The Full Wiki

Soconusco: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

15°18′56.14″N 92°43′35.01″W / 15.3155944°N 92.7263917°W / 15.3155944; -92.7263917Coordinates: 15°18′56.14″N 92°43′35.01″W / 15.3155944°N 92.7263917°W / 15.3155944; -92.7263917

Soconusco Region, Chiapas State

Soconusco is a region of the Mexican state of Chiapas, located in the extreme south of the state and separated from Guatemala by the Suchiate River. It is a region of rich lowlands and foothills. The economic center is Tapachula. Soconusco consists of 16 municipalities.

The name comes from the Nahuatl word xoconostle, meaning the fruit of the prickly pear cactus. It was, under the Mexica culture, the furthest region of trade, providing jaguar pelts, cacao, and quetzal feathers for the ruling classes in the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan.

The Soconusco region is the main coffee-producing region in Chiapas, with many plantations further inland in the foothills of the Sierra Madre del Sur.

Contents

History

Archaeological evidence shows that somewhere around 1750 B.C. the inhabitants of the region had developed a hierarchical village society, with larger, more elaborate houses presumably reserved for chieftains. A few decades before the Spanish arrived, the Aztecs conquered Soconusco. The region had been relatively isolated before that, protected from the rest of Mesoamerica by the mountains of the continental divide (Sierra Madre del Sur). Inhabitants at the time of the Spanish conquest included the Mames (Maya), with isolated Nahuatl establishments, as at the ruins of Rasario Izapa.

The Spanish under Pedro de Alvarado conquered the region in February 1524, early on Alvarado's expedition to Guatemala. It formed part of the Captaincy General of Guatemala, a dependency of the Viceroyalty of New Spain (Mexico).

When Mexico and Central America obtained independence in 1821, Soconusco, together with the rest of the Captaincy General, joined to the First Mexican Empire under Agustín de Iturbide. When the empire was dissolved in 1823 (Plan de Casa Mata), the Central American entities decided on independence from Mexico and the formation of a Central American Federation. Nevertheless, a series of plebiscites were held to determine whether individual regions favored joining the federation, remaining in Mexico, or separately declaring independence. Chiapas, formerly part of Guatemala, was the only province to favor remaining in Mexico.

However, on July 24, 1824 rebels in Soconusco proclaimed its separation from Chiapas and its annexation to Guatemala and the Central American Federation. On the following August 18, the National Assembly of Central America accepted its annexation, and on May 25, 1825 Central American troops occupied it. But on August 15, 1841, Soconuscan authorities solicited its reincorporation into Mexico. On September 11, 1842, Mexican President Antonio López de Santa Anna proclaimed the "irrevocable union" of Soconusco with Chiapas. The issue between Mexico and Guatemala was not resolved until a boundary treaty was signed on September 27, 1882, when Guatemala gave up its claims to Soconusco.

Other facts

References

  • This article is a free translation of the article Soconusco (Chiapas) in the Spanish Wikipedia (accessed February 22, 2007), with some additional information.

See also

External links

Advertisements

Simple English


Soconusco is a region of the Mexican state of Chiapas. It is in the most southern part of the state. It borders the Republic of Guatemala on the southeast, the regions Costa, Sierra and Fraylesca of Chiapas on the east and north, and the shore of the Pacific Ocean on the southwest. It is a region of rich lowlands and foothills. The economic center of Soconusco is Tapachula.

The name comes from the Nahuatl word xoconostle, meaning the fruit of the prickly pear cactus. It was, under the Mexican culture, the farthest region of trade. The area provided jaguar pelts, cacao, and quetzal feathers for the ruling classes in the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan.

The Soconusco region is the main coffee-producing region in Chiapas. It has many plantations farther inland in the foothills of the Sierra Madre del Sur.


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message