Social psychology: Wikis

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Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Social psychology is the study of the relations between people and groups. Scholars in this interdisciplinary area are typically either psychologists or sociologists, though all social psychologists employ both the individual and the group as their units of analysis.[1]

Despite their similarity, psychological and sociological researchers tend to differ in their goals, approaches, methods, and terminology. They also favor separate academic journals and professional societies. The greatest period of collaboration between sociologists and psychologists was during the years immediately following World War II.[2] Although there has been increasing isolation and specialization in recent years, some degree of overlap and influence remains between the two disciplines.[3]

Contents

Psychology

Main article: Social psychology (psychology)

Most social psychologists are trained within psychology. Their approach to the field focuses on the individual and attempts to explain how the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of individuals are influenced by other people. Psychologically oriented researchers emphasize the immediate social situation and the interaction between person and situation variables. Their research tends to be empirical and quantitative, and it is often centered around laboratory experiments, but there are some computational modeling efforts in the field.[4]

Psychologists who study social psychology are interested in such topics as attitudes, social cognition, cognitive dissonance, social influence, and interpersonal behaviors such as altruism and aggression. Three influential journals for the publication of research in this area are the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, and the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. There are also many other general and specialized social psychology journals.

Sociology

Main article: Social psychology (sociology)

Sociologists' work has a greater focus on the behavior of the group, and thus examines such phenomena as interactions and exchanges at the micro-level, group dynamics and group development, and crowds at the macro-level. Sociologists are interested in the individual and group, but generally within the context of larger social structures and processes, such as social roles, race, class, gender, ethnicity, and socialization. They use a combination of qualitative research designs and quantitative methods, such as procedures for sampling and surveys.

Sociologists in this area are interested in a variety of demographic, social, and cultural phenomena. Some of their major research areas are social inequality, group dynamics, social change, socialization, social identity, and symbolic interactionism. The key sociological journal is Social Psychology Quarterly.

See also

References

  1. ^ Social Psychology, David G. Myers, McGraw Hill, 1993. ISBN:0070442924.
  2. ^ Sewell, W. H. (1989). Some reflections on the golden age of interdisciplinary social psychology. Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 15.
  3. ^ The Psychology of the Social, Uwe Flick, Cambridge University Press, 1998. ISBN:0521588510.
  4. ^ Sun, R. (2008). The Cambridge Handbook of Computational Psychology. Cambridge University Press, New York. 2008
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Study guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiversity

The field of social psychology consists of the overlapping foci of psychology and sociology. Thus, two academic emphases have emerged:

  1. Social psychology with an emphasis on psychology
  2. Social psychology with an emphasis on sociology
    • Needs development...

Psychologists believe that the individual has an impact on society, whereas sociologists believe that society has an impact on the individual.

See also

Social-psychology-division.gif
Sciences humaines.svg Educational level: this is a tertiary (university) resource.

Wikibooks

Up to date as of January 23, 2010
(Redirected to Social Psychology article)

From Wikibooks, the open-content textbooks collection

Drukstation Social psychology.jpg

Contents

Status

  1. Currently, this "book" consists of partly-written and largely separate components, some of which are copied/adapted from Wikipedia articles, etc.
  2. Potential contributors should feel to dive in and start editing, particularly if they are knowledgable.

Front Matter

Wikibook Development Stages
Sparse text 00%.svg Developing text 25%.svg Maturing text 50%.svg Developed text 75%.svg Comprehensive text: 100%.svg

Introduction

01. Introduction
02. Research Methods

Social Self

03. Action and Person
04. The Social Mind
05. Personality, Self, and Identity

Interaction

06. Interaction
07. Types of Social Action
08. Relationships

Collectives

09. Collective and Mind
10. Group Dynamics
11. Crowd Behaviors

Applied Social Psychology

12. Applications to Sociology

Simple English

File:Soc-psych-scope.gif
The scope of social psychological research. Adapted from Cote and Levine (2002).[1]

Social psychology is the study of how people and groups interact. Scholars in this interdisciplinary area are typically either psychologists or sociologists, though all social psychologists employ both the individual and the group as their units of analysis.[2]

Despite their similarity, psychological and sociological researchers tend to differ in their goals, approaches, methods, and terminology. They also favor separate academic journals and professional societies. The greatest period of collaboration between sociologists and psychologists was during the years immediately following World War II.[3] Although there has been increasing isolation and specialization in recent years, some degree of overlap and influence remains between the two disciplines.[4]

References

  1. Cote, J. E. & Levine, C. G. (2002). Identity formation, agency, and culture. Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  2. Social Psychology, David G. Myers, McGraw Hill, 1993. ISBN 0-07-044292-4.
  3. Sewell, W. H. (1989). Some reflections on the golden age of interdisciplinary social psychology. Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 15.
  4. The Psychology of the Social, Uwe Flick, Cambridge University Press, 1998. ISBN 0-521-58851-0.
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