The Full Wiki

South Carolina House of Representatives: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The South Carolina House of Representatives is the lower house of the South Carolina General Assembly, the upper house being the South Carolina Senate. It consists of 124 Representatives elected to two year terms at the same time US Congressional elections. Unlike many legislatures, seating on the floor is not divided by party, but is arranged by county delegation.

Contents

Composition

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Republican Democratic Vacant
End of previous legislature 73 51 124 0
Begin 71 52 123 1
April 28, 2009 72 124 0
September 15, 2009[1] 71 123 1
November 3, 2009[2] 72 124 0
Latest voting share 58.1% 41.9%

Due to death of Olin R. Phillips (D), District 30 on December 27, 2008 one seat was vacant at the begin. Steve Moss (R) was elected in a Special Election on April 28, 2009.[3]

Advertisements

Leadership

Robert W. "Bobby" Harrell, Jr. (R-114) is the Speaker of the House. Harry F. Cato (R-17) is the Speaker Pro Tempore. Kenneth A. "Kenny" Bingham (R-89) is the Majority Leader, and Harry L. Ott, Jr. (D-93) is the Minority Leader.[1]

Past Compositions

Year Democratic
Party
Republican
Party
Independent
/ Other
Majority
1865 0 0 124 124
1868 14 110 0 96
1870 0 100 24(a) 76
1872 22 102 0 80
1874 0 91 33(b) 58
1876 64 60 0 4
1878 121 3 0 118
1880 120 4 0 116
1902-
1962
124 0 0 124
1964 123 1 0 122
1966 107 17 0 90
1968 119 5 0 114
1970 115 9 0 109
1972 107 17 0 90
1974 110 14 0 96
1976 114 10 0 104
1978 111 13 0 98
1980 110 14 0 96
1982 108 16 0 92
1984 102 22 0 80
1986 98 26 0 72
1988 94 30 0 64
1990 89 35 0 54
1992 84 40 0 44
1994 72 52 0 20
1996 54 70 0 16
1998 58 66 0 12
2000 55 69 0 14
2002 51 73 0 22
2004 50 74 0 24
2006 51 73 0 22
2008 52 72 0 21

(a) 21 were members of the Union Reform Party of South Carolina and the other 3 were Independents from Anderson. Two of the Union Reform members from Chesterfield were later replaced by Republicans from a resolution passed in the House.
(b) All 33 were members of the Conservative Party of South Carolina.

References

  • Kalk, Bruce H. (2001). The origins of the southern strategy: two-party competition in South Carolina, 1950-1972. Lexington Books. ISBN 0-7391-0242-7.  
  • Reynolds, John S. (1969). Reconstruction in South Carolina. Negro University Press. ISBN 0-8371-1638-4.  
  • The Post and Courier
  • The State
  1. ^ Republican Carl Gullick (D-48) resigned after moving to Kentucky
  2. ^ Republican Ralph Norman wins special election for the 48th district seat
  3. ^ Adam Fogle: Moss wins special election, The Palmetto Scoop, April 28, 2009

External links


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message