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Solar eclipse of July 11, 2010
SE2010Jul11T.png
Map
Type of eclipse
Nature Total
Gamma -0.6788
Magnitude 1.058
Maximum eclipse
Duration 5m 20s
Coordinates 19.7S 121.9W
Max. width of band 259 km
Times (UTC)
(P1) Partial begin 17:09:41
(U1) Total begin 18:15:15
Greatest eclipse 19:34:38
(U4) Total end 20:51:42
(P4) Partial end 21:57:16
References
Saros 146 (27 of 76)
Catalog # (SE5000) 9530

A total solar eclipse will occur on July 11, 2010.[1] A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partially obscuring Earth's view of the Sun. A total solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is larger than the Sun, blocking all direct sunlight, turning day into darkness. Totality occurs in a narrow path across the surface of the Earth, while a partial solar eclipse will be visible over a region thousands of miles wide.

The eclipse will be visible over much of the southern Pacific Ocean, touching several small islands including Tuamotu in French Polynesia and Easter Island, as well as the southern tips of Argentina and Chile in South America.[2]

Contents

Images

SE2010Jul11T.gif
Animated map of the eclipse

Related eclipses

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Solar eclipses 2008-2011

This set of solar eclipses repeat approximately every 177 days and 4 hours at alternating nodes of the moon's orbit.

Solar eclipse series sets from 2008–2011
Ascending node   Descending node
Saros Map Saros Map
121
Solar eclipse 2008Feb07-New Zealand-partial-Greg Hewgill.png
Partial from New Zealand
2008 February 7
SE2008Feb07A.png
Annular
126
NovosibirskTotalEclipsePhoto-cropped.jpg
Total from Russia
2008 August 1
SE2008Aug01T.png
Total
131
Solar eclipse 2009Jan26-Jefferson Teng.png
Bandar Lampung, Indonesia
2009 January 26
SE2009Jan26A.png
Annular
136
Solar eclipse 22 July 2009 taken by Lutfar Rahman Nirjhar from Bangladesh.jpg
Total from Bangladesh
2009 July 22
SE2009Jul22T.png
Total
141
(closeup) Solar annular eclipse of January 15, 2010 in Bangui, Central African Republic.JPG
Bangui, Central African Republic
2010 January 15
SE2010Jan15A.png
Annular
146 2010 July 11
SE2010Jul11T.png
Total
151 2011 January 4
SE2011Jan04P.png
Partial (north)
156 2011 July 1
SE2011Jul01P.png
Partial (south)
Partial solar eclipses on June 1, 2011 and November 25, 2011 occur on the next lunar year eclipse set.

Metonic series

The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days).

This series has 21 eclipse events between July 11, 1953 and July 11, 2029.

July 10-11 April 29-30 February 15-16 December 4 September 21-23
116 118 120 122 124
SE1953Jul11P.png
July 11, 1953
SE1957Apr30A.png
April 30, 1957
SE1961Feb15T.png
February 15, 1961
SE1964Dec04P.png
December 4, 1964
SE1968Sep22T.png
September 22, 1968
126 128 130 132 134
SE1972Jul10T.png
July 10, 1972
SE1976Apr29A.png
April 29, 1976
SE1980Feb16T.png
February 16, 1980
SE1983Dec04A.png
December 4, 1983
SE1987Sep23A.png
September 23, 1987
136 138 140 142 144
SE1991Jul11T.png
July 11, 1991
SE1995Apr29A.png
April 29, 1995
SE1999Feb16A.png
February 16, 1999
SE2002Dec04T.png
December 4, 2002
SE2006Sep22A.png
September 22, 2006
146 148 150 152 154
SE2010Jul11T.png
July 11, 2010
SE2014Apr29A.png
April 29, 2014
SE2018Feb15P.png
February 15, 2018
SE2021Dec04T.png
December 4, 2021
SE2025Sep21P.png
September 21, 2025
156
SE2029Jul11P.png
July 11, 2029

Notes

  1. ^ Total Solar Eclipse of 2010 July 11, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse/SEmono/TSE2010/TSE2010.html  
  2. ^ Bond, Peter (1999). DK Guide to Space: A Photographic Journey Through the Universe. New York, New York: DK Publishing, Inc.

References


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