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Sodium salicylate: Wikis

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Sodium salicylate
SodiumSalicylate.png
IUPAC name
Other names Salsonin, Monosodium salicylate, Sodium o-hydroxybenzoate, Sodium 2-hydroxybenzoate, Salicylic acid sodium salt, Monosodium 2-hydroxybenzoate, Diuratin, ...
Identifiers
CAS number 54-21-7 Yes check.svgY
PubChem 5900
EC number 200-198-0
KEGG D00566
RTECS number VO5075000
SMILES
InChI
Properties
Molecular formula C7H5NaO3
Molar mass 160.11 g/mol
Appearance White crystals
Melting point

200 °C

Solubility in water ~ 660 g/l at 20 °C
Hazards
R-phrases R22, R36/37/38
S-phrases S24/25, S26, S36/37/39
NFPA 704
NFPA 704.svg
1
1
0
 
Autoignition
temperature
> 250 °C
 Yes check.svgY (what is this?)  (verify)
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
Infobox references

Sodium salicylate is a sodium salt of salicylic acid. It can be prepared from sodium phenolate and carbon dioxide under higher temperature and pressure. Historically, it has been synthesized from methyl salicylate (found in wintergreen plants or the bark of sweet birch tree) by reacting it with an excess of sodium hydroxide and heating it under reflux.[1]

It is used in medicine as an analgesic and antipyretic. Sodium salicylate also acts as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and induces apoptosis in cancer cells [1][2][3] and also necrosis [4]. It is also a potential replacement for aspirin for people sensitive to it.

Sodium Salicylate is of the salicylate family and this compound is known to trigger Reye's Syndrome in children and adults, usually following a viral infection such as influenza or chicken pox. Products containing such salicylates should not be given to children under the age of 19.

External links

  1. ^ Lehman, J.W., Operational Organich Chemistry, 4th ed., New Jersey, Prentice Hall, 2009
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