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Speeches by Martin Luther King: Wikis

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Martin Luther King, Jr. at the podium on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in August 1963.

The sermons and speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr. comprise an extensive catalog of American writing and oratory — some of which are internationally well-known, while others remain unheralded, and some await re-discovery.

Martin Luther King, Jr. was a prominent African American clergyman, a civil rights leader, and a Nobel laureate.[1]

King himself observed, "In the quiet recesses of my heart, I am fundamentally a clergyman, a Baptist preacher."[2]

Contents

Speechwriter and orator

The famous "I Have a Dream" address was delivered from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Less well-remembered are the early sermons of that young, twenty-five year-old pastor who first began preaching at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama in 1954.[3] As a political leader in the Civil Rights Movement and as a modest preacher in a Baptist church, King evolved and matured across the span of a life cut short. The range of his rhetoric was anticipated and encompassed within "The Three Dimensions of a Complete Life," which he preached as his trial sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in 1954 and every year thereafter for the rest of his life.[4]

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Sermons

How long? Not long, because the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.
They told us we wouldn't get here, used by then US-presidential candidate Barack Obama in his victory-speech (first prelimonary) in Ohio 2008.
His final speech, and his final words in public: I'm not worried about anything. I'm not fearing any man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.

Speeches

Notes

Speech given at McFarlin Auditorium, Southern Methodist University March 17, 1966, drawn from same sources as April 10, 1957 St. Louis, Mo. speech. Speech can be heard at: <http://www.smu.edu/audio/mlk-at-smu-17march1966.wma>

References

External links


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