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South Amboy, New Jersey
—  City (New Jersey)  —
South Amboy highlighted in Middlesex County
Coordinates: 40°28′53″N 74°17′6″W / 40.48139°N 74.285°W / 40.48139; -74.285Coordinates: 40°28′53″N 74°17′6″W / 40.48139°N 74.285°W / 40.48139; -74.285
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Middlesex
Incorporated 21 February 1798
Government
 - Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 - Mayor John T. O'Leary
Area
 - Total 2.7 sq mi (7.0 km2)
 - Land 1.6 sq mi (4.0 km2)
 - Water 1.2 sq mi (3.0 km2)
Elevation 125 ft (38 m)
Population (2006)[1]
 - Total 7,865
 - Density 5,102.1/sq mi (1,969.9/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08878-08879
Area code(s) 732
FIPS code 34-68550[2][3]
GNIS feature ID 0880702[4]
Website http://www.southamboynj.gov/

South Amboy is a city in Middlesex County, New Jersey, on the Raritan Bay. As of the United States 2000 Census, the city population was 7,913.

South Amboy, and Perth Amboy across the Raritan River, are collectively referred to as The Amboys. Signage for Exit 11 on the New Jersey Turnpike refers to "The Amboys" as a destination.

South Amboy has passed through three of the five types of New Jersey municipalities. It was first mentioned on 28 May 1782 in Freeholder minutes as being formed from Perth Amboy Township, and then formally incorporated as a township on 21 February 1798. Over the next 90 years, portions broke away to form Monroe Township (9 April 1838), Madison Township (2 March 1869; later Old Bridge Township) and Sayreville Township (6 April 1876; later Borough of Sayreville). As of 25 February 1888, South Amboy borough was formed, replacing South Amboy Township. On 11 April 1908, South Amboy was incorporated as a city, replacing South Amboy borough, with a referendum held on 21 July 1908.[5]

Contents

Geography

South Amboy is located at 40°28′53″N 74°17′06″W / 40.481455°N 74.285125°W / 40.481455; -74.285125 (40.481455, -74.285125).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.7 square miles (7.0 km2), of which, 1.5 square miles (4.0 km2) of it is land and 1.1 square miles (3.0 km2) of it (42.59%) is water.

Area code 732 and 848 are used in South Amboy. It used to carry Area code 908, until 908 was allocated to Union, Hunterdon, and Warren Counties and South Amboy was designated as 732. Rahway and Clark in Union County still use the 732 area code.

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1930 8,476
1940 7,802 −8.0%
1950 8,422 7.9%
1960 8,422 0%
1970 9,338 10.9%
1980 8,322 −10.9%
1990 7,863 −5.5%
2000 7,913 0.6%
Est. 2006 7,865 [1] −0.6%
Population 1930 - 1990.[7]

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 7,913 people, 2,967 households, and 2,041 families residing in the city. The population density was 5,102.1 people per square mile (1,971.1/km2). There were 3,110 housing units at an average density of 2,005.3/sq mi (774.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.22% White, 0.86% African American, 0.19% Native American, 1.38% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.71% from other races, and 1.62% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.75% of the population.

There were 2,967 households out of which 32.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.8% were married couples living together, 14.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.2% were non-families. 25.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.22.

In the city the population was spread out with 24.3% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 32.9% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 13.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 95.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $50,529, and the median income for a family was $62,029. Males had a median income of $42,365 versus $29,737 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,598. About 6.7% of families and 7.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.6% of those under age 18 and 6.0% of those age 65 or over.

Government

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Local government

South Amboy is governed under the Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council) system of municipal government.[8]

The current mayor of South Amboy is John T. O'Leary.[9] The current members of the City Council are Council President Fred Henry, Joseph E. Connors, Russ Stillwagon and Mark Noble.[10]

Federal, state and county representation

South Amboy is in the Sixth Congressional District and is part of New Jersey's 19th Legislative District.[11]

New Jersey's Sixth Congressional District, covering portions of Middlesex County and Monmouth County, is represented by Frank Pallone (D). New Jersey is represented in the Senate by Frank Lautenberg (D, Cliffside Park) and Bob Menendez (D, Hoboken).

For the 2008-2009 Legislative Session, the 19th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph Vitale (D, Woodbridge) and in the Assembly by Joseph Vas (D, Perth Amboy) and John S. Wisniewski (D, Sayreville).[12] The Governor of New Jersey is Jon Corzine (D, Hoboken).[13]

Middlesex County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis. As of 2008, Middlesex County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director David B. Crabiel (Milltown), Freeholder Deputy Director Stephen J. "Pete" Dalina (Fords), Camille Fernicola (Piscataway), H. James Polos (Highland Park), Ronald Rios (Carteret), Christopher D. Rafano (South River) and Blanquita B. Valenti (New Brunswick).[14]

Education

The South Amboy Public Schools serve students in prekindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2005-06 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[15]) are South Amboy Elementary School (PreK-6, 581 students) and South Amboy Middle High School (7-12, 445 students).

South Amboy also has one Catholic elementary school, Sacred Heart School.

Cardinal McCarrick High School is a coeducational Catholic secondary school that serves nearly 500 students in ninth through twelfth grade.

Transportation

The South Amboy station provides service on the New Jersey Transit North Jersey Coast Line, with most trains heading to Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan and some heading to Hoboken Terminal. NJ Transit bus service is available on the 815 and 817 routes.[16]

Noted residents

References

  1. ^ a b Census data for South Amboy city, United States Census Bureau. Accessed 25 July 2007.
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31.  
  3. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed 14 July 2008.
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. http://geonames.usgs.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31.  
  5. ^ "The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968", John P. Snyder, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 173.
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2005-05-03. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved 2008-01-31.  
  7. ^ Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed 1 March 2007.
  8. ^ 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 87.
  9. ^ Mayor, City of South Amboy. Accessed 31 March 2008.
  10. ^ Council, City of South Amboy. Accessed 31 March 2008.
  11. ^ 2008 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, New Jersey League of Women Voters, p. 64. Accessed 30 August 2006.
  12. ^ Legislative Roster: 2008-2009 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed June 6, 2008.
  13. ^ "About the Governor". New Jersey. http://www.nj.gov/governor/about/. Retrieved 6 June 2008.  
  14. ^ Elected County Officials, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed February 21, 2007.
  15. ^ Data for the South Amboy Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed 31 March 2008.
  16. ^ Middlesex County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit. Accessed 19 June 2007.
  17. ^ Cardinal McCarrick High School Hall of Fame, accessed 29 April 2007. "He resides in South Ambov with his wife, Fran."
  18. ^ DEREK JACOBI HAS ROLE IN BRITISH THRILLER 'DEAD AGAIN', Lexington Herald-Leader, 22 November 1991, accessed 29 April 2007. "Evigan was born in South Amboy, N.J."
  19. ^ Congressional biography of Harold Giles Hoffman, accessed 29 April 2007.
  20. ^ Reusse, Patrick. "McKeon, young Marlins work magic.", Star Tribune, 18 October 2003. Accessed 31 March 2008. "Tom Kelly and Jack McKeon share the hometown of South Amboy, N.J."
  21. ^ Raley, Dan. "Déjà two: A half-century apart, twins light up Seattle courts", Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 8 March 2003. Accessed 19 June 2007. "The O'Briens grew up in South Amboy, N.J., mainly as baseball players. They were cut from the basketball team as sophomores and juniors at St. Mary's High School for one reason: Too darn short.... The O'Briens never made it to the NBA. They were drafted by the old Milwaukee Hawks, but turned to pro baseball instead, as infielders and part-time pitchers. Each accepted a $25,000 signing bonus from the Pittsburgh Pirates and went straight to the majors, becoming the first set of twins to play together on the same big-league team, if not appear together on the same trading card."
  22. ^ Thomas Joseph Scully profile, United States Congress. Accessed 25 July 2007.
  23. ^ http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/more/04/22/dpshow.bios/index.html

External links


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