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A sponsor, in the United States Congress, is a senator or representative who introduces a bill or amendment and is its chief advocate.[1] Committees are occasionally identified as sponsors of legislation as well. A sponsor is also sometimes called a "primary sponsor."[2]

It should not be assumed that a bill's sponsor actually drafted it. The bill may have been drafted by a staff member, by an interest group, or by others.[3] In the Senate, multiple sponsorship of a bill is permitted.[2]

In contrast to a sponsor, a "cosponsor" is a senator or representative who adds his or her name as a supporter to the sponsor's bill. An "initial cosponsor" or "original cosponsor" is a senator or representative who was listed as a cosponsor at the time of a bill's introduction, rather than added as a cosponsor later on.[2][4] A cosponsor added later is known as an "additional cosponsor".[2] Some bills have hundreds of cosponsors.[5]

External links

Footnotes

  1. ^ C-Span Glossary, "Sponsor"
  2. ^ a b c d Johnson, Charles. "How Our Laws Are Made", United States House of Representatives (2003).
  3. ^ Sagers. Chris. “A Statute by Any Other (Non-Acronomial) Name Might Smell Less Like S.P.AM., or, The Congress of the United States Grows Increasingly D.U.M.B.”, Cleveland-Marshall Legal Studies Paper No. 08-151 (2008): "bills may also be drafted by constituents or interest groups, by state legislatures ('memorializing' Congress to enact federal laws), by administrative agencies, or by commissions appointed by the president or a cabinet member."
  4. ^ C-Span Glossary, "Cosponsor".
  5. ^ Fitch, Brad. “Media Relations Handbook for Agencies, Associations, Nonprofits, And Congress” (TheCapitol.Net 2004): “Some bills have hundreds of cosponsors, since members can easily add their support to any bill introduced and sometimes do it verbally without notifying staff.”
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