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For current information on this topic, see South Africa national football team 2010.
South Africa
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Bafana Bafana
(The Boys)
Association South African
Football Association
Confederation CAF (Africa)
Head coach Carlos Alberto Parreira
Captain Aaron Mokoena
Most caps Aaron Mokoena (99)
Top scorer Benni McCarthy (35)
Home stadium Soccer City
FIFA code RSA
FIFA ranking 81
Highest FIFA ranking 16 (August 1996)
Lowest FIFA ranking 109 (August 1993)
Elo ranking 68
Highest Elo ranking 21 (9) (September 1996 (October 1955)[1])
Lowest Elo ranking 94 (May 2006)
Home colours
Away colours
First international
Argentina Argentina 0 - 1 South Africa United Kingdom
(Buenos Aires, Argentina; 9 July 1906)
Biggest win
Australia Australia 0 - 8 South Africa South Africa
(Adelaide, Australia; September 17, 1955)
Biggest defeat
Australia Australia 5 - 1 South Africa South Africa
(Newcastle, Australia; 7 June 1947)
Mexico Mexico 4 - 0 South Africa South Africa
(Los Angeles, USA; 6 October 1993)
United States USA 4 - 0 South Africa South Africa
(Washington, USA; 3 June 2000)
Nigeria Nigeria 4 - 0 South Africa South Africa
(Monastir, Tunisia; 31 January 2004)
World Cup
Appearances 3 (First in 1998)
Best result Round 1, 1998 and 2002
African Nations Cup
Appearances 7 (First in 1996)
Best result Winners, 1996
Confederations Cup
Appearances 2 (First in 1997)
Best result 4th place, 2009

The South Africa national football team or Bafana Bafana is the national team of South Africa and is controlled by the South African Football Association. They returned to the world stage in 1992, after years of being banned from FIFA. They will be hosting the 19th FIFA World Cup in June 2010 after they hosted the Confederation Cup in 2009. South Africa will be the first African nation to host FIFA World Cup. They have come a long way from being banned by FIFA in 1962 to being the host of a World Cup.

Contents

History

Football first arrived in South Africa through colonialism in the late nineteenth century, as the game was popular among British soldiers.[2] From the earliest days of the sport in South Africa until the end of apartheid, organised football was affected by the country's system of racial segregation. The all-white Football Association of South Africa (FASA), was formed in 1892, while the South African Indian Football Association (SAIFA), the South African Bantu Football Association (SABFA) and the South African Coloured Football Association (SACFA) were founded in 1903, 1933 and 1936 respectively.

South Africa was one of four African nations to attend FIFA's 1953 congress, at which the four demanded, and won, representation on the FIFA executive committee.[3] Thus the four nations (South Africa, Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan) founded the Confederation of African Football in 1956,[3] and the South African representative, Fred Fell, sat at the first meeting as a founding member. It soon became clear however that South Africa's constitution prohibited racially mixed teams from competitive sport and so they could only send either an all-black side or an all-white side to the planned 1957 African Cup of Nations. This was unacceptable to the other members of the Confederation and South Africa were disqualified from the competition, however some sources say that they withdrew voluntarily.

At the second CAF conference in 1958 South Africa were formally expelled from CAF. The all-white (FASA) were admitted to FIFA in the same year, but in August 1960 it was given an ultimatum of one year to fall in line with the non-discriminatory regulations of FIFA. On 26 September 1961 at the annual FIFA conference, the South African association was formally suspended from FIFA. Sir Stanley Rous, president of The Football Association of England and a champion of South Africa's FIFA membership, was elected FIFA President a few days later. Rous was adamant that sport, and FIFA in particular, should not embroil itself in political matters and against fierce opposition he continued to resist attempts to expel South Africa from FIFA. The suspension was lifted in January 1963 after a visit to South Africa by Rous in order to investigate the state of football in the country.

Rous declared that if the suspension were not lifted, football there would be discontinued, possibly to the point of no recovery. The next annual conference of FIFA in October 1964 took place in Tokyo and was attended by a larger contingent of representatives from African and Asian associations and here the suspension of South Africa's membership was re-imposed. In 1976, after the Soweto uprising, they were formally expelled from FIFA.

In 1991, with the apartheid system was beginning to be demolished, a new multi-racial South African Football Association was formed, and admitted to FIFA. On 7 July 1992, the South African national team played their first game in two decades, beating Cameroon 1-0. South Africa made the 1998 and 2002 World Cups, but failed to qualify past the group stage both times. They hosted (and won) the 1996 African Nations Cup and will host the 2010 World Cup, the first African nation to do so.

South Africa failed to impress local supporters by not scoring a single goal in the African Nations Cup of 2006. In light of these poor performances it was decided that the hiring of a more experienced manager was essential. Rumours began to fly, prior to the 2006, that England coach Sven-Göran Eriksson was to be the man for the job, with SAFA apparently offering him R30 million to take Bafana-Bafana to glory in 2010. However this has since been denied. More recently the former Brazil coach Carlos Alberto Parreira has accepted the job. He signed a R100 million contract covering four years. His term as manager started 1 January 2007 targeting 2010 FIFA World Cup but he resigned in April 2008 due to family reasons.

Joel Santana signed to coach until 2010.[4]

South Africa hosted the 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup, a year before their World Cup, and finished in fourth place, coming through the group stages with a win over New Zealand and a draw with Iraq, despite a loss to Spain. They then lost in the semi-finals to Brazil, conceding a late free-kick after holding the South Americans at bay for most of the match. In the 3rd-place play-off, they lost to Spain after extra time, despite leading 1-0 at one stage. For many commentators, the ability of Bafana Bafana to stand up to the South American and European champions showed just how far the team had come.

Honours

1996
2002, 2007, 2008

International record

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FIFA World Cup Profile

Although South Africa has made two appearances in the World Cup, they have not made it past the first round. Their first appearance was in France 1998, six years after they had been readmitted to the global football family. Despite a 3-0 drubbing to France in their opening game, they went on to draw against Denmark and Saudi Arabia. Korea/Japan 2002 was expected to be an opportunity for Bafana Bafana to step up to the next level but, unfortunately, they flattered to deceive, crashing out after the group stage despite beating Slovenia 1-0 for their first-ever FIFA World Cup win.

FIFA World Cup

Year Result Pos P W D L GS GA
Uruguay 1930
Did Not Enter
Italy 1934
France 1938
Brazil 1950
Switzerland 1954
Sweden 1958
Chile 1962
England 1966
Banned from FIFA
Mexico 1970
West Germany 1974
Argentina 1978
Spain 1982
Mexico 1986
Italy 1990
United States 1994
Did Not Qualify
France 1998
Round 1 24 3 0 2 1 3 6
South Korea Japan 2002
Round 1 17 3 1 1 1 5 5
Germany 2006
Did Not Qualify
South Africa 2010
Qualified (as hosts) - 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brazil 2014 To be determined
Total 3/19 6 1 3 2 8 11

FIFA Confederations Cup

Year Result P W D L GS GA
Saudi Arabia 1992 Banned from FIFA
Saudi Arabia 1995 Did Not Qualify
Saudi Arabia 1997 Round 1 3 0 1 2 5 7
Mexico 1999 Did Not Qualify
South Korea Japan 2001
France 2003
Germany 2005
South Africa 2009 4th place 5 1 1 3 4 5
Brazil 2013 To be determined
Total 2/8 7 1 2 4 7 9

African Cup of Nations

Year Result P W D L GS GA
Sudan 1957 Disqualified because of apartheid
Egypt 1959 Banned from CAF
Ethiopia 1962
Ghana 1963
Tunisia 1965
Ethiopia 1968
Sudan 1970
Cameroon 1972
Egypt 1974
Ethiopia 1976
Ghana 1978
Nigeria 1980
Libya 1982
Côte d'Ivoire 1984
Egypt 1986
Morocco 1988
Algeria 1990
Senegal 1992
Tunisia 1994 Did Not Qualify
South Africa 1996 Champions 6 5 0 1 11 2
Burkina Faso 1998 Runners up 6 3 2 1 9 6
Ghana Nigeria 2000 Third place 6 3 2 1 8 6
Mali 2002 Quarter-finals 4 1 2 1 3 3
Tunisia 2004 Round 1 3 1 1 1 3 5
Egypt 2006 Round 1 3 0 0 3 0 5
Ghana 2008 Round 1 3 0 2 1 3 5
Angola 2010 Did Not Qualify
Gabon Equatorial Guinea 2012 To be determined
Libya 2014 To be determined
Total 7/27 31 13 9 9 37 32

Former coaches

Most capped players

Player South Africa career Caps (Goals)
Aaron Mokoena 1999-present 99 (2)
Benni McCarthy 1997-present 83 (35)
Mark Fish 1993-2006 78 (16)
Shaun Bartlett 1995-2005 74 (28)
John Moshoeu 1993-2004 73 (8)
Delron Buckley 1998-present 73 (10)
Siyabonga Nomvethe 1999-present 73 (15)
Lucas Radebe 1992-2003 70 (2)
Andre Arendse 1995-2004 67 (0)
Sibusiso Zuma 1998-2008 67 (13)

Top goalscorers

Player South Africa career Goals (Caps)
Benni McCarthy 1997-present 35 (83)
Shaun Bartlett 1995-2005 28 (74)
Phil Masinga 1992-2001 18 (58)
Siyabonga Nomvethe 1999-present 15 (72)
Sibusiso Zuma 1998-2008 13 (67)
Delron Buckley 1998-present 10 (72)
Doctor Khumalo 1992-2001 9 (50)
Teko Modise 2007-present 9 (40)
Helman Mkhalele 1994-2001 8 (66)

Current squad

A 29 man squad was chosen to go to a training camp in Brazil. The squad is made up mostly of loacal, PSL based players. The team will play friendlies against Brazilian clubs, as well as a friendly against Paraguay on 31 March 2010.

No. Pos. Player DoB (Age) Caps Goals Club
GK Emile Baron 17 June 1979 (1979-06-17) (age 30) 0 South Africa Supersport United
GK Itumeleng Khune 20 June 1987 (1987-06-20) (age 22) 20 0 South Africa Kaizer Chiefs
GK Moeneeb Josephs 19 May 1980 (1980-05-19) (age 29) 14 0 South Africa Orlando Pirates
DF Matthew Booth 14 March 1977 (1977-03-14) (age 33) 26 1 South Africa Mamelodi Sundowns
DF Siboniso Gaxa 6 April 1984 (1984-04-06) (age 25) 32 0 South Africa Mamelodi Sundowns
DF Siyanda Xulu 30 December 1991 (1991-12-30) (age 18) 0 South Africa Mamelodi Sundowns
DF Innocent Mdledle 12 November 1985 (1985-11-12) (age 24) 5 0 South Africa Mamelodi Sundowns
DF Bongani Khumalo 6 January 1987 (1987-01-06) (age 23) 5 0 South Africa Supersport United
DF Thabo Nthethe 4 October 1984 (1984-10-04) (age 25) South Africa Bloemfontein Celtic
DF Siyabonga Sangweni 29 September 1981 (1981-09-29) (age 28) 2 0 South Africa Golden Arrows
DF Lucas Thwala 19 October 1981 (1981-10-19) (age 28) 16 1 South Africa Orlando Pirates
MF Franklin Cale 10 May 1983 (1983-05-10) (age 26) 2 0 South Africa Supersport United
MF Surprise Moriri 20 March 1980 (1980-03-20) (age 29) 25 3 South Africa Mamelodi Sundowns
MF Lebohang Mokoena 29 September 1986 (1986-09-29) (age 23) 5 0 South Africa Mamelodi Sundowns
MF Daylon Claasen 28 January 1990 (1990-01-28) (age 20) Netherlands Ajax
MF Lance Davids 11 April 1985 (1985-04-11) (age 24) 16 0 South Africa Ajax Cape Town
MF Andile Jali 10 April 1990 (1990-04-10) (age 19) South Africa Orlando Pirates
MF Teko Modise 22 December 1982 (1982-12-22) (age 27) 43 9 South Africa Orlando Pirates
MF Thanduyise Khuboni 23 May 1986 (1986-05-23) (age 23) South Africa Golden Arrows
MF Daine Klate 25 February 1985 (1985-02-25) (age 25) 5 1 South Africa Supersport United
MF Reneilwe Letsholonyane 9 June 1982 (1982-06-09) (age 27) 1 South Africa Kaizer Chiefs
MF Siphiwe Tshabalala 25 September 1984 (1984-09-25) (age 25) 39 4 South Africa Kaizer Chiefs
MF Tlou Segolela 3 January 1988 (1988-01-03) (age 22) South Africa Bloemfontein Celtic
FW Kermit Erasmus 8 July 1990 (1990-07-08) (age 19) Netherlands SBV Excelsior
FW Thulasizwe Mbuyane 13 August 1983 (1983-08-13) (age 26) 2 0 South Africa Orlando Pirates
FW Gert Schalkwyk 9 April 1982 (1982-04-09) (age 27) 4 0 South Africa Orlando Pirates
FW Katlego Mphela 29 November 1984 (1984-11-29) (age 25) 24 8 South Africa Mamelodi Sundowns
FW Richard Henyekane 28 September 1983 (1983-09-28) (age 26) 2 0 South Africa Golden Arrows
FW Thulani Serero 11 April 1990 (1990-04-11) (age 19) 1 0 South Africa Ajax Cape Town

Recent and future matches

Last five matches

Date Team Score Type Venue
3 March 2010  Namibia 1-1 Draw Friendly South Africa Moses Mabhida Stadium, Durban, South Africa
27 January 2010  Zimbabwe 3-0 Win Friendly South Africa Moses Mabhida Stadium, Durban, South Africa
17 November 2009  Jamaica 0-0 Draw Friendly South Africa Free State Stadium, Bloemfontein, South Africa
14 November 2009  Japan 0-0 Draw Friendly South Africa Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabeth, South Africa
13 October 2009  Iceland 1-0 Loss Friendly Iceland Reykjavik, Iceland

Upcoming

Date Team Score Type Venue
31 March 2010  Paraguay Friendly Paraguay Estadio Defensores del Chaco, Asuncion, Paraguay
5 June 2010  Denmark Friendly South Africa Soccer City, Johannesburg, South Africa
11 June 2010  Mexico Group Match South Africa Soccer City, Johannesburg, South Africa
16 June 2010  Uruguay Group Match South Africa Loftus Versfeld Stadium, Pretoria, South Africa
22 June 2010  France Group Match South Africa Free State Stadium, Bloemfontein, South Africa

References

  1. ^ The Elo ratings website lists 21 as the highest reached position, though after 23 (too few?) matches between 1947 and 1955, almost all with Australia and New Zealand, it had reached 9th place.
  2. ^ Goldblatt, David (2007). The Ball is Round: A Global History of Football. London: Penguin. pp. 90–91. ISBN 978-0-14-101582-8. 
  3. ^ a b Goldblatt, The Ball is Round: A Global History of Football, p493
  4. ^ http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/soccer/wires/04/22/2080.ap.la.spt.soc.south.africa.santana.0414/index.html

External links


Simple English

South Africa
Association South African Football Association
Confederation CAF
Coach Joel Santana
Most caps Aaron Mokoena (81)
Top scorer Benni McCarthy (31)
World Cup
Appearances 3
First Apps 1998
Best result Round 1 (1998, 2002)

South Africa national football team is the national football team of South Africa.

Most appearances

PosPlayerAppsGoalsCareer
1Aaron Mokoena8111999-present
2Benni McCarthy75311997-present
3Shaun Bartlett74291995-2005
4John Moshoeu7381993-2004
5Siyabonga Nomvethe72151999-present
5Delron Buckley72101998-present
7Lucas Radebe7021992-2003
8Sibusiso Zuma67131998-present
8Andre Arendse6701995-2004
10Helman Mkhalele6681994-2001

Top scorers

PosPlayerGoalsAppsCareer
1Benni McCarthy31751997-present
2Shaun Bartlett29741995-2005
3Phil Masinga18581992-2001
4Siyabonga Nomvethe15721999-present
5Sibusiso Zuma13671998-present
6Delron Buckley10721998-present
7Doctor Khumalo9501992-2001
8John Moshoeu8731993-2004
8Helman Mkhalele8661994-2001
8Teko Modise8292007-present

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