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Solar eclipse of April 17, 1912: Wikis

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Solar eclipse of April 17, 1912
SE1912Apr17H.png
Map
Type of eclipse
Nature Hybrid
Gamma 0.528
Magnitude 1.0003
Maximum eclipse
Duration 0m 2s
Coordinates 38.4N 11.3W
Max. width of band 1 km
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse 11:34:22
References
Saros 137 (30 of 70)
Catalog # (SE5000) 9308

A total solar eclipse occurred on April 17, 1912. It is a hybrid event, starting and ending as an annular eclipse, with only a small portion of totality. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partially obscuring Earth's view of the Sun. A total solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is larger than the Sun, blocking all direct sunlight, turning day into darkness. Totality occurs in a narrow path across the surface of the Earth, while a partial solar eclipse will be visible over a region thousands of miles wide.

Totality was visible over the sea between Spain and France, with annularity continued northeast across Europe and Asia.

This eclipse occurred two days after the RMS Titanic sank in the northwestern Atlantic ocean under the darkness of new moon.[1]

Contents

Observations

Solar eclipse 1912Apr17 Flammarion.jpg
The Observatory of Paris had the Globule balloon aloft for the 17 April 1912 hybrid eclipse, reported by Camille Flammarion.[2]
Solar eclipse 1912Apr17-LePetitJournal.png
The Le Petit Journal cover, on 1912 April 21, shows eclipse watchers in 1912 along with the solar eclipse of May 22, 1724, the previous total solar eclipse visible from Paris, France[3]

Related eclipses

Solar eclipses 1910-1913

This set of solar eclipses repeat approximately every 177 days and 4 hours at alternating nodes of the moon's orbit.

Solar eclipse series sets from 1910-1913
Ascending node   Descending node
117 May 9, 1910
SE1910May09T.png
Total
122 November 2, 1910
SE1910Nov02P.png
Partial
127 April 28, 1911
SE1911Apr28T.png
Total
132 October 22, 1911
SE1911Oct22A.png
Annular
137 April 17, 1912
SE1912Apr17H.png
Hybrid
142 October 10, 1912
SE1912Oct10T.png
Total
147 April 6, 1913
SE1913Apr06P.png
Partial
152 September 30, 1913
SE1913Sep30P.png
Partial

Notes

  1. ^ www.astronomeer.com: The "Titanic" eclipse of 17 April 1912 The last annular eclipse in the Netherlands was 17 April 1912, just two days after the Titanic hit an iceberg and sank.
  2. ^ [1] Societe Astronomique, pp. 234-248, 1912 - By Camille Flammarion (Translation from French by LRM) p. 240 "A balloon dirigible, having on board Admiral Fournier and Colonel Bourgeois permitted good perception of the moon's shadow at a speed of 800 m/sec ... From a captive balloon near Saint-Nom-de-la-Breteche, Captain Dupic made analogous observations which confirmed those made from the dirigible."
  3. ^ [2] 17th April 1912: Eclipse fever grips Europe

References


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