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Solidus (punctuation): Wikis

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Punctuation

apostrophe ( ' )
brackets ( ( ) ), ( [ ] ), ( { } ), ( ⟨ ⟩)
colon ( : )
comma ( , )
dashes ( , , , )
ellipses ( , ... )
exclamation mark ( ! )
full stop/period ( . )
guillemets ( « » )
hyphen ( -, )
question mark ( ? )
quotation marks ( ‘ ’, “ ” )
semicolon ( ; )
slash/stroke ( / )
solidus ( )
Word dividers
spaces ( ) () () ( ) () () ()
interpunct ( · )
General typography
ampersand ( & )
at sign ( @ )
asterisk ( * )
backslash ( \ )
bullet ( )
caret ( ^ )
copyright symbol ( © )
currency generic: ( ¤ )
specific: ฿, ¢, $, , ƒ, , , , £, , ¥, , ,
daggers ( , )
degree ( ° )
ditto mark ( )
inverted exclamation mark ( ¡ )
inverted question mark ( ¿ )
number sign/pound/hash ( # )
numero sign ( )
ordinal indicator (º, ª)
percent (etc.) ( %, ‰, )
pilcrow ( )
prime ( )
registered trademark ( ® )
section sign ( § )
service mark ( )
sound recording copyright symbol ( )
tilde ( ~ )
trademark ( )
underscore/understrike ( _ )
vertical/broken bar, pipe ( |, ¦ )
Uncommon typography
asterism ( )
falsum ( )
index/fist ( )
therefore sign ( )
because sign ( )
interrobang ( )
irony mark/percontation point ( ؟ )
lozenge ( )
reference mark ( )
tie ( )

The solidus ( ⁄ ) is a punctuation mark that is not found on standard keyboards. It may also be called a shilling mark or in-line fraction bar or fraction slash or a forward-slash. Its Unicode encoding is U+2044.

The solidus is similar to another punctuation mark, the slash, which is found on standard keyboards; the slash is closer to being vertical than the solidus. These are two distinct symbols that have entirely different uses. However, many people do not distinguish between them, and when there is no alternative it is acceptable to use the slash in place of the solidus.

Typographers should note that both the ISO and Unicode designate the solidus as FRACTION SLASH U+2044[1] and the slash as SOLIDUS U+002F.[2] This contradicts long-established English typesetting terminology. [3]

Contents

History

The names solidus and shilling mark have the same background. In the Commonwealth of Nations, before decimalisation, currency sums in pounds, shillings, and pence were abbreviated using the '£' symbol, the 's.' symbol, and the 'd.' symbol (collectively £sd) referring to the libra, the solidus, and the denarius. The 's.' was at one stage written using a long s, that was further abbreviated to the symbol, and suppression of the 'd.'; thus '2 pounds, 10 shillings, and 6 pence', often written as £2 ⁄ 10 ⁄ 6 (as an alternative to '£2 10s. 6d.'), and '6 shillings' would often be written as 6 ⁄ -. This usage caused the names solidus (given the abbreviation's historical root) and shilling mark to be used as names for this character.

Usage

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Currency

The shilling mark is used to denote shillings, see the History section above.

Mathematics

The solidus is used in the display of ratios and fractions as in constructing a fraction using superscript and subscript as in 123456, or on the same level as in 2350.

The solidus is found in many legacy Apple Macintosh character sets. It can be typed on a Macintosh computer (with US keyboard layout) by pressing Option+Shift+1. Systems capable of fine typography display this result as a true fraction with small numbers.

Unicode also distinguishes the DIVISION SLASH U+2215 ( ∕ ) which may be more oblique than the normal solidus character.

Music

Some songs on later records by the French progressive rock band Magma utilize the solidus (or a solidus like character) in their titles. Examples of these songs include 'Ẁohldünt M⁄ëm Dëẁëlëss', 'Tü Lü Lï ⁄ë Üi Dü Wiï', and 'Rind⁄ë'

References

  1. ^ Unicode General Punctuation code chart, p. 185.
  2. ^ Unicode ASCII Punctuation code chart, p. 4.
  3. ^ The Elements of Typographic Style, by Robert Bringhurst.

External links


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