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The NHL's Smythe Division was formed in 1974 as part of the Clarence Campbell Conference. The division existed for 19 seasons until 1993. It was named in honor of Conn Smythe. It is the fore-runner of the NHL's Northwest Division and NHL's Pacific Division.

Contents

Division lineups

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1974–1976

Changes from the 1973–1974 season

  • The Smythe Division is formed as a result of NHL realignment
  • The Vancouver Canucks come from the Eastern Division
  • The Chicago Black Hawks, Minnesota North Stars, and St. Louis Blues come from the Western Division
  • The Kansas City Scouts were added as an expansion team

1976–1978

  • Chicago Black Hawks
  • Colorado Rockies
  • Minnesota North Stars
  • St. Louis Blues
  • Vancouver Canucks

Changes from the 1975–1976 season

  • The Kansas City Scouts move to Denver, Colorado to become the Colorado Rockies.

1978–1979

  • Chicago Black Hawks
  • Colorado Rockies
  • St. Louis Blues
  • Vancouver Canucks

Changes from the 1977–1978 season

  • The Minnesota North Stars merge with the Cleveland Barons. The new franchise continues as the Minnesota North Stars, but assumes the Barons' place in the Adams Division.

1979–1981

Changes from the 1978–1979 season

1981–1982

Changes from the 1980–1981 season

  • The Chicago Black Hawks, St. Louis Blues, and Winnipeg Jets move to the Norris Division
  • The Calgary Flames move in from the Patrick Division
  • The Los Angeles Kings move in from the Norris Division

1982–1991

  • Calgary Flames
  • Edmonton Oilers
  • Los Angeles Kings
  • Vancouver Canucks
  • Winnipeg Jets

Changes from the 1981–1982 season

  • The Colorado Rockies move to the Patrick Division as the New Jersey Devils
  • The Winnipeg Jets move in from the Norris Division

1991–1993

  • Calgary Flames
  • Edmonton Oilers
  • Los Angeles Kings
  • San Jose Sharks
  • Vancouver Canucks
  • Winnipeg Jets

Changes from the 1990–1991 season

  • The San Jose Sharks were added as an expansion team

After the 1992–1993 season

The league was reformatted into two conferences with two divisions each:

Regular season Division Champions

Playoff Division Champions

Stanley Cup Winners produced

Smythe Division Titles Won By Team

Team Number of Championships Won Last Year Won
Edmonton Oilers 6 1987
Chicago Black Hawks 4 1980
Vancouver Canucks 3 1993
Calgary Flames 3 1990
St. Louis Blues 2 1981
Los Angeles Kings 1 1991

See also

References


Simple English

The Smythe Division was one of the playing divisions of the National Hockey League (NHL). It was formed in 1974, and was part of the new Clarence Campbell Conference. A conference is a group of divisions. The division was named after Conn Smythe, owner of the Toronto Maple Leafs from 1927 to 1961. In 1993, the league divisions changed, and most of the Smythe Division became the Pacific Division. The Smythe Division won the Stanley Cup six times.

Contents

Initial teams

The first teams that played in the Smythe Division were:

The Canucks were the only team moved from the old East Division. The Blackhawks, Blues, and North Stars were moved from the old West Division. The Scouts were a new team. The Scouts now play as the New Jersey Devils.[1] The North Stars now play as the Dallas Stars.[2]

Other conferences and divisions

The new Patrick Division was also in the Clarence Campbell Conference. The other conference was the Prince of Wales Conference. The East Division and the new Adams Division were in the Prince of Wales Conference. This was the first year for conferences in the NHL. The old West Division teams were moved into all of the new divisions.[3]

Changes to the Smythe Division

In 1976, the Scouts moved to Denver, Colorado and started playing as the Colorado Rockies.[1] In 1978, the North Stars move to the Adams Division.[2]

In 1979, the World Hockey Association (WHA) went out of business. Four teams from the NWA join the NHL. The Edmonton Oilers[4] and the Winnipeg Jets[5] join the Smythe Division.

In 1981, the NHL changed the conference and division lineups. A number of teams moved to new divisions and conferences. The Blackhawks and the Blues left the Smythe Division for the Norris Division, which was now a part of the Clarence Campbell Conference. The Calgary Flames left the Patrick Division, and the Los Angeles Kings left the Norris Division. Both teams joined the Smythe Division. The Smythe Division now had the following teams:

In 1982 the Rockies moved to the Meadowlands Sports Complex in East Rutherford, New Jersey and started playing as the New Jersey Devils.[6] They also joined the Patrick Division. The Winnipeg Jets moved from the Norris Division to the Smythe Division.[7]

The division lineup stayed the same until 1991, when a new team, the San Jose Sharks was formed in San Jose, California and joined the Smythe Division.[8]

New conferences and divisions

In 1993, the NHL again changed the conferenes and divisions. The Eastern Conference contained the Northeast Division and the Atlantic Division. The Western Conference contained Central Division and the Pacific Division. The Jets were moved to the Central Division. All the other teams in the Smythe Division were moved to the Pacific Division.[9] They were joined by the Anaheim Mighty Ducks, a new team that played in Anaheim, California.[10]

Stanley Cup victories

In 1984, the Oilers were the first team in the Smythe Division to win the Stanley Cup. They also won the Stanley Cup in 1985, 1987, and 1988. In 1989, the Flames won the Stanley Cup. In 1990, the Oilers won the last Stanley Cup for the Smythe division.[3][7]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Kansas City Scouts (1974-1976)". Sports Ecyclopedia. Tank Productions. http://www.sportsecyclopedia.com/nhl/kansascity/kcscouts.html. Retrieved 2010-05-06. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Minnesota North Stars (1967-1993)". Sports Ecyclopedia. Tank Productions. http://www.sportsecyclopedia.com/nhl/minnystars/northstars.html. Retrieved 2010-05-06. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 "NHL.com - History (Final Standings: 1970s)". NHL.com. National Hockey League. http://www.nhl.com/history/fstand70s.html. Retrieved 2010-05-06. 
  4. "Edmonton Oilers (1972-Present)". Sports Ecyclopedia. Tank Productions. http://www.sportsecyclopedia.com/nhl/edmonton/edoilers.html. Retrieved 2010-05-06. 
  5. "Winnipeg Jets (1972-1996)". Sports Ecyclopedia. Tank Productions. http://www.sportsecyclopedia.com/nhl/winnipeg/winjets.html. Retrieved 2010-05-06. 
  6. "Colorado Rockies (1976-1982)". Sports Ecyclopedia. Tank Productions. http://www.sportsecyclopedia.com/nhl/colnj/nhlrockies.html. Retrieved 2010-05-06. 
  7. 7.0 7.1 "NHL.com - History (Final Standings: 1980s)". NHL.com. National Hockey League. http://www.nhl.com/history/fstand80s.html. Retrieved 2010-05-06. 
  8. "San Jose Sharks (1991-Present)". Sports Ecyclopedia. Tank Productions. http://www.sportsecyclopedia.com/nhl/sanjose/sharks.html. Retrieved 2010-05-06. 
  9. "NHL.com - History (Final Standings: 1990s)". NHL.com. National Hockey League. http://www.nhl.com/history/fstand90s.html. Retrieved 2010-05-06. 
  10. "Anaheim Ducks (1993-Present)". Sports Ecyclopedia. Tank Productions. http://www.sportsecyclopedia.com/nhl/anaheim/mducks.html. Retrieved 2010-05-06. 

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