.7%,[40] Rusyns or Ukrainians with 1%, and other or unspecified, 1.8%.[1] .Unofficial estimates on the number of Roma population are much higher, around 9%.^ Other estimates put the number of Roma at between 350,000 and 500,000 (or up to 10% of the population).
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[41] .Before World War II,[42] 135,000 Jews lived in Slovakia.^ Although minorities living in Slovakia alleged discrimination against them during the period of the first Czechoslovak Republic (1918-1938), the most flagrant violation of their rights occurred during and after World War II. In the Holocaust, Nazis and their sympathizers deported and murdered almost all of Slovakia's Jewish population, which had numbered approximately 70,000 in 1939.
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^ After World War II, Hungarians experienced substantial discrimination at the hands of the Czechoslovak, Slovak and occupation authorities.
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^ At the end of the World War II, southern Slovakia was reincorporated in the restored Czechoslovak state, and Ruthenia was ceded to Ukraine, which was then a part of the Soviet Union.
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[43]
.The official language is Slovak, a member of the Slavic language family.^ For its part, the 1992 Slovak constitution gave minorities the right to develop their culture, to deal in their own language with state officials, and to be educated both in Slovak and in their mother tongues.
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.Hungarian is widely spoken in the southern regions and Ruthenian is used in some parts of the Northeast.^ Hungarians live almost entirely in the southern part of the country in the regions adjoining the Danube river and the border with Hungary.
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Minority languages hold co-official status in the municipalities in which the size of the minority population meets the legal threshold of 20%.[44]
In 2007 Slovakia was estimated to have a total fertility rate of 1.33.[1] (i.e., the average woman will have 1.33 children in her lifetime), which is significantly below the replacement level and is one of the lowest rates among EU countries.
In the 1990 U.S. Census Slovak Americans made up the second-largest portion of Slavic ethnic groups. According to the 1990 Census figures about 1.8 million Americans are of Slovak descent.[45]

Religion

The Slovak constitution guarantees freedom of religion. 60.4% of Slovaks identify themselves as Roman Catholics, 9.6% as nonreligious or atheist, 6% as Protestant, 5% as Eastern Orthodox; 19% chose "other" to identify themselves.[46] Generally only one third of church members regularly attend church services.[47] The pre-World War II population of the country included an estimated 90,000 Jews (1.6% of the population). After the genocidal policies of the Nazi era, only about 2,300 Jews remain today (0.04% of the population).[48]

Politics

Slovakia is a parliamentary democratic republic with a multi-party system. The last parliamentary elections were held on June 17, 2006 and two rounds of presidential elections took place on April 3, 2004 and April 17, 2004.
The Slovak head of state is the president (currently Ivan Gašparovič), elected by direct popular vote for a five-year term. Most executive power lies with the head of government, the prime minister (currently Robert Fico), who is usually the leader of the winning party, but he/she needs to form a majority coalition in the parliament. The prime minister is appointed by the president. The remainder of the cabinet is appointed by the president on the recommendation of the prime minister.
Slovakia's highest legislative body is the 150-seat unicameral National Council of the Slovak Republic (Národná rada Slovenskej republiky). Delegates are elected for a four-year term on the basis of proportional representation. Slovakia's highest judicial body is the Constitutional Court of Slovakia (Ústavný súd), which rules on constitutional issues. The 13 members of this court are appointed by the president from a slate of candidates nominated by parliament.
.Slovakia has been a member state of the European Union and NATO since 2004. As a member of the United Nations (since 1993), Slovakia was, on October 10, 2005, elected to a two-year term on the UN Security Council from 2006 to 2007. Slovakia is also a member of WTO, OECD, OSCE, and other international organizations.^ However, on 11 January 2006, the Slovak government passed the National Action Plan for Combating Trafficking in Human Beings for years 2006-2007 as the key referential document with the following aims: .
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^ A year later, the government passed the National Action Plan for Prevention and Elimination of Violence against Women for years 2005-2008 .
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^ For the purposes of the NAP on Trafficking in Human Beings, Slovakia has adopted the definition stated in the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons Especially Women and Children, supplementing the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime: .
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The Constitution of the Slovak Republic was ratified 1 September 1992, and became effective 1 January 1993). It was amended in September 1998 to allow direct election of the president and again in February 2001 due to EU admission requirements. The civil law system is based on Austro-Hungarian codes. .The legal code was modified to comply with the obligations of Organization on Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) and to expunge the Marxist-Leninist legal theory.^ Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe .
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Slovakia accepts the compulsory International Court of Justice jurisdiction with reservations.
The president is the head of state and the formal head of the executive, though with very limited powers. The president is elected by direct, popular vote, under the two round system, for a five-year term.
Following National Council elections, the leader of the majority party or the leader of the majority coalition is usually appointed prime minister by the president. Cabinet appointed by the president on the recommendation of the prime minister has to receive the majority in the parliament. The government coalition as of July 2006 consists of Smer, SNS (known for its open racism and a strongly anti-minority stance)[49] and HZDS.
Main office holders
Office Name Party Since
President Ivan Gašparovič Movement for Democracy 15 June 2004
Prime Minister Robert Fico Direction - Social Democracy 4 July 2006
Deputy prime ministers Dušan Čaplovič
Štefan Harabin
Direction - Social Democracy
HZDS
4 July 2006
4 July 2006

Regions and districts

As for administrative division, Slovakia is subdivided into 8 krajov (singular – kraj, usually translated as "region", but actual meaning is "county"), each of which is named after its principal city. Regions have enjoyed a certain degree of autonomy since 2002. Their self-governing bodies are referred to as Self-governing (or autonomous) Regions (sg. samosprávny kraj, pl. samosprávne kraje) or Upper-Tier Territorial Units (sg. vyšší územný celok, pl. vyššie územné celky, abbr. VÚC).
  1. Bratislava Region (Bratislavský kraj) (capital Bratislava)
  2. Trnava Region (Trnavský kraj) (capital Trnava)
  3. Trenčín Region (Trenčiansky kraj) (capital Trenčín)
  4. Nitra Region (Nitriansky kraj) (capital Nitra)
  5. Žilina Region (Žilinský kraj) (capital Žilina)
  6. Banská Bystrica Region (Banskobystrický kraj) (capital Banská Bystrica)
  7. Prešov Region (Prešovský kraj) (capital Prešov)
  8. Košice Region (Košický kraj) (capital Košice)
(the word kraj can be replaced by samosprávny kraj or by VÚC in each case)
The "kraje" are subdivided into many okresy (sg. okres, usually translated as districts). Slovakia currently has 79 districts.
In terms of economics and unemployment rate, the western regions are richer than eastern regions; however the relative difference is no bigger than in most EU countries having regional differences.

Economy

The National Bank of Slovakia headquarters in Bratislava
The financial district
Slovak 1 € coin
The Slovak economy is considered an advanced economy, with the country dubbed the "Tatra Tiger". Slovakia transformed from a centrally planned economy to a market-driven economy. Major privatizations are nearly complete, the banking sector is almost completely in private hands, and foreign investment has risen.
Slovakia has recently been characterized by sustained high economic growth. In 2006, Slovakia achieved the highest growth of GDP (8.9%) among the members of the OECD. The annual GDP growth in 2007 is estimated at 10.4% with a record level of 14.3% reached in the fourth quarter.[50] According to Eurostat data, Slovak PPS GDP per capita stood at 72 percent of the EU average in 2008.[51]
Unemployment, peaking at 19.2% at the end of 1999, decreased to 7.51% in October 2008 according to the Statistical Office of the Slovak Republic.[52] In addition to economic growth, migration of workers to other EU countries also contributed to this reduction. According to Eurostat, which uses a calculation method different from that of the Statistical Office of the Slovak Republic, the unemployment rate is still the second highest after Spain in the EU-15 group, at 9.9%.[53]
Inflation dropped from an average annual rate of 12.0% in 2000 to just 3.3% in 2002, the election year, but it rose again in 2003–2004 because of rising labor costs and excess taxes. It reached 3.7 % in 2005.
Slovakia adopted the euro currency on 1 January 2009 as the 16th member of the Eurozone. The euro in Slovakia was approved by the European commission on 7 May 2008. The Slovenská koruna was revalued on 28 May 2008 to 30.126 for 1 euro,[54] which was also the exchange rate for the euro.[55]
Slovakia is an attractive country for foreign investors mainly because of its low wages, low tax rates and well educated labour force. In recent years, Slovakia has been pursuing a policy of encouraging foreign investment. FDI inflow grew more than 600% from 2000 and cumulatively reached an all-time high of $17.3 billion USD in 2006, or around $22,000 per capita by the end of 2008.
Despite a sufficient number of researchers[citation needed] and a decent secondary educational system[citation needed], Slovakia, along with other post-communist countries, still faces major challenges in the field of the knowledge economy. The business and public research and development expenditures are well below the EU average. The Programme for International Student Assessment, coordinated by the OECD, currently ranks Slovak secondary education the 30th in the world (placing it just below the United States and just above Spain).[56]
In March 2008, the Ministry of Finance announced that Slovakia's economy is developed enough to stop being an aid receiver from the World Bank. Slovakia became an aid provider at the end of 2008.[57]

Industry

Kia cee'd, made in Žilina
Although Slovakia's GDP comes mainly from the tertiary (services) sector, the country's industry also plays an important role within its economy. The main industry sectors are car manufacturing and electrical engineering. Since 2007, Slovakia has been the world's largest producer of cars per capita,[58] with a total of 571,071 cars manufactured in the country in 2007 alone.[58] There are currently three car manufacturers: Volkswagen in Bratislava, PSA Peugeot Citroen in Trnava and Kia Motors in Žilina.
From electrical engineering companies, Sony has a factory at Nitra for LCD TV manufacturing, Samsung at Galanta for computer monitors and television sets manufacturing.
Bratislava's geographical position in Central Europe has long made Bratislava a crossroads for international trade traffic.[59][60] Various ancient trade routes, such as the Amber Road and the Danube waterway have crossed territory of today Bratislava. Today Bratislava is the road, railway, waterway and airway hub.[61]

Infrastructure

Road

Highways on the New Bridge
The D1, leading to Ruzinov, suburb of Bratislava
Bratislava is a large international motorway junction: The D1 motorway connects Bratislava to Trnava, Nitra, Trenčín, Žilina and beyond, while the D2 motorway, going in the north-south direction, connects it to Prague, Brno and Budapest in the north-south direction. The D4 motorway (an outer bypass), which would ease the pressure on the city highway system, is mostly at the planning stage.
The A6 motorway to Vienna connects Slovakia directly to the Austrian motorway system and was opened on 19 November 2007.[62]
Apollo bridge
Currently, five bridges stand over the Danube (ordered by the flow of the river): Lafranconi Bridge, Nový Most (The New Bridge), Starý most (The Old Bridge), Most Apollo and Prístavný most (The Harbor Bridge).
The city's inner network of roadways is made on the radial-circular shape. Nowadays, Bratislava experiences a sharp increase in the road traffic, increasing pressure on the road network. There are about 200,000 registered cars in Bratislava, (approximately 2 inhabitants per car).[61]
Ružomberok railway station

Air

Bratislava's M. R. Štefánik Airport is the main international airport in Slovakia. It is located 9 kilometres (5.59 mi) north-east of the city centre. It serves civil and governmental, scheduled and unscheduled domestic and international flights. The current runways support the landing of all common types of aircraft currently used. The airport has enjoyed rapidly growing passenger traffic in recent years; it served 279,028 passengers in 2000, 1,937,642 in 2006 and 2,024,142 in 2007.[63] Smaller airports served by passenger airlines include those in Košice and Poprad.

River

The Port of Bratislava is one of the two international river ports in Slovakia. The port connects Bratislava to international boat traffic, especially the interconnection from the North Sea to the Black Sea via the Rhine-Main-Danube Canal. Additionally, tourist lines operate from Bratislava's passenger port, including routes to Devín, Vienna and elsewhere.

Tourism

Slovakia is a good European skiing destination
Slovakia features natural landscapes, mountains, caves, medieval castles and towns, folk architecture, spas and ski resorts. More than 1.6 million people visited Slovakia in 2006, and the most attractive destinations are the capital of Bratislava and the High Tatras.[64] Most visitors come from the Czech Republic (about 26%), Poland (15%) and Germany (11%).[65] Typical souvenirs from Slovakia are dolls dressed in folk costumes, ceramic objects, crystal glass, carved wooden figures, črpáks (wooden pitchers), fujaras (a folk instrument on the UNESCO list) and valaškas (a decorated folk hatchet) and above all products made from corn husks and wire, notably human figures. Souvenirs can be bought in the shops run by the state organization ÚĽUV (Ústredie ľudovej umeleckej výroby – Center of Folk Art Production). Dielo shop chain sells works of Slovak artists and craftsmen. These shops are mostly found in towns and cities. Prices of imported products are generally the same as in the neighboring countries, whereas prices of local products and services, especially food, are usually lower.

Science

Some Slovaks have made notable technical contributions. Jozef Murgaš contributed to development of wireless telegraphy[citation needed]; Ján Bahýľ constructed one of the first motor-driven helicopters[citation needed]; Štefan Banič constructed the first actively used parachute;[66] Aurel Stodola created a bionic arm in 1916 and pioneered steam and gas turbines.[67] More recently, John Dopyera constructed a resonator guitar, an important contribution to the development of acoustic string instruments[citation needed].
American astronaut Eugene Cernan (Čerňan), the last man to visit the Moon, has Slovak heritage. Ivan Bella was the first Slovak citizen in space[citation needed], having participated in a 9-day joint Russian-French-Slovak mission on the space station Mir in 1999[citation needed].
Nobel prize winners Daniel Gajdusek and David Politzer have Slovak ancestors[citation needed].

Culture

See also List of Slovaks
The national theater
The art of Slovakia can be traced back to the Middle Ages, when some of the greatest masterpieces of the country's history were created. Significant figures from this period included the many Masters, among them the Master Paul of Levoča and Master MS. More contemporary art can be seen in the shadows of Koloman Sokol, Albín Brunovský, Martin Benka, Mikuláš Galanda, and Ľudovít Fulla. The most important Slovak composers have been Eugen Suchoň, Ján Cikker, and Alexander Moyzes, in the 21st century Vladimir Godar and Peter Machajdik.
Slovakia is also known for its polyhistors, of whom include Pavol Jozef Šafárik, Matej Bel, Ján Kollár, and its political revolutionaries and reformists, such Milan Rastislav Štefánik and Alexander Dubček.
There were two leading persons who codified the Slovak language. The first was Anton Bernolák whose concept was based on the western Slovak dialect in 1787. It was the codification of the first ever literary language of Slovaks. The second was Ľudovít Štúr, whose formation of the Slovak language took principles from the central Slovak dialect in 1843.
The best known Slovak hero is Juraj Jánošík (the Slovak equivalent of Robin Hood). Famous globetrotter and explorer, count Móric Benyovszky had Slovak ancestors.
In terms of sport, the Slovaks are probably best known (in North America) for their hockey stars, especially Stan Mikita, Peter Šťastný, Peter Bondra, Žigmund Pálffy and Marián Hossa. For a list see List of Slovaks.
For a list of notable Slovak writers and poets, see List of Slovak authors.

Literature

Christian topics include: poem Proglas as a foreword to the four Gospels, partial translations of the Bible into Old Church Slavonic, Zakon sudnyj ljudem, etc.
Medieval literature, in the period from the 11th to the 15th centuries, was written in Latin, Czech and Slovakized Czech. Lyric (prayers, songs and formulas) was still controlled by the Church, while epic was concentrated on legends. Authors from this period include Johannes de Thurocz, author of the Chronica Hungarorum and Maurus, both of them Hungarians.[68] The worldly literature also emerged and chronicles were written in this period.

Cuisine

Bryndzové halušky, Slovak national dish
Pork, beef and poultry are the main meats consumed in Slovakia, with pork being substantially the most popular. Chicken is the most widely eaten poultry, followed by duck, goose, and turkey. A blood sausage called jaternice, made from any and all parts of a butchered pig, also has a following. Game, especially boar, rabbit, and venison, are generally available throughout the year. Lamb and goat is eaten, but is not widely popular.
Wine is enjoyed throughout Slovakia. Slovak wine comes predominantly from the southern areas along the Danube and its tributaries; the northern half of the country is too cold and mountainous to grow grapevines. Traditionally, white wine was more popular than red or rosé (except in some regions), and sweet wine more popular than dry, but in recent years tastes seem to be changing.[69] Beer (mainly of the pilsener style, though dark lagers are also consumed) is also popular throughout the country.

Music

Popular music began to replace folk music beginning in the 1950s, when Slovakia was still part of Czechoslovakia; American jazz, R&B, and rock and roll were popular, alongside waltzes, polkas, and czardas, among other folk forms. By the end of the '50s, radios were common household items, though only state stations were legal. Slovak popular music began as a mix of bossa nova, cool jazz, and rock, with propagandistic lyrics. Dissenters listened to ORF (Austrian Radio), Radio Luxembourg, or Slobodna Europa (Radio Free Europe), which played more rock. Due to Czechoslovak isolation, the domestic market was active and many original bands evolved. Slovakia had a very strong pop culture during 70's and 80's. This movement brought many original bands with their own unique interpretations of modern music. The quality of socialist music was very high. Stars such as Karel Gott, Olympic, Pražský výběr (from Czechia) or Elán, Modus, Tublatanka, Team (from Slovakia) and many others were highly acclaimed and many recorded their LP's in foreign languages.
After the Velvet Revolution and the declaration of the Slovak state, domestic music dramatically diversified as free enterprise encouraged the formation of new bands and the development of new genres of music. Soon, however, major labels brought pop music to Slovakia and drove many of the small companies out of business. The 1990s, American grunge and alternative rock, and Britpop have a wide following, as well as a new found enthusiasm for musicals.

International rankings

See also

Cultural:
Holidays:
Lists:

References

Bibliography

  • Anton Spiesz and Dusan Caplovic: Illustrated Slovak History: A Struggle for Sovereignty in Central Europe ISBN 0-86516-426-6
  • Elena Mannová (ed.): A Concise History of Slovakia ISBN 80-88880-42-4
  • Pavel Dvorak: The Early History of Slovakia in Images ISBN 80-85501-34-1
  • Julius Bartl and Dusan Skvarna: Slovak History: Chronology & Lexicon ISBN 0-86516-444-4
  • Olga Drobna, Eduard Drobny and Magdalena Gocnikova: Slovakia: The Heart of Europe ISBN 0-86516-319-7
  • Karen Henderson: Slovakia: The Escape from Invisibility ISBN 0-415-27436-2
  • Stanislav Kirschbaum: A History of Slovakia : The Struggle for Survival ISBN 0-312-16125-5
  • Alfred Horn: Insight Guide: Czech & Slovak Republics ISBN 0-88729-655-6
  • Rob Humphreys: The Rough Guide to the Czech and Slovak Republics ISBN 1-85828-904-1
  • Michael Jacobs: Blue Guide: Czech and Slovak Republics ISBN 0-393-31932-6
  • Neil Wilson, Richard Nebesky: Lonely Planet World Guide: Czech & Slovak Republics ISBN 1-86450-212-6
  • Eugen Lazistan, Fedor Mikovič, Ivan Kučma and Anna Jurečková: Slovakia: A Photographic Odyssey ISBN 0-86516-517-3
  • Lil Junas: My Slovakia: An American's View ISBN 80-7090-622-7
  • Sharon Fisher: Political Change in Post-Communist Slovakia and Croatia: From Nationalist to Europeanist ISBN 1-4039-7286-9

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d "Slovakia". The World Factbook. CIA. 2007. https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/lo.html. Retrieved April 26, 2008. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Slovakia". International Monetary Fund. http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2009/02/weodata/weorept.aspx?sy=2006&ey=2009&scsm=1&ssd=1&sort=country&ds=.&br=1&c=936&s=NGDPD%2CNGDPDPC%2CPPPGDP%2CPPPPC%2CLP&grp=0&a=&pr.x=41&pr.y=11. Retrieved 2009-10-01. 
  3. ^ "United Nations Statistics Division- Standard Country and Area Codes Classifications (M49)". Unstats.un.org. 2009-04-15. http://unstats.un.org/unsd/methods/m49/m49regin.htm#europe. Retrieved 2009-09-26. 
  4. ^ "World Population Prospects Population Database". Esa.un.org. http://esa.un.org/unpp/definition.html. Retrieved 2009-09-26. 
  5. ^ Mike Dixon-Kennedy (1998). Encyclopedia of Russian & Slavic myth and legend. ABC-CLIO. p. 375. ISBN 1576071308, 9781576071304. http://books.google.com/books?id=eD5AkdM83iIC&pg=PA57&dq=slovakia+was+part+of++hungary&lr=lang_en&as_brr=0&as_pt=ALLTYPES&hl=hu#PPA57,M1. Retrieved 2009.04.23.. 
  6. ^ World Bank Country Classification, 2007
  7. ^ Advanced economies - IMF
  8. ^ "CIA - The World Factbook -- Country Comparison :: National product real growth rate". CIA. 2008. https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/rankorder/2003rank.html. Retrieved 2009-12-01. 
  9. ^ Benda, Kálmán (editor) (1981). Magyarország történeti kronológiája ("The Historical Chronology of Hungary"). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó. p. 44. ISBN 963 05 2661 1. 
  10. ^ . pp. 30–31. 
  11. ^ a b . p. 360. 
  12. ^ Kristó, Gyula (editor) (1994). Korai Magyar Történeti Lexikon (9-14. század) (Encyclopedia of the Early Hungarian History - 9-14th centuries). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó. p. 467. ISBN 963 05 6722 9. 
  13. ^ Poulik, Josef (1978). "The Origins of Christianity in Slavonic Countries North of the Middle Danube Basin". World Archaeology 10 (2): 158–171. 
  14. ^ a b c Čaplovič, Dušan; Viliam Čičaj, Dušan Kováč, Ľubomír Lipták, Ján Lukačka (2000). Dejiny Slovenska. Bratislava: AEP. 
  15. ^ . pp. 167, 566. 
  16. ^ Annales Fuldenses, sive, Annales regni Francorum orientalis ab Einhardo, Ruodolfo, Meginhardo Fuldensibus, Seligenstadi, Fuldae, Mogontiaci conscripti cum continuationibus Ratisbonensi et Altahensibus / post editionem G.H. Pertzii recognovit Friderious Kurze ; Accedunt Annales Fuldenses antiquissimi. Hannover: Imprensis Bibliopolii Hahniani. 1978. http://www.medievalsources.co.uk/fulda.htm. Retrieved 2009-09-26. ."
  17. ^ Tóth, Sándor László (1998). Levediától a Kárpát-medencéig ("From Levedia to the Carpathian Basin"). Szeged: Szegedi Középkorász Műhely. p. 199. ISBN 963 482 175 8. 
  18. ^ . p. 51. 
  19. ^ . pp. 189–211. 
  20. ^ Kristó, Gyula (1996). Magyar honfoglalás - honfoglaló magyarok ("The Hungarians' Occupation of their Country - The Hungarians occupying their Country"). Kossuth Könyvkiadó. pp. 84–85. ISBN 963 09 3836 7. 
  21. ^ Tibenský, Ján et al. (1971). Slovensko: Dejiny. Bratislava: Obzor. 
  22. ^ "Academia Istropolitana". City of Bratislava. February 14, 2005. Archived from the original on 2008-05-07. http://web.archive.org/web/20080507064915/http://www4.bratislava.sk/en/vismo5/dokumenty2.asp?u=700000&id_org=700000&id=2009414&. Retrieved January 5, 2008. 
  23. ^ Divided Memories: The Image of the First World War in the Historical Memory of Slovaks, Slovak Sociological Review , Issue 3 /2003 [1]
  24. ^ J. V. Polisencky, History of Czechoslovakia in Outline (Prague: Bohemia International 1947) at 113–114.
  25. ^ Gerhard L. Weinberg, The Foreign Policy of Hitler's Germany: Starting World War II, 1937-1939 (Chicago, 1980), pp. 470–481.
  26. ^ Leni Yahil, The Holocaust: The Fate of European Jewry, 1932-1945 (Oxford, 1990), pp. 402–403.
  27. ^ For the higher figure, see Milan S. Ďurica, The Slovak Involvement in the Tragedy of the European Jews (Abano Terme: Piovan Editore, 1989), p. 12; for the lower figure, see Gila Fatran, "The Struggle for Jewish Survival During the Holocaust" in The Tragedy of the Jews of Slovakia (Banská Bystrica, 2002), p. 148.
  28. ^ Dawidowicz, Lucy. The War Against the Jews, Bantam, 1986. p. 403
  29. ^ "Slovak bishop praises Nazi regime – BBC News". 2007-01-04. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/6231163.stm. Retrieved 2010-01-04. 
  30. ^ "Antisemitism and Xenophobia Today - Slovakia". http://www.axt.org.uk/antisem/archive/archive1/slovakia/index.htm. 
  31. ^ Management of the Hungarian Issue in Slovak Politics
  32. ^ German minority in Slovakia after 1918 (Nemecká menšina na Slovensku po roku 1918) (in Slovak)
  33. ^ Rock, David; Stefan Wolff (2002). Coming home to Germany? : the integration of ethnic Germans from central and eastern Europe in the Federal Republic. New York; Oxford: Berghahn. 
  34. ^ benes-decrees-implications-eu-enlargement
  35. ^ Dr. Thomas Reimer, Carpathian Germans history
  36. ^ Bratislava at euroWEATHER
  37. ^ Košice at euroWEATHER
  38. ^ Poprad at euroWEATHER
  39. ^ Sliač at euroWEATHER
  40. ^ Roma political and cultural activists estimate that the number of Roma in Slovakia is higher, citing a figure of 350,000 to 400,000 [2]
  41. ^ M. Vašečka, “A Global Report on Roma in Slovakia”, (Institute of Public Affairs: Bratislava, 2002) + Minority Rights Group. See: Equality, Diversity and Enlargement. European Commission: Brussels, 2003, p. 104
  42. ^ "The Holocaust in Bohemia and Moravia". United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, D.C.
  43. ^ "Slovakia". The Virtual Jewish History Tour.
  44. ^ Slovenskej Republiky, Národná Rada (1999). "Zákon 184/1999 Z. z. o používaní jazykov národnostných menšín" (in Slovak). Zbierka zákonov. http://www-8.mensiny.vlada.gov.sk/data/files/418.doc. Retrieved 2009-06-07. 
  45. ^ The Slovaks in America. European Reading Room, Library of Congress.
  46. ^ Lahmeyer, Jan (2004). "Slovakia Statistics". Populstat Website. http://www.populstat.info/Europe/slovakig.htm. Retrieved Dec. 4, 2009. 
  47. ^ Manchin, Robert (2004). "Religion in Europe: Trust Not Filling the Pews". Gallup. http://www.gallup.com/poll/13117/religion-europe-trust-filling-pews.aspx. Retrieved Dec. 4, 2009. 
  48. ^ Vogelsang, Peter; Brian B. M. Larsen (2002). "Deportations". The Danish Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. http://www.holocaust-education.dk/holocaust/deportationer.asp. Retrieved April 26, 2008. 
  49. ^ "Slovak-Hungarian Relations Worsen as Hungary's President Barred". Digitaljournal.com. 2009-08-22. http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/278050. Retrieved 2009-09-26. 
  50. ^ "Gross domestic product in the 4th quarter of 2007". Statistical Office of the Slovak Republic. 3 March 2008. http://portal.statistics.sk/showdoc.do?docid=11460. Retrieved March 4, 2008. 
  51. ^ "GDP per capita in PPS". Eurostat. http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/cache/ITY_PUBLIC/2-25062009-BP/EN/2-25062009-BP-EN.PDF. Retrieved 2009-06-25. 
  52. ^ Slovak unemployment falls to 7.84 pct in Feb from Jan from Thomson Financial News Limited
  53. ^ Eurozone unemployment up to 7.5%
  54. ^ Slovakia revalues currency ahead of euro entry at Guardian.co.uk
  55. ^ 'Slovak euro exchange rate is set' at BBC
  56. ^ Range of rank on the PISA 2006 science scale at OECD
  57. ^ Slovakia Is Sufficiently Developled to Offer Aid Within World Bank at TASR
  58. ^ a b Slovak Car Industry Production Almost Doubled in 2007
  59. ^ "Bratislava in Encyclopædia Britannica". Encyclopædia Britannica. 2007. http://concise.britannica.com/ebc/article-9273337/Bratislava,-Slovakia. Retrieved April 30, 2007. 
  60. ^ "MIPIM 2007 - Other Segments". City of Bratislava. 2007. http://www.visit.bratislava.sk/en/vismo/dokumenty2.asp?id_org=700014&id=1088&p1=1800. Retrieved April 30, 2007. 
  61. ^ a b "Transport and Infrastructure". City of Bratislava. 2007. http://www.visit.bratislava.sk/en/vismo/dokumenty2.asp?id_org=700014&id=1047&p1=1815. Retrieved 12 June 2007. 
  62. ^ "Do Viedne už netreba ísť po okresnej ceste" (in Slovak). Pravda. 2007. http://www.tvojepeniaze.sk/do-viedne-uz-netreba-ist-po-okresnej-ceste-fgy-/sk_pludia.asp?c=A071119_072754_sk_pludia_p01. Retrieved November 19, 2007. 
  63. ^ "Letisko Bratislava - O letisku - Štatistické údaje (Airport Bratislava - About airport - Statistical data)". Letisko M.R. Štefánika - Airport Bratislava. 2008. http://www.airportbratislava.sk/31.html. Retrieved January 19, 2008. 
  64. ^ "The number of tourists in Slovakia is increasing (Turistov na Slovensku pribúda)" (in Slovak). Aktualne.sk. 30 June 2007. http://aktualne.centrum.sk/cestovanie/clanek.phtml?id=240802. Retrieved 30 December 2007. 
  65. ^ "Most tourists in Slovakia still come from the Czech Republic (Na Slovensko chodí stále najviac turistov z ČR)" (in Slovak). Monika Martišková, Joj.sk. 20 September 2007. http://www.joj.sk/ekonomika/20-9-2007/clanok/na-slovensko-chodi-stale-najviac-turistov-z-cr.html. Retrieved 28 November 2007. 
  66. ^ European countries (Slovakia) at europa.eu.int
  67. ^ Fund of A.Stodola
  68. ^ Lawrence Barnett Phillips (1871). The dictionary of biographical reference: containing one hundred thousand names, together with a classed index of the biographical literature of Europe and America. S. Low, Son, & Marston. p. 1020. 
  69. ^ Slovak Cuisine

External links

Government
General information


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Europe : Central Europe : Slovakia
noframe
Location
noframe
Flag
Image:lo-flag.png
Quick Facts
Capital Bratislava
Government parliamentary democracy
Currency Euro
Area 48,845 sq km
Population 5,439,448 (July 2006 est.)
Language Slovak (official), Czech (defacto second language), Hungarian, Ukrainian
Religion Roman Catholic 60.3%, atheist 9.7%, Protestant 8.4%, Orthodox 4.1%, other 17.5%
Electricity 220V/50Hz (European plug type E)
Calling Code +421
Internet TLD .sk
Time Zone UTC +1
.Slovakia [1] (Slovak: Slovensko), formally and still officially the Slovak Republic, is a landlocked country in Central Europe.^ Slovensko is the shortened local name for Slovakia, or the Slovak Republic.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Slovak Republic (short form: Slovakia /sloʊˈvɑːkiə/ ( help · info ) ; Slovak : Slovensko ( help · info ) , long form Slovenská republika ( help · info ) ) is a landlocked country in Central Europe with a population of over five million and an area of about 49,000 square kilometres (19,000 sq mi).
  • Top20Slovakia.com - Your Top20 Guide to Slovakia! 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC top20slovakia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Slovakia's highest legislative body is the 150-seat unicameral National Council of the Slovak Republic ( Národná rada Slovenskej republiky ).
  • Top20Slovakia.com - Your Top20 Guide to Slovakia! 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC top20slovakia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.It is surrounded by Austria to the west, Czech Republic to the northwest, Hungary to the south, Poland to the north and Ukraine to the east.^ Austria 91 km, Czech Republic 197 km, Hungary 676 km, Poland 420 km, Ukraine 90 km .
  • CIA - The World Factbook -- Slovakia 17 September 2009 2:02 UTC www.cia.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Slovakia borders the Czech Republic and Austria to the west, Poland to the north, Ukraine to the east and Hungary to the south.
  • Top20Slovakia.com - Your Top20 Guide to Slovakia! 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC top20slovakia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Austria 91 km.; Czech Republic 215 km.; Hungary 677 km.; Poland 444 km.; Ukraine 97 km.
  • Slovakia (10/09) 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Slovakia 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.virtualsources.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.With numerous medieval Gothic and Baroque towns, nine national parks, plenty of caves, well preserved folk architecture and traditions, a lively and cosmopolitan capital city and probably the highest number of castles and chateaus per capita in the whole world, there's something for every traveler to enjoy in Slovakia.^ Slovakia features natural landscapes, mountains, caves , medieval castles and towns, folk architecture, spas and ski resorts .
  • Top20Slovakia.com - Your Top20 Guide to Slovakia! 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC top20slovakia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The capital city of Slovakia with a population of 441,500 - See Pressburg .
  • Slovakia Jews 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC jewishwebindex.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Today, most of Slovakia 's 4,000 to 6,000 Jews live in the capital of Slovakia , Bratislava and are mostly over 65 years old.
  • Slovakia Jews 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC jewishwebindex.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Map of Slovakia
Map of Slovakia
  • Bratislava - capital and the largest city of Slovakia with a beautifully restored historical centre full of Gothic, Baroque and Renaissance churches, houses and palaces, cobblestone streets, fountains, pleasant cafes and lively and cosmopolitan atmosphere.
  • Banská Bystrica - was one of the most important mining towns of Hungarian part of Austro-Hungarian Empire; beautiful restored square, many churches, castles and museums and memorial of the Slovak National Uprising
  • Žilina - Fourth biggest city with a well preserved historical city centre influenced by German architecture and unique museum of the tinker´s culture located at the Budatín castle.
  • Košice - metropolis of the east, second biggest city of the country with the easternmost situated Gothic Cathedral in the World, the oldest European coat of arms, a great historical city centre with the Cathedral Complex, numerous churches, palaces and interesting museums.
  • Levoca - magnificent medieval pearl of the Spis region surrounded by town walls with a unique renaissance town hall, burger´s houses, numerous churches and St. James Cathedral where the biggest gothic wooden altar of the world is situated
  • Levice - enjoyable castle which is now a museum of the Tekov region
  • Nitra - one of the oldest slovak towns with the castle and well preserved historical centre consisting many baroque palaces and burger´s houses
  • Poprad - gateway to the Tatras National Park
  • Prešov - the best example of renaissance architecture in Slovakia, numerous churches and nearby lying Solivar which is one of the most interesting salt mine museum in Europe
  • Rajecké Teplice - very peaceful spa town surrounded by magnificent Mala Fatra National Park
  • Topoľčany
  • Trenčín - one of the most beautiful Slovak towns with a castle lying above the city overlooking the historical centre and the river Váh
  • Trnava - the oldest Slovak town with the highest number of churches (12) and well preserved baroque architecture
  • Tvrdošín - centre of the Orava region, gateway to Orava's magnificent natural areas
  • Slovenský Raj - Slovakian Paradise National Park
  • Vysoké Tatry - High Tatras
  • Vlkolínec - UNESCO heritage list village
  • Spissky Hrad - one of the biggest castles in Europe, UNESCO listed
  • Nizke Tatry - Low Tatras National Park

Understand

.Slovakia has a temperate climate with sunny summers and cold, cloudy, humid and snowy winters.^ January 14, 2010, 10:14 am Cloudy -1°C Forecast January 14, 2010 day Intermittent clouds -1°C night Intermittent clouds -6°C Weather Forecast Climate in Slovakia .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

.Much of the central and northern part of Slovakia is rugged and mountainous.^ In eastern and parts of central Slovakia, Roman A Slovakian woman embroiders a piece of fabric.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Other components of the Carpathian Mountains are the Little Carpathians and White Carpathians of western Slovakia and the Low Tatras and Slovak Ore Mountains in the north-central area.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Roads in the mountainous northern part of the country are particularly prone to hazardous conditions during winter months.
  • Slovak Republic 19 September 2009 6:18 UTC travel.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Gerlachovský štít at 2,655 m in the High Tatras is the highest point.^ Highest point, Gerlachovsky Štít 2,655 m.
  • Slovakia (10/09) 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Highest point, Gerlachovsky Stit 2,655 m.

^ To the north, close to the Polish border, are the High Tatras which are a popular skiing destination and home to many scenic lakes and valleys as well as the highest point in Slovakia, the Gerlachovský štít at 2,655 metres (8,711 ft), and the country's highly symbolic mountain Kriváň .
  • Top20Slovakia.com - Your Top20 Guide to Slovakia! 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC top20slovakia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The Tatra Mountains in the north, shared with Poland, are interspersed with many scenic lakes and valleys.^ Tatra Mountains in the north are interspersed with many scenic lakes and valleys .
  • CIA - The World Factbook -- Slovakia 17 September 2009 2:02 UTC www.cia.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Other components of the Carpathian Mountains are the Little Carpathians and White Carpathians of western Slovakia and the Low Tatras and Slovak Ore Mountains in the north-central area.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The lowlands are in the south with the lowest point of the Bodrog River being 94 m above sea level.^ Elevation: Lowest point, Bodrok River 94 m.

^ Elevation: Lowest point, Bodrog River 94 m.
  • Slovakia (10/09) 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Bodrok River 94 m highest point: Gerlachovsky Stit 2,655 m .
  • CIA - The World Factbook -- Slovakia 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.umsl.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Slovakia is also a country of massive medieval castles built on the rocks, beautiful detailed ones located on plains (there is about 180 castles and ruins) as well as country of caves.^ Slovakia is an attractive country for foreign investors mainly because of its low wages, low tax rates and well educated labour force .
  • Top20Slovakia.com - Your Top20 Guide to Slovakia! 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC top20slovakia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Slovakia features natural landscapes, mountains, caves , medieval castles and towns, folk architecture, spas and ski resorts .
  • Top20Slovakia.com - Your Top20 Guide to Slovakia! 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC top20slovakia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Located in eastern Slovakia and about 70 km (45 miles) east of Presov ( formerly Eperjes ) - a Jewish cemetery exists in this town.
  • Slovakia Jews 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC jewishwebindex.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Only a small number of over 3000 caves (12) is open for public forever. Mostly traditional karst caves, ice caves, aragonite cave etc. .In 1918 the Slovaks joined the closely related Czechs to form Czechoslovakia.^ Slovak is very closely related to Czech.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In 1918, Slovakia and the regions of Bohemia and Moravia formed a common state, Czechoslovakia , with the borders confirmed by the Treaty of Saint Germain and Treaty of Trianon .
  • Top20Slovakia.com - Your Top20 Guide to Slovakia! 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC top20slovakia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In the former Czechoslovakia, the Slovak anthem was played after the Czech anthem.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Following the chaos of World War II, Czechoslovakia became a communist country within Soviet-ruled Eastern Block.^ Following the chaos of World War II, Czechoslovakia became a Communist nation within Soviet-ruled Eastern Europe.
  • CIA - The World Factbook -- Slovakia 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.umsl.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ At the conclusion of World War II, the reunified Czechoslovakia was considered within the sphere of influence of the Soviet Union.
  • Slovakia (10/09) 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Following the chaos of World War II, Czechoslovakia became a Communist nation within Soviet-dominated Eastern Europe.
  • CIA - The World Factbook -- Slovakia 17 September 2009 2:02 UTC www.cia.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Soviet influence collapsed in 1989 and Czechoslovakia once again became free.^ The end of Communist rule in Czechoslovakia in 1989, during the peaceful Velvet Revolution , was followed once again by the country's dissolution, this time into two successor states .
  • Top20Slovakia.com - Your Top20 Guide to Slovakia! 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC top20slovakia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Czechoslovakia came under the influence of the Soviet Union and its Warsaw Pact after a coup in 1948.
  • Top20Slovakia.com - Your Top20 Guide to Slovakia! 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC top20slovakia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ At the conclusion of WWII, the reunified Czechoslovakia was considered within the sphere of influence of the Soviet Union.

.For many years overshadowed by their north-western Czech neighbors, political representations of Czech and Slovak decided to strike out on their own.^ Slovaks have experienced adversarial relationships with four major ethnic groups as a consequence of wars, conquests, and political configurations: Hungarians, Czechs, Germans, and Russians.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Other components of the Carpathian Mountains are the Little Carpathians and White Carpathians of western Slovakia and the Low Tatras and Slovak Ore Mountains in the north-central area.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The territory of Great Moravia included all of present western and central Slovakia, the Czech Republic, and parts of neighboring Poland, Hungary, and Germany.
  • Slovakia (10/09) 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Slovakia 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.virtualsources.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The Slovaks and the Czechs agreed to separate peacefully on 1 January 1993 and Slovakia became a country in its own right.^ Slovakia became an independent nation on 1 January 1993.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Slovaks and the Czechs agreed to separate peacefully on 1 January 1993.
  • CIA - The World Factbook -- Slovakia 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.umsl.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ January 1993 (Czechoslovakia split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia) .
  • CIA - The World Factbook -- Slovakia 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.umsl.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Historic, political, and geographic factors have caused Slovakia to experience more difficulty in developing a modern market economy than some of its Central European neighbors.^ Slovakia imports more than it exports.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Slovakia has mastered much of the difficult transition from a centrally planned economy to a modern market economy.
  • CIA - The World Factbook -- Slovakia 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.umsl.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ As of June 2009, Slovakia had just over 600 soldiers deployed worldwide, with more than one-third of the total serving in Afghanistan under NATO command.
  • Slovakia (10/09) 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Finally, however, Slovakia joined the European Union and the NATO in 2004, and finally the Euro on January 1st 2009.

Ethnicities

.There are some similarities between the Czech and Slovak cultures.^ Slovak intellectuals cultivated cultural ties with the Czechs, who were themselves ruled by the Austrians.
  • Slovakia (10/09) 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Slovak intellectuals cultivated closer cultural ties with the Czechs, who were themselves ruled by the Austrians.

.However, although the Slovaks may talk and eat like the Czechs, they are not the same.^ It is the same word and meaning in both the Czech and Slovak Republics.
  • Slovakia Jews 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC jewishwebindex.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Czechs and Slovaks divided up military equipment when they split, with Slovakia receiving the smaller share.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.One of the most striking differences is that while Czechs are largely atheists, Slovaks are largely Catholics.^ The Roman Catholic Church of Saint Jacob in Levoča ranks as one of the most significant shrines.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The empire's estimated one million inhabitants included all the western Slavs (peoples who became the Czechs, Moravians, Slovaks, and Poles).
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

This they share with the Poles.
.As a Hungarian territory for approximately thousand years, there is a Hungarian-speaking minority of 9.7%, mostly in southern Slovakia.^ This measure curtailed the use of minority languages in the public sphere and mostly affected the Hungarian minority.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The large Hungarian minority concentrated in the lowlands of southern Slovakia has been more vocal and politically unified since 1989.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Hungarians are the largest cultural minority at 10.7 percent (nearly six hundred thousand) and are concentrated in the southern lowlands near the Hungarian border.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Historic German populations were mostly uprooted and expelled after WWII.
.In the eastern part of the country, there are many Romas/Gypsies and some Rusnacs/Rusins and Ukrainians.^ There also many links to a wealth of information on the area now known as Slovakia including a pictorial tour of the country and a list of towns and Villages in the country.
  • Slovakia Jews 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC jewishwebindex.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Before WW II, there were some 100,000 to 150,000 Jews living in the country, but only 25,000 survived the Holocaust.
  • Slovakia Jews 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC jewishwebindex.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The current ethnic composition of Slovakia is 85.8% Slovak, 9.7% Hungarian, 1.7% Roma/Gypsy, 0.8% Czech, 0.4% Rusyn and 0.2% Ukrainian .
  • Slovakia Jews 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC jewishwebindex.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.There are also some Czechs, Poles and still some Germans living in Slovakia.^ Prior to WW II, there were some 150,000 Jews living in Slovakia .
  • Slovakia Jews 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC jewishwebindex.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Slovakia has a population of almost 5.4 million people living in an area bounded by Poland, Czech Republic, Hungary and Ukraine .
  • Slovakia Jews 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC jewishwebindex.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Besides Magyar (spoken by Hungarians) and Rusyn (spoken by Rusyns in eastern Slovakia), German, English, Russian, French, and Czech are used.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Get in

Slovakia is a member of the Schengen Agreement. .For EU, EEA (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway) or Swiss citizens, an officially approved ID card (or a passport) is sufficient for entry.^ There are no fees for the applicants who are family members of EU or EEA citizen, and who are exercising their right to free movement.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Minimum coverage shall be 30000,-EUR. Family members of EU or EEA nationals (except family members of Slovak citizens) do not need to submit a travel medical insurance.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

.In no case will they need a visa for a stay of any length.^ Which type of visa the foreigner needs, depends on the length and purpose of the stay in Slovakia.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Slovak-Republic.org says: October 20th, 2009 at 6:07 pm Dear sanuja, in that case you need “classical tourist visa” – Schengen Visa C. .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

.Others will generally need a passport for entry.^ General Safety Information Carry a photocopy of your passport and any other travel document, and keep original documents in a secure place, such as the hotel safe.
  • Slovakia Travel Advice and Advisories | Government of Canada 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.voyage.gc.ca [Source type: News]

.There are no border controls between countries that have signed and implemented the treaty - the European Union (except Bulgaria, Cyprus, Ireland, Romania and the United Kingdom), Iceland, Norway and Switzerland.^ There are no borders inside of this area.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Schengen Area The Member States of the European Union (EU) (not including the United Kingdom and Ireland), along with Norway, Iceland, and Switzerland, make up the Schengen Area, which aims for common rules regarding visas, asylum rights, and controls at external borders.
  • Slovakia Travel Advice and Advisories | Government of Canada 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.voyage.gc.ca [Source type: News]

^ Slovakia is part of the Schengen Area – territory of 23 countries of the European Union + 2 associated countries of the European Economic Area, which agreed on the abolition of border controls between themselves.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

.Likewise, a visa granted for any Schengen member is valid in all other countries that have signed and implemented the treaty.^ Visa may be granted with effect for all Schengen Member States.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ With this visa the foreigner is allowed to stay on the territory of Slovakia during the period of its validity and for the first 3 months it allows him/her to travel accross Schengen countries .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Multiple-entry visa entitles you to multiple entries and exits from the Schengen Area within the validity period.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

.But be careful: Not all EU members have signed the Schengen treaty, and not all Schengen members are part of the European Union.^ The first Dzurinda government enabled Slovakia to enter the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), begin accession negotiations with the European Union (EU) and close virtually all chapters of the accession acquis, and make the country a strong candidate for North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) accession.
  • Slovakia (10/09) 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Schengen Area The Member States of the European Union (EU) (not including the United Kingdom and Ireland), along with Norway, Iceland, and Switzerland, make up the Schengen Area, which aims for common rules regarding visas, asylum rights, and controls at external borders.
  • Slovakia Travel Advice and Advisories | Government of Canada 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.voyage.gc.ca [Source type: News]

.Airports in Europe are thus divided into "Schengen" and "non-Schengen" sections, which effectively act like "domestic" and "international" sections elsewhere.^ To be more exact, the original cemetery is divided into 3 sections, but only one section actually resembles a cemetery.
  • Slovakia Jews 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC jewishwebindex.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.If you are flying from outside Europe into one Schengen country and continuing to another, you will clear Immigration and Customs at the first country and then continue to your destination with no further checks.^ For further details about travel into and within Schengen countries, please see our Schengen fact sheet .
  • Slovak Republic 19 September 2009 6:18 UTC travel.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Travel between a Schengen member and a non-Schengen country will result in the normal border checks.^ With this visa the foreigner is allowed to stay on the territory of Slovakia during the period of its validity and for the first 3 months it allows him/her to travel accross Schengen countries .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ That means that if you get Schengen visa, you can travel all around the countries which joined Schengen Area.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ This does not apply to Canadians travelling within the EU or in transit to a non-EU country.
  • Slovakia Travel Advice and Advisories | Government of Canada 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.voyage.gc.ca [Source type: News]

.Note that regardless of whether you travelling within the Schengen area or not, some airlines will still insist on seeing your ID card or passport.^ It is important to get your passport stamped when entering the Schengen Area.
  • Slovakia Travel Advice and Advisories | Government of Canada 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.voyage.gc.ca [Source type: News]

^ Czech republic, you don´t need visa to Slovakia, as both of the countries are in Schengen area.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Verify with your financial institution whether your bank card can be used with ABMs abroad.
  • Slovakia Travel Advice and Advisories | Government of Canada 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.voyage.gc.ca [Source type: News]

.Keep in mind that the counter begins once you enter any country in the Schengen Area and is not reset by leaving a specific Schengen country for another Schengen country, or vice-versa.^ With Schengen visa you can enter any country in Schengen area including Slovakia.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Multiple-entry visa entitles you to multiple entries and exits from the Schengen Area within the validity period.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Slovakia phone code will enable you to make phone calls to Slovakia from another country.
  • Slovakia Country Code 421 Country Code SK 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC countrycode.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.As of January 2010 only the citizens of the following non-EU/EEA/Swiss countries do not need a visa for entry into the Schengen Area; note that they must not stay longer than three months in half a year and must not work while in the EU: Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, Brazil, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Japan, Macedonia*, Malaysia, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Montenegro*, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Saint Kitts and Nevis, San Marino, Serbia*/**, Seychelles, Singapore, South Korea, United States, Uruguay, Vatican City, Venezuela, additionally persons holding British National (Overseas), Hong Kong SAR or Macau SAR passports.^ If you hold a visa for only one entry and you leave the Schengen Area, your visa is no longer valid for the re-entry.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ What do he need to stay longer with his wife and child.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ EEA nationals must meet this obligation within ten working days of the entry.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

Note that
  • while British subjects with the right of abode in the United Kingdom and British Overseas Territories citizens connected to Gibraltar are considered "United Kingdom nationals for European Union purposes" and therefore eligible for unlimited access to the Schengen Area,
  • British Overseas Territories citizens without the right of abode in the United Kingdom and British subjects without the right of abode in the United Kingdom as well as British Overseas citizens and British protected persons in general do require visas.
.However, all British Overseas Territories citizens except those solely connected to the Cyprus Sovereign Base Areas are eligible for British citizenship and thereafter unlimited access to the Schengen Area.^ That means that if you get Schengen visa, you can travel all around the countries which joined Schengen Area.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ If the territorial validity is limited, the visa sticker will say “Platí pre: Slovenská republika” (meaning that the visa is only valid for the territory of the Slovak Republic) or “Schengenské štáty – GR” (meaning that the visa is valid for all Schengen states except Greece).
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Ann says: May 4th, 2009 at 3:36 pm Hi, I am Ukrainian citizen, living in Lithuania all the time (I have a Lithuanian living card and can go to Schengen Area countries – Latvia, Poland).
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

Further note that
(*) Macedonian, Montenegrin and Serbian citizens need a biometric passport to enjoy visa-free travel and
.(**) Serbian citizens with passports issued by the Serbian Coordination Directorate (Serbs residing in Kosovo) still do need a visa.^ August 17th, 2009 at 8:47 pm Hi , I would like to ask if an Indian citizen needs a visa for entering Slovakia just for 3 weeks?
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ I am a Nigerian but I reside in Spain where I have a resident permit and I am in vienna on a visit and I will like to visit slovakia as well and I will like to know if I do need a visa .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Silvia says: September 14th, 2009 at 10:55 pm Hi, does my husband Indian citizen need visa to Slovakia?
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

.If you need a visa, always apply at an embassy beforehand.^ Do I need to apply for a visa to go there?
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ You need to apply for visa at Slovak embassy in Nigeria, please see http://www.slovak-republic.org/visa-embassies/of-slovakia/#nigeria .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Czech republic, you don´t need visa to Slovakia, as both of the countries are in Schengen area.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

.There are zero chances you will get a visa at a Slovak border, no matter how you enter or what your nationality is.^ There are no borders inside of this area.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ UAE.would you advise me how to get the visa to Slovakia i didnt find the requirement or even the embassy website.thanx .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Slovak-Republic.org says: October 15th, 2009 at 4:29 pm Hi Diana, he has the right to get the permanent residency, if you still have yours.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

By train

.The easiest way to get to Bratislava by train from west is via Vienna, in Austria.^ I got work offer in UN Vienna.I have already booked air ticket to Bratislava (whiich is near vienna, Austria).
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ I need visa of slovakia to go vienna via Bratislava??
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

The trip takes 50 - 70 minutes depending on whether the train is an express or a local train (either via Kittsee or Marchegg). .For the north and east of Slovakia, international trains leave from Prague in the Czech Republic to Žilina with some continuing to Košice.^ Czech republic, you don´t need visa to Slovakia, as both of the countries are in Schengen area.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Slovakia has a population of almost 5.4 million people living in an area bounded by Poland, Czech Republic, Hungary and Ukraine .
  • Slovakia Jews 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC jewishwebindex.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ January 1993 (Czechoslovakia split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia) .
  • CIA - The World Factbook -- Slovakia 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.umsl.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Trains also travel to Slovakia from Poland, Hungary and the Ukraine.^ Slovakia has a population of almost 5.4 million people living in an area bounded by Poland, Czech Republic, Hungary and Ukraine .
  • Slovakia Jews 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC jewishwebindex.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ I am holding a shengen visa to Hungary, as the visa is Shengen i can enter to Slovakia am travelling from Abu Dhabi UAE .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ The territory of Great Moravia included all of present western and central Slovakia, the Czech Republic, and parts of neighboring Poland, Hungary, and Germany.
  • Slovakia (10/09) 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Crossing to and from Ukraine is a lengthy process due to bogie changing (different gauge in Ukraine) and security measures. .Direct international trains may be expensive: the best option is to buy a ticket to a station just on the other side of the border, and buy another one for onward travel there.^ One side they say me to leave U.K in 28 days Another side they didnt let me know about any date when i can book my ticket.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ This visa entitles foreigners who are traveling from one non-schengen country to another non-schengen country to pass through the Schengen States .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ National Dialing Prefix (NDD) National Direct Dialing Prefix: The NDD prefix is the access code used to make a call WITHIN that country from one city to another.
  • Slovakia Country Code 421 Country Code SK 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC countrycode.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

You'll avoid the surcharge that way.

By bus

.Among many others, there are regular services from Vienna, Prague and Budapest to Bratislava; and from Uzhhorod, Ukraine to the eastern Slovak town of Michalovce and from Krakow, Poland through Zakopane, Poland to Poprad.^ Rusyns are eastern Slavs who live in Slovakia, Ukraine, and Poland.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ There are three main dialects of Slovak, corresponding to the western, central, and eastern regions.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Slovakia (the Slovak Republic) is a landlocked country with ports on the Danube River at Bratislava and Komarno; it is bordered by the Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine, Hungary, and Austria.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

From Budapest the travel is 4 hours, the bus stop for 5 minutes at Györ and in a small restaurant in the road.

By plane

Bratislava has its own airport. Sky Europe[2] was the main airlines but to illiquidity has suspended all flights for the time being. .RyanAir[3] operates to Stansted, Hahn and some other cities.^ Hamlets are rapidly depopulating in some areas, and many have ceased to exist; empty houses in others are being purchased by city dwellers for use as vacation homes.
  • Culture of Slovakia - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family, social, dress, marriage, men, life, population, religion, rituals 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Full service carriers providing service to Bratislava BTS [4] are Czech Airlines[5] and Lufthansa [6]. Czech Airlines (CSA) provides several flights a day to/from its Prague hub. Czech Airlines connects its Praha hub also with Slovak airports in Kosice, Sliac and Zilina. .One can also fly between Kosice and Vienna (OS) and between Kosice and Bratislava (NE).^ We are on prague on vacations, and we wanted to go on a day trip to Bratislava, do we need a visa for a one day trip???
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ I need visa of slovakia to go vienna via Bratislava??
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

Similarly Lufthansa (LH) provides several flights a day to/from its Munich hub. .There is also nonstop connection to Moscow and several other cities to the east.^ If you can read Slovakian language, great, but if not there are several other choices at the top left of the home page including English.
  • Slovakia Jews 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC jewishwebindex.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The other alternative is Vienna airport Schwechat, which is just about 35 kms from Bratislava. It provides a more convenient way of arriving to Slovakia by the major airlines, but can be more expensive. Buses leave for Bratislava hourly, optionally you can take the airport shuttle.
Poprad - Tatry Airport [7] is also connected with Bratislava, Bologna and Basel thanks to scheduled routes operated by Danube Wings.
You can also fly to Krakow if you want to go to the Tatra Mountains. Buses from Krakow run to several Slovak towns around the Tatra mountains and Orava.
Tatra mountains in northern Slovakia
Tatra mountains in northern Slovakia
.CP[8] offers an exceptionally useful website with integrated timetables for all trains and buses in Slovakia, including all intra-city and inter-city transports.^ The territory of Great Moravia included all of present western and central Slovakia, the Czech Republic, and parts of neighboring Poland, Hungary, and Germany.
  • Slovakia (10/09) 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Trains

.Train is by far the best option to travel across Slovakia, provided you don't have a private vehicle.^ Greeks don’t need visa for travelling to Slovakia.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ For the issues related to Britain – we unfortunately are not allowed to give you any information, as we provide information only related to Slovakia.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Czech republic, you don´t need visa to Slovakia, as both of the countries are in Schengen area.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

.Rail network is extensive, the only exception is central southern Slovakia, where buses are more efficient.^ This is a national visa valid only for the Slovak Republic and it allows the foreigner to pass through the territory of one or more Schengen countries in order to reach the territory of Slovakia.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

Trains are fairly priced, reliable and clean. .Opt for an InterCity service if you want Western-style comfort; IC trains link Bratislava, Žilina, The High Tatras and Košice.^ Bratislava Košice Prešov Nitra Žilina Banská Bystrica Trnava Trenčín .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

These can save you from the crowds: ordinary trains do get crowded, usually on Fridays and Sundays. Watch out for pickpockets at major stations and steer clear of money scams. Also, sporadic robberies occur to sleeping passengers travelling the overnight longliners.

Hitchhiking

Hitchhiking in Slovakia is best done by asking around at gas stations. .It used to be that most people only speak Slovak (and possibly understand other Slavic languages) so it was difficult for foreigners who don't speak Slavic languages.^ Slovaks speak a language closely related to Czech and other West Slav languages.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

However, nowadays most of the young people speak English and almost as many speak German.
.Keep in mind that trains and buses in Slovakia are cheap for Westerners, and (apart from extremely rural areas) it might take a while for someone to pick you up.^ I am from Yemen and I have been accepted to participate in training course takes place in Slovakia Republic between the period (25 -31) October 2009.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ For seting up ltd in Slovakia you need 6666,-EUR. .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

.You can find some offers if you travel from Slovakia and into Slovakia as well on specialized web pages.^ UAE.would you advise me how to get the visa to Slovakia i didnt find the requirement or even the embassy website.thanx .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ However, I would strongly recommend you to contact the Slovak embassy in Washington: http://www.slovak-republic.org/visa-embassies/of-slovakia/#usa before you travel, because some of the documents will be easier to obtain when you are still in USA. .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

The biggest hitchhikers page in Slovakia is stopar.sk [9]. .There you can find offers in English, German, French, Polish, Czech and Hungarian language and it is free.^ If you can read Slovakian language, great, but if not there are several other choices at the top left of the home page including English.
  • Slovakia Jews 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC jewishwebindex.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Main languages: Slovak, Hungarian, Romani, German, Ruthene/Ukrainian .
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

By car

If one intends to drive on the motorways it is required to pay a road toll. This is done by buying a sticker (vignette) which is valid for a week (4,90 €) or longer. The sticker is fastened in the upper right corner on the car's windshield. Getting caught driving on the motorway without a valid vignette means that one has to pay a fine.

Talk

The main languages spoken are Slovak and Czech. .Czech and Slovaks are very proud of their languages, and thus, even in Prague and Bratislava you will not find many signs written in English (outside of the main tourist areas).^ With this LingvoSoft smart dictionary software on your computer, you can easily switch between English and Yiddish, (or any one of many other languages) for prompt translations of 400,000 words both ways!
  • Slovakia Jews 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC jewishwebindex.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ UAE.would you advise me how to get the visa to Slovakia i didnt find the requirement or even the embassy website.thanx .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ The Slovak embassies usually don’t have websites (unfortunately), so it’s no surprise you didn’t find it.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

Some older people are unable to converse in English, so it's good idea to know some Slovak, and [10] Welcome To Slovakia offers some simple phrases. .However, most young people speak at least some English, as it has been taught in most schools since 1990. Czech and Slovak are rather similar, yet distinctive languages (at first, one might think they are dialects of each other).^ Slovaks speak a language closely related to Czech and other West Slav languages.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

^ They initiated and carried out the first awareness-raising campaign against violence, “One-In-Five Women,” in 2001.
  • Slovakia 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.stopvaw.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Since we dont have Slovak or any EU embassy in Liberia ,and also restrict to travel other neighboring country can I apply tourist visa from India.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

Slovak is written using the same Roman characters that English uses, so Western travellers won't have any trouble reading signs and maps.
.As Czechoslovakia was an Austro-Hungarian territory for centuries, there is a significant Hungarian-speaking minority of 9.7%.^ The dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Empire at the close of World War I allowed the Slovaks to join the closely related Czechs to form Czechoslovakia.
  • CIA - The World Factbook -- Slovakia 17 September 2009 2:02 UTC www.cia.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Most of the Hungarians live in southern regions of the country and some of them speak no Slovak.^ Before WW II, there were some 100,000 to 150,000 Jews living in the country, but only 25,000 survived the Holocaust.
  • Slovakia Jews 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC jewishwebindex.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Other Slovaks however normally do not speak or understand the Hungarian language.^ Slovak 85.8%, Hungarian 9.7%, Roma 1.7%, Ruthenian/Ukrainian 1%, other and unspecified 1.8% (2001 census) .
  • CIA - The World Factbook -- Slovakia 17 September 2009 2:02 UTC www.cia.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Slovak (official) 83.9%, Hungarian 10.7%, Roma 1.8%, Ukrainian 1%, other or unspecified 2.6% (2001 census) .
  • CIA - The World Factbook -- Slovakia 17 September 2009 2:02 UTC www.cia.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.While you can make do with English and German in Bratislava, in smaller towns and villages your only chance is trying to approach younger people that speak some English.^ If you hold a visa for only one entry and you leave the Schengen Area, your visa is no longer valid for the re-entry.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

Older residents may know some German. People born between 1935 and 1980 will have learned Russian in school, though few Slovaks will appreciate being spoken to in Russian. Due to the significant tourism growth in the North and the East of Slovakia, English is becoming more widely used and you may try Polish. Other Slavic languages, especially Russian, Serbian, Croatian, and Slovene may also work. In the east Rusyn, a Ukrainian dialect close to Polish is spoken. It is also intelligible with Russian to some extent.
If you speak the international language Esperanto, you can take advantage of the network of Esperanto delegates scattered across Slovakia.

Buy

The official currency of Slovakia is the Euro (€). Until January 1, 2009, the official currency was the koruna ("crown", sk) which can still be found and accepted by the central bank until 2017 at a rate of 30.126sk to €1.
Automatic teller machines (ATM, "bankomat" in Slovak, pl. "bankomaty") are widely available in Slovakia except in smaller villages, and obtaining money there should not present a problem. In most of small villages you can gain money at local postal offices (cashback). Credit cards and debit cards such as Visa, Mastercard, Visa Electron, Cirrus Maestro are widely accepted both in shops and restaurants in bigger cities.

Eat

'Bryndzové halušky' is Slovak national meal made with potato dumplings and special kind of unpasteurized fermented sheep cheese called 'bryndza'. You will get pieces of fried meaty bacon on top of Bryndzové halušky. Apart from being very tasty and delicious, the bryndza is also extremely healthy. Some scientists suppose it can even prevent cancer and treat allergies. Other typical dishes include the sauerkraut soup (kapustnica, typically eaten on Christmas), plum dumplings, chicken or goose stew with dumplings (paprikas) and Segedin goulash.
Some kinds of bread contains caraway. You may or may not like it!
When you want to prepare food by yourself, you may find it interesting buying in villages:
  • pork and chicken are the norm
  • fruits tend to be seasonal
  • vegetables or salads, seasonal
  • bread (in late hours)
There is a myth that fried cheese is often considered as substitute of meat. That is a long way from the truth. For more information visit[11]Slovensko. However, a thick fried slice of cheese served with French fries and a salad is a common Slovak dish[12]. It is served in most restaurants.

Drink

For non-alcoholic drinks try Vinea, a soft drink made from grapes, in both red and white and also non-carbonated. Kofola, a Coke-type soft drink, is also very popular among locals and is available both on tap and bottled. .Slovakia is one of three countries in the world where Coca-cola is not the number one in the market.^ This is a national visa valid only for the Slovak Republic and it allows the foreigner to pass through the territory of one or more Schengen countries in order to reach the territory of Slovakia.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ I would like to share the beauty of your country with them and take a one week holiday in Slovakia.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

Mineral waters are some of the best in the World and can offer positive effects, such as helping get rid of heart burn. There are many types available from shops and supermarkets, for example Budiš, Rajec, Dobrá Voda, Zlatá studňa, Mattoni etc. Others are only available directly from the many spas that naturally spring up all over the place.
For beers, there are a great variety of local brews that are similar in style to Czech beers. Try out the local Zlatý Bažant, Smädný Mních, Topvar and Šariš. Šariš is also available in a dark version that is thicker and heavier on your stomach. If the local tastes do not satisfy, "Western" beers are sold in the bigger restaurants and pubs. Note that quality of the tap beer may vary dramatically between different restaurants and pubs, depending on how well they can prepare the beer (good temperature, not too much carbon dioxide) and how they care about the equipment (clean pipes etc.).
Slovakia has also some great local wines, many similar to Germanic Riesling styles. There are also sweeter wines from the Southern border regions called Tokaj. Slovak wine might not be widely known outside the region but it is certainly worth a try. The best recent wine years in Slovakia were 1997, 2000, 2003 and 2006. The year 2006 is expected to be the best in the last 40 years backwards.
Slovakia produces good spirits. Excellent is the plum brandy (Slivovica), pear brandy (Hruškovica) or liquor Demänovka. But the most popular alcohol is Borovička, a type of gin. In some shops you may try a 25 or 50 ml shot for very little money, so as to avoid buying a big bottle of something of unknown flavour, then decide whether to buy or not to buy ;)
If you are a more adventurous type, you can try some home-made Slivovica that the locals sometimes offer to foreigners. While it is allowed to ferment alcohol at home by law, it is prohibited to distill it. .All home-made liquors are distilled in certified destileries so you don't have to be afraid of any health risks (apart from getting drunk).^ The application should be made personally, so you don’t need to send any forms/copies beforehand – only if you have been asked by them.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

The home-made liquors are very strong (up to 60% alcohol) and usually not very tasty. However, if Slivovica is matured for 12 or more years, it can become a pleasant digestive drink.
  • International Film Festival Artfilm [13] - Yearly in June/July in Trenčianske Teplice and Trenčín.
  • International Film Festival Cinematik [14] - Yearly in early September in Piešťany. Young and relatively small film festival. Accreditation for the whole festival is less than €7.
  • International Film Festival Bratislava [15] - forever in December.
  • Pohoda Music Festival [16] - one of the biggest Slovak music festivals. Yearly in July in Trenčín.

Sleep

There is a wide diversity of rooms available in Slovakia. These range from [17] AquaCity, based in Poprad, through to budget priced rooms [18] in rental chalets.

Learn

There are many ways to find out more about Slovakia. These can range from Government web sites through to Tourist sites.
Video to help you learn about Slovakia can be found at High Tatras TV [19]

Work

There are many ways in which Europeans can research work opportunities in Slovakia. .Most Embassy offices will advise European Citizens and for business investors there are a number of NGO services such as [20]Welcome To Slovakia.^ UAE.would you advise me how to get the visa to Slovakia i didnt find the requirement or even the embassy website.thanx .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

Stay safe

In case of an emergency, call 112, the universal emergency number. For police you can call 158, ambulance 155, and firefighters 150.
.When visiting mountain areas of Slovakia, especially the High Tatra, inform hotel personnel of your trip plans, so that rescuers can be sent to find you if you don't return to the hotel.^ UAE.would you advise me how to get the visa to Slovakia i didnt find the requirement or even the embassy website.thanx .
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Slovak-Republic.org says: May 25th, 2009 at 8:34 pm Hi Deepak, if you have valid Shengen Visa, you don’t need Visa for Slovakia nor for Austria, as all of the countries are in the Shengen Area.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Yes, with a valid Schengen visa you can enter Slovakia through any border crossing – through any airport in the Schengen Area.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

Also, when visiting High Tatras, contact local mountain rescue service of your intent, they may even provide you with a safety guidelines. Beware: the weather in High Tatras is prone to sudden changes, especially during spring and autumn.

Stay healthy

.No vaccination is necessary to visit or stay in Slovakia although if you plan to visit countryside areas, tick vaccination is recommended.^ How can you help us that he can stay for at least 1year and 6months before he can come back to visit us.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Yes, with a valid Schengen visa you can enter Slovakia through any border crossing – through any airport in the Schengen Area.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ They could give you better advice, if there is chance to go to Slovakia within the 28 days you have and manage to stay there too.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

Also Hepatitis "A" and "B" vaccination is advisable as with all European countries.
Tap water is drinkable everywhere - according to one study, water used as tap water in the Bratislava-Vienna region is the cleanest in the world. If you prefer mineral waters, you can choose from multitude of marks, since Slovakia has probably highest numbers of natural mineral water springs per capita. Dark blue or Red label usually indicates carbonated ones ("perlivá"), a green label indicates mildly carbonated ones ("mierne perlivá") and white, pink or baby blue indicates those without carbon dioxide ("neperlivá").

Respect

.Remember that Slovaks are a separate nation that have their independence since 1993 when the Czechoslovakia split into the Slovak Republic and the Czech Republic.^ This is a national visa valid only for the Slovak Republic and it allows the foreigner to pass through the territory of one or more Schengen countries in order to reach the territory of Slovakia.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

As with all "young" nations, some people can be sensitive on nationality issues.
.Like most other countries, politics and history are delicate topics, so tread lightly on those issues, especially World War II, which cost the lives of roughly 15% of Czechoslovakia's population, a rate similar in Poland, the USSR and Yugoslavia.^ Although minorities living in Slovakia alleged discrimination against them during the period of the first Czechoslovak Republic (1918-1938), the most flagrant violation of their rights occurred during and after World War II. In the Holocaust, Nazis and their sympathizers deported and murdered almost all of Slovakia's Jewish population, which had numbered approximately 70,000 in 1939.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

^ The amount of money a foreigner has to prove, must be appropriate to the length and purpose of stay and cost of living in the destination country or countries of the Schengen Area.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ After World War II, Hungarians experienced substantial discrimination at the hands of the Czechoslovak, Slovak and occupation authorities.
  • Minority Rights Group International : Slovakia : Slovakia Overview 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.minorityrights.org [Source type: General]

The 2006 film Hostel is an American work of complete fiction, and there are no documented cases of tourists being kidnapped and tortured in Slovakia. It is considered a safe travel destination for all tourists, as is much of Europe. .It is advisable not to mention it in conversation with Czechs or Slovaks, unless you are sure they are smart enough not to take offence, as the film insulted a lot of Slovaks much like Sacha Baron Cohen's Borat insulted people of Kazakhstan, a lot less, but still enough to be a bad topic.^ Slovak-Republic.org says: October 15th, 2009 at 4:29 pm Hi Diana, he has the right to get the permanent residency, if you still have yours.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ June 22nd, 2009 at 5:42 am Dear admin, All information that you provide is really usefull and thoughtfull of you all,but even though the source that you provide not helpfull a lot,its just like they dont want to give enough info straitup.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Don’t forget to take the documents required for Slovak Visa (read in the article above) and then you just go to the appropriate embassy.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

.If you feel that you must mention it, fun fact: the movie was actually filmed in Czech Republic - a piece of information Slovaks will surely enjoy.^ Slovak-Republic.org says: October 15th, 2009 at 4:29 pm Hi Diana, he has the right to get the permanent residency, if you still have yours.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ Slovak-Republic.org says: November 26th, 2009 at 2:39 pm Dear Derick, yes, you understood it well.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

^ For more than 90 days you should apply for temporary residency and you can do it after arrival in the Slovak Republic.
  • Slovakia & Schengen Visa | Slovak-Republic.org 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.slovak-republic.org [Source type: General]

Similarly, the American movie Eurotrip (2004) might prove a sensitive topic, because it portrayed Slovakia, and its capital Bratislava, as an undeveloped country.
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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Wikipedia-logo.png
Wikipedia has an article on:
See also slovakia, and Slovákia

Contents

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA: /sləʊˈvæ.ki.ə/, /sləʊˈvɑː.ki.ə/
  • (US) IPA: /sloʊˈvɑ.ki.ə/, /sloʊˈvæ.ki.ə/
  •  Audio (US)help, file
  • Rhymes: -ækiə

Proper noun

Singular
Slovakia
Plural
-
Slovakia
.
  1. Country in Central Europe.^ History Culture Geography Practical Information A small, picturesque country - SLOVAKIA - is situated in Central Europe.
    • Slovakia Vacations, Slovakia Tours and Luxury Travel Packages 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.travelwizard.com [Source type: News]

    ^ We offer a wide range of research services in Central and Eastern Europe for companies interested in business over the countries in the region.
    • Market research Slovakia - PMR Research 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC www.research-pmr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Slovakia (Slovak: Slovensko) is a landlocked country in Central Europe with a population of over five million.
    • Slovakia | ajc.com 28 January 2010 0:51 UTC projects.ajc.com [Source type: General]

    Official name: Slovak Republic.

Translations

See also


Finnish

Wikipedia-logo.png
Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:
Slovakia
Wikipedia fi

Proper noun

Slovakia
  1. Slovakia

Declension


Norwegian

Proper noun

Slovakia
  1. Slovakia

Related terms


Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 05, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Slovakia, which are similar to those in the above article.








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