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St Kilda Football Club
St Kilda Football Club's 2006 logo
Names
Full name St Kilda Football Club
Nickname(s) Saints
Motto Fortius Quo Fidelius

(fortitude along with fidelity)
(strength through loyalty)

Season 2009
Position (after finals) 2nd
Home & away season 2009 Minor Premiers
Pre-season cup 12th
Top goalkicker 2009 - Nick Riewoldt
Best & Fairest 2009 - Nick Riewoldt
Club Details
Founded 1873
Colours      Red,      White and      Black
Competition Australian Football League
Coach Ross Lyon
Captain(s) Nick Riewoldt
Ground(s) Docklands Stadium, Melbourne - Home Ground
Moorabbin Oval, Melbourne - Training Ground, Administration & Social Club
Other information
Official website www.saints.com.au

The St Kilda Football Club, nicknamed the Saints, is an Australian Rules Football club based in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The club plays in the Australian Football League, the premier Australian Rules league.

The club was established in 1873 and its name originates from the Melbourne suburb of St Kilda.

The club was a foundation team of the Victorian Football Association (VFA) in 1877 and later, in 1897, became a foundation team in the Victorian Football League (VFL), which was renamed the Australian Football League (AFL) prior to the start of the 1990 premiership season.[1]

St Kilda's only premiership win to date was in the 1966 VFL season. The club's most recent minor premiership was in the 2009 AFL season[2] and its most recent pre-season cup win was the 2008 NAB Cup.[3]

Contents

History

1873: Establishment

The St Kilda Football Club was formed on 2 April 1873,[4] containing many elements of the previous South Yarra Football Club which had disbanded a year earlier. Soon after a decision was made to amalgamate St Kilda FC with nearby Prahran Football Club. St Kilda retained their colours, name and ground, as well as picking up a number of Prahran players.[5] St Kilda competed as a senior club in the VFA from 1877 to 1879, 1881–1882 and 1886-1896 before moving into the breakaway competition - The Victorian Football League - from 1897 onwards.[6]

1897: Joining the VFL

St Kilda were one of the eight clubs that took part in the inaugural VFL season in 1897. They made their debut in an away game against Collingwood on 8 May 1897, which they lost 2.4. (16) to 5.11. (41).

The club's first home ground was the Junction Oval in the suburb of St Kilda and the club's first home game was against Fitzroy. The score was St Kllda 3.8. (26) to 10.6. (66).

St Kilda's early years in the VFL were not very successful and, in 1899, they had the lowest score ever recorded in a VFL/AFL match, one point against Geelong (who scored 162).[7]

1907: First finals series

Six successive wins at the start of the 1907 season saw the club make the finals for the first time, qualifying third with nine wins and eight losses.

St Kilda was beaten by Carlton FC in the club's first VFL final by 56 points. The club again qualified third in 1908 and was once again eliminated by Carlton in the semi finals by 58 points.

1913: First grand final

The 1913 season saw major improvement in which the team qualified fourth, but were eventually beaten in the 1913 grand final by Fitzroy. At the time a challenge system was in place, which allowed the team that qualified in first position as minor premiers to challenge any team that won through to be the top ranked team in the finals series if it was not the minor premiers. St Kilda won its semi-final against South Melbourne and then defeated Fitzroy two weeks later 10-10 (70) to 6-9 (45) in what was a match between the two teams that won the semi-finals. Fitzroy as minor premiers were allowed to challenge St Kilda - the number 1 ranked team in the finals series at that point - and the two teams played again the following week in the grand final which Fitzroy won 7-14 (56) to 5-13 (43).

Due to World War I the St Kilda Football Club was in recess in 1916 and 1917 but resumed in 1918 and fared well, making the finals in fourth position but were eliminated by Collingwood in a semi final by nine points, 58 to 49.

Results declined in the early 1920s, with the club finishing last in 1920 and 1924. The following years saw St Kilda establish itself as a more consistently competitive club. Colin Watson won the Brownlow Medal in 1925 and St Kilda made the finals in 1929 and were eliminated once again by Carlton 12.9 (81) to 11.7 (73) in the semi-finals.

1930s and 1940s

The mid 1930s saw the club consistently vying for finals berths, finally making it in 1939 by qualifying fourth after a record run of eight consecutive victories and an overall record of 13 wins and 5 losses.[5] The team had its first finals win since 1913 over Richmond but were eliminated in the 1939 finals series by Collingwood in the Preliminary Final.

The club won three of the first four games early in the 1940 season and were on top of the ladder after Round 4 before finishing second last. Although there were some prominent players like Harold Bray, Keith Drinan, Peter Bennett and later Neil Roberts, St Kilda were rarely competitive in the 1940s. In the 1950 season St Kilda won the first five games before fading to finish with eight wins and a draw in ninth place. In 1955, after one of the club's worst seasons, Alan Killigrew was appointed coach. His first action was one of the largest clean-outs of players in the history of any VFL club. It is believed that only 17 players from 1955 played for St Kilda again in 1956, with 11 new players appearing in the club's opening match of 1956.

1957 - 1959: Consecutive Brownlow medalists

Under Alan Killigrew as coach the team became more competitive with St Kilda having three consecutive Brownlow Medal winners; Brian Gleeson in 1957, Neil Roberts in 1958 and Verdun Howell in 1959. In 1958 St Kilda won the Consolation Night Series Competition, a competition that was played between clubs that failed to qualify for the finals series (for teams that finished between 5th and 12th) - St Kilda defeated Carlton 16.13 (109) to 15.11 (101) in the final.

In 1961, after finishing sixth in 1960, Allan Jeans was appointed coach. St Kilda qualified for the final four for the first time since 1939, qualifying third with eleven wins and seven losses. However, with fullback Verdun Howell unfit, the club lost to Footscray in the first semi-final. The club finished ninth in 1962 with nine wins and nine losses.

St Kilda had a convincing sequence of six consecutive wins ever over the last six rounds of the 1963 season to qualify in fourth position with 13 wins (52 premiership points), two premiership points behind minor premiers Hawthorn. The club lost to Melbourne in the semifinals. In 1964 St Kilda was defeated in the final of the Consolation Night Series competition by Footscray, 11.12 (78) to 11.7 (73).

1965: First minor premiership

After the 1964 season, the club moved to Moorabbin Oval in the south-eastern suburbs of Melbourne in an effort to attract the population of a rapidly growing region. The move was a success and St Kilda finished a game clear on top of the ladder with 14 wins and 4 losses, qualifying for the finals series in first position and winning the minor premiership for the first time in 1965. Ian Stewart won the 1965 Brownlow Medal. St Kilda defeated Collingwood in the second semi-final to progress into the 1965 VFL Grand Final when they were defeated by Essendon 14-21 (105) to 9-16 (70).

1966: First premiership

1966 saw St Kilda again qualify with 14 wins and 4 losses, qualifying for the finals in second place. Ian Stewart won his second consecutive Brownlow Medal. St Kilda were defeated by Collignwood in the second semi-final and then defeated Essendon in the preliminary final. St Kilda went on to defeat Collingwood in the 1966 grand final 10-14 (74) to 10-13 (73), winning the premiership for the first time.

In 1967 Ross Smith won the Brownlow Medal. The 1968 season saw St Kilda qualify fourth with 14 wins, 5 losses and a draw. St Kilda was eliminated by Geelong in the first semi-final.

1970 - 1973: Consecutive finals series

A seventh place home and away season finish in 1969 was followed by another finals appearance in 1970, when St Kilda qualified in third place with 14 wins and 8 losses. St Kilda defeated South Melbourne in the first semifinal and went on to be eliminated by eventual premiers Carlton in the preliminary final.

St Kilda qualified for the finals series in second place in 1971 at the end of the home and away season with 16 wins. St Kilda was defeated by Hawthorn by two points in the second semifinal, defeated Richmond in the preliminary final and was defeated in the 1971 VFL Grand Final by Hawthorn.

The club qualified for the finals series again in 1972 in fourth with 14 wins and 8 losses. St Kilda defeated Essendon in the elimination final and Collingwood in the first semifinal before being eliminated in the preliminary final by Carlton.

1973 saw the club qualify for a record fourth consecutive finals series in fifth place with 12 wins. St Kilda defeated Essendon in the elimination final before being eliminated in the semifinals by Richmond.

1974 saw the Saints decline to the lower half of the ladder for the first time since the 1950s, finishing tenth with seven wins. The club failed to build on competitive seasons in 1975 and 1976. Allan Jeans' coaching career at St Kilda ended at the end of the 1976 season.

1978 began and ended strongly, but a mid-season slump saw the club narrowly miss the finals. 1979 began well with a win over Hawthorn before a run of defeats and finishing a clear last. Continuing financial pressures and defeats saw the club remain in the bottom three for every season from 1979 to 1986.

1980s

In 1987, with Tony Lockett at full forward, St Kilda moved out of the bottom three for the first time since 1982 with nine wins. Lockett won the Coleman Medal for leading goalkicker in the home and away season with 117 goals. He went on to win the AFL's highest individual award, the Brownlow Medal, the same year.

The league was officially renamed the Australian Football League prior to the start of the 1990 premiership season. A competitive 1991 premiership season saw St Kilda qualify for the finals series for the first time since 1973, qualifying fourth at the end of the home and away rounds. Tony Lockett won the Coleman Medal again with 118 goals. St Kilda was eliminated by Geelong in an elimination final. In a competitive 1992 season, St Kilda again qualified for the finals series, qualifying sixth at the end of the home and away rounds. St Kilda won its first finals series match since 1973 over Collingwood before being by eliminated from the 1992 Finals Series by Footscray in the semi-finals.

1996: First pre-season cup win

St Kilda won the 1996 AFL Ansett Australia Cup competition - the pre-premiership-season AFL Cup. The team had wins over Hawthorn in the round of 16, Adelaide in the quarter finals, West Coast in the semi-finals and defeated Carlton in the final 20-10 (130) to 10-12 (72) in front of 66,888 people at Waverley Park, with Nicky Winmar winning the Michael Tuck Medal for the player judged best on ground.[3][8]

1997: Second minor premiership

In the 1997 Premiership Season, St Kilda had a consistent home and away season, qualifying for the 1997 Final Series in first position at the end of the home and away rounds with 15 wins and 7 losses and winning the 1997 Minor Premiership - the second in the club's history. Robert Harvey won the league's highest individual award, the Brownlow Medal. St Kilda defeated Brisbane in the 1997 Qualifying Finals, defeated North Melbourne in the Preliminary Finals and was defeated in the 1997 AFL Grand Final by Adelaide.

Prior to the start of the 1998 Premiership Season - St Kilda won through to the 1998 AFL Ansett Australia Cup Final before being eliminated by North Melbourne. In a competitive 1998 Premiership Season, St Kilda again qualified for the finals series in sixth. Robert Harvey won a second successive Brownlow Medal. St Kilda was defeated by Sydney in the Qualifying Finals then eliminated by Melbourne in the Semi-Finals.

In 2000 the St Kilda Football Club moved to a new playing home at Docklands Stadium, Melbourne (currently also called Etihad Stadium, a sponsorship name) whilst maintaining training and administration headquarters at Moorabbin.

2004: Second pre-season cup win

2004 began with the club winning the 2004 Wizard Home Loans Cup. St Kilda had wins over Adelaide in the round of 16, Richmond in the quarter-finals, Essendon in the semi-finals and Geelong in the final - 1.14.5 (98) to 1.10.7 (76) - in front of 50,533 people at Docklands Stadium, with Robert Harvey winning the Michael Tuck Medal for the player judged best on ground during the final.[9][10] The 2004 Premiership Season saw the team win a then club record of 10 consecutive matches from round 1 to round 10. A consistent and competitive season saw St Kilda qualify third at the end of the home and away rounds and qualify for the finals series with 16 wins and 6 losses. Full-forward Fraser Gehrig won the Coleman Medal for the most goals (90) kicked in the 2004 home and away season. St Kilda was defeated by Brisbane in the qualifying finals, defeated Sydney in the semi-finals and were eliminated by eventual premiers Port Adelaide in the preliminary finals.

2005 season

In a consistent and competitive 2005 Premiership season, the Saints finished the home and away rounds in the top four in fourth position, qualifying for the finals series with 14 wins and 8 losses. Full-forward Fraser Gehrig again won the Coleman Medal for the most goals (74) kicked in the 2005 home and away season[11]. St Kilda defeated the 2005 minor Premiers Adelaide in Adelaide in the qualifying finals and went on to be eliminated by eventual premiers Sydney in the preliminary finals two weeks later.

2006 season

A competitive 2006 Premiership Season with 14 wins and 8 losses saw the club in sixth at the end of the home and away rounds and qualify for a third successive finals series. St Kilda was eliminated by Melbourne in the elimination finals.

On 11 October 2006, Ross Lyon was appointed as the new coach for the Saints for 2007 to 2009.

2008: Third pre-season cup win

2008 began with the team winning the AFL National Australia Bank Cup. The team had wins over Richmond in the round of 16, Geelong in the quarter-finals, Essendon in the semi-finals and won the final against the Adelaide Crows by 5 points at Football Park (AAMI stadium) in Adelaide 69 to 64. Jason Gram won the Michael Tuck Medal for the player judged best on ground during the final.[12][13][14]

In a competitive 2008 Premiership Season St Kilda again qualified for the finals series, a 108 point win over Essendon in the final home and away round saw the club take fourth position for the finals series with 13 wins. St Kilda was defeated by Geelong in the Qualifying Finals, defeated Collingwood in the Semi-Finals and was eliminated by the eventual premiers, Hawthorn, in the Preliminary Finals.

St Kilda was eliminated from the 2009 NAB Cup by Brisbane in the opening round.

2009: Third minor premiership

St Kilda won the club's first 19 games of the 2009 season, breaking the club record of 10 successive wins which was set in the first 10 games of the 2004 season. The winning streak was brought to end by Essendon in Round 20 when they defeated the Saints by two points - an after-the-siren shot at goal which would have won the game missed.

In Round 14, on 5 July, St Kilda played the premiership favourites Geelong, a club they had not beaten since 2006. Both teams were undefeated prior to the round 14 clash. St Kilda defeated Geelong by six points in what is widely regarded as one of the greatest home and away matches ever played in the AFL.[citation needed] The game broke many records including highest ever crowd for an AFL match at Etihad Stadium (54,444) as well as the latest in a season that two undefeated teams had met (the previous record was in Round 8, 1991 when West Coast played Essendon after being unbeaten). The game was sold out two weeks in advance, causing a change in timeslot (moving from 2.10 pm to 3.10 pm) so that the Seven Network could broadcast the game live in Victoria.

St Kilda went on to qualify for the 2009 AFL finals series in first position, winning the club's third minor premiership and second McClelland Trophy with 20 wins and 2 losses, one of the most dominant home and away seasons ever in AFL history.[2]

St Kilda defeated Collingwood in the qualifying finals and went on to qualify for the 2009 AFL Grand Final by defeating the Western Bulldogs in the preliminary finals. The club, however, did not win the 2009 AFL premiership in the grand final, a match in which the most dominant team of the season played against the most dominant teams of the past two seasons, Geelong. St Kilda was defeated by Geelong in the grand final by 12 points.

Ross Lyon signed a three year extension to his coaching contract, until the end of the 2012 season.[15]

Finals records

St Kilda Football Club Finals Series Matches Record
Opponent Played Won Drawn Lost Most Recent Final
Adelaide 2 1 0 1 2005 Qualifying Final Win
Brisbane 2 1 0 1 2004 Qualifying Final Loss
Carlton 5 0 0 5 1972 Preliminary Final Loss
Collingwood 9 6 0 3 2009 Qualifying Final Win
Essendon 4 3 0 1 1972 Elimination Final Win
Fitzroy 2 1 0 1 1913 Grand Final Loss
Geelong 4 0 0 4 2009 Grand Final Loss
Hawthorn 3 0 0 3 2008 Preliminary Final Loss
Melbourne 3 0 0 3 2006 Elimination Final Loss
North Melbourne 1 1 0 0 1997 Preliminary Final Win
Port Adelaide 1 0 0 1 2004 Preliminary Final Loss
Richmond 3 2 0 1 1971 Preliminary Final Win
Sydney 5 3 0 2 2005 Preliminary Final Loss
Western 3 1 0 2 2009 Preliminary Final Win
Overall 47 19 (40.43%) 0 28 2009 AFL Grand Final

Club symbols

Jumper

The original colours of the St Kilda Football Club are red, white and black. In the early years of the St Kilda Football Club, from 1873 to 1896, the Saints wore a thinly striped, red, white and black jumper which was also used in selected games during 2004 and 2005. It later changed to thicker red, white and black stripes. In 1915 St Kilda changed its colours to red, yellow and black. In 1923 the club returned to using the club's original colours of red, white & black. The club crest first appeared on the St Kilda Football Club jumper in approximately 1933. In 1953 the Saints' jumper took the look of the three stripes; red, white and black which has been used up until today, except for a period from 1997 to 2001 in which a stylized jumper which was based on the club crest was worn.[16]

1873-1896
1873-1896  
1897-1914
1897-1914  
1915-1918
1915-1918  
1919-1922
1919-1922  
1923-1952
1923-1952  
1953-1959
1953-1959  
1960-1996
1960-1996  
1997-2001
1997-2001  
2002-2009
2002-2009  
2010-
2010-  

The St Kilda jumper is three vertical stripes of red, white and black on the front with the club crest, a plain black back with white numbers. From 2008 the jumper's sponsor is Jeld-Wen, a windows and doors company. Jeld-Wen's logo also appears on the jumper.

In 1977 the VFL introduced official logos for the first time. Prior to 1977 logos were generally done by outside companies for sales of merchandise but were in no way official. All the club's logos were printed on shields and had navy blue top halves to represent the league. In 1980 the St Kilda logo had the border replaced with the club colour of red. In 1989 the logo changed to include the then AFL logo and the St Kilda crest sitting on the point posts.

In 1995 the club dropped the shield logo style and began using the club crest which first appeared on the St Kilda jumper about 1933. The St Kilda Football Club crest is one of the features of the Saints' jumper and is a symbol of the club.

Song

The club song is sung to the tune of "When The Saints Come Marching In".[17]

Oh when the Saints, go marching in.
Oh when the Saints go marching in.
Oh how I want to be with St Kilda.
When the Saints go marching in.

Oh when the Saints (oh when the Saints).
Go marching in (go marching in).
Oh when the Saints go marching in.
Oh how I want to be with St Kilda.
When the Saints go marching in.

Until 1964, when St Kilda played at the Junction Oval, the club song at every match was an adaptation of "I Do Like To Be Beside The Seaside". When the club moved to Moorabbin Oval a popular chant called "We are the Saints" was sung by supporters but, after the 1966 grand final, "When The Saints Go Marching In" eventually become established as the club song.

Home grounds

Docklands Stadium - St Kilda's home ground

Training, administration and social club facilities

Players training in front of the G. G. Huggins Stand and social club facilities at former home ground and current training ground Moorabbin Oval (Linen House Oval) prior to the 2009 AFL Grand Final

The club's training and administration base remained at Moorabbin Oval after home games were moved to Waverley Park (VFL Park) in 1991. Moorabbin remains the club's training, administration and social club base.

In 2008 it was announced that the club would build a multi-million dollar training and administration facility at Belvedere Park, Melbourne in Seaford near Frankston, approximately 21 kilometers from Moorabbin. The new facilities are currently under construction and are expected to be completed in August 2010.

St Kilda intends retaining its presence at Moorabbin Oval with the social club facilities at Moorabbin being expanded and Moorabbin Oval continuing to be part of the club's training facilities.

Club honours

Premierships

Winners (1):

Minor premierships

St Kilda have won the minor premiership for the team finishing on top of the ladder after the home and away rounds in three seasons:

Since 1991 the McClelland Trophy has been awarded for winning the minor premiership.

AFL pre-season cup wins

Winners (3):
  • Consolation Night Series wins
Winners (1):
  • Lightning Premiership
Winners (1):

Players and staff

Coaching staff Ross Lyon, Stephen Silvagni and Tony Elshaug at training prior to the 2009 AFL Grand Final
St Kilda Football Club
First team squad Coaching staff
Rookie List

NSW Scholarship

  • 96 Josh Duncan
  • 97 Kane Murphy
  • 98 Jackson Ferguson
  • 99 Ted Widmer

Head coach

Assistant coaches


Legend:
  • (c) Captain
  • (vc) Vice captain

Officials

Individual awards

Trevor Barker Award winners

The club's best and fairest award has been awarded since 1914. In The late 1990s the club named the award the Trevor Barker Award to honour the name and memory of Trevor Barker, a former St Kilda player and reserves coach.[18]

The person who has won the most St Kilda best and fairest awards:

Brownlow Medal winners

The Brownlow Medal is awarded to the "best and fairest" player in the Australian Football League (AFL) during the regular season (i.e., not including finals matches) as determined by votes cast by the officiating umpires after each game. It is the most prestigious award for individual players in the AFL. It is also widely acknowledged as the highest individual honour in the sport of Australian rules football.

Michael Tuck Medal winners

Since 1992, the Michael Tuck Medal has been awarded to the player adjudged best on ground during the AFL Cup Final held before the Premiership season begins each year. Three St Kilda Football Club players have won it.

Leigh Matthews Trophy winners

The Leigh Matthews Trophy is awarded by the AFL Players Association to the player voted the most valuable during the year, the award has been given out ever since Leigh Matthews first won it in 1982.

Coleman Medal winners

The Coleman Medal is awarded to the leading goal scorer in the league in the home and away season. Prior to 1955 the league's leading goal scorer was awarded the Leading Goalkicker Medal.

AFL Rising Star winners

The AFL Rising Star award is given to a young player considered to have significantly improved during the year. Every round, an Australian Football League rising star nomination is given to a standout young player. To be eligible for the award, a player must be under 21 on January 1 of that year, have played 10 or fewer senior games before the beginning of the season, and not have been suspended during the season.

Australian Football Hall of Fame

The Australian Football Hall of Fame was established in 1996, the Centenary year of the Australian Football League, to help recognise the contributions made to the sport of Australian rules football by players, umpires, media personalities, coaches and administrators[19]. It was initially established with 136 inductees. As of 2008, this figure has grown to 219, including 22 "Legends". Current St Kilda players voted into the AFL's Hall of Fame:

~ also played for Richmond, ^ also played for Carlton

St Kilda Hall of Fame

St Kilda Football Club's Hall of Fame[20] players are picked by a committee. St Kilda’s 2008 Hall of Fame committee featured Ross Smith, Greg Westaway, Archie Fraser, Russell Holmesby, Neil Roberts, Allan Jeans and Danny Frawley. It has been held in 2003, 2007 and 2008 with 13 players being inducted each time.

2008 Inductees

2007 Inductees

2003 Inductees

St Kilda Team of the Century: 1900 - 1999

At a special function in 2003 the St Kilda Football Club Team of the Century[21] was announced. Darrel Baldock, who captained the 1966 grand final team, was named as captain and Allan Jeans, who coached St Kilda for a record 17 years, was named as coach. Ian Stewart was also named a member of the AFL Team of the Century.

St Kilda Team of the Century: 1900 - 1999[22]
B: Barry Lawrence Verdun Howell Kevin Neale
HB: Trevor Barker Neil Roberts Daryl Griffiths
C: Nicky Winmar Ian Stewart Lance Oswald
HF: Stewart Loewe Darrel Baldock (C) Bill Mohr
F: Dave McNamara Tony Lockett Nathan Burke
Foll: Carl Ditterich Robert Harvey Ross G. Smith
Int: Barry Breen Robert Murray Alan Morrow
Jim A. Ross
Coach: Allan Jeans

Notable players of the past 30 years

Records and statistics

  • Biggest winning margin: 139 - 2005 (Round 22 v Brisbane Lions)
  • Largest attendance at a home game: 72,669 - 1978 (Waverley Park, v Collingwood)
  • Most members in a season: 33,522 - 2009 [23]
  • Most premiership points in a season: 80 - 2009
  • Most consecutive wins: 19 - 2009 (Rounds 1-19)
  • Most club best and fairest awards: 5 Nick Riewoldt (2002, 2004, 2006-7, 2009)
  • Most consecutive games: 123 Ian Synman (1961-68)
  • Most seasons as Leading Goalkicker: 12 Bill Mohr (1929-1940)
  • Most goals: 898 Tony Lockett (1983-94)
  • Most goals in a season: 132 Tony Lockett (1992)
  • Most goals kicked in a game: 15 Tony Lockett (1992, v Sydney Swans)
  • Most games: 383 Robert Harvey (1988-2008)
  • Most matches as coach: 332 Allan Jeans (1961-76)
  • Most matches as captain: 177 Danny Frawley (1987-95)

References

  1. ^ Ross, John & Hutchinson, Garrie, ed (1998). The Clubs. Penguin Books. p. 321. ISBN 0-670-87858-8. 
  2. ^ a b "2009 Season Scores and Results - Ladder". AFL Tables. 2009 00:00:00. http://stats.rleague.com/afl/seas/2009.html#lad. Retrieved 2009-11-09. 
  3. ^ a b "AFL 1996 Ansett Cup Grand Final - St Kilda v Carlton". Slattery Media Group. 1996-03-23. http://images.slatterymedia.com/image/?image_id=141079. Retrieved 2009-11-07. 
  4. ^ The Argus, 14 April 1873
  5. ^ a b [1]
  6. ^ History of the VFL: 1877 - 2007
  7. ^ Jim Main, Aussie Rules For Dummies (2nd edition, 2008) p. 45
  8. ^ "AFL 1996 Ansett Cup Grand Final - St Kilda v Carlton - Nicky Winmar of St Kilda with the trophy and his Michael Tuck Medal". Slattery Media Group. 1996-03-23. http://images.slatterymedia.com/image/?image_id=141078. Retrieved 2009-11-07. 
  9. ^ "AFL 2004 Wizard Cup Grand Final - Geelong v St Kilda". Slattery Media Group. 2004-03-13. http://images.slatterymedia.com/image/?image_id=114726. Retrieved 2009-11-07. 
  10. ^ "AFL 2004 Wizard Cup Grand Final – Geelong v St Kilda - Michael Tuck presents the Michael Tuck Medal to Robert Harvey". Slattery Media Group. 2004-03-13. http://images.slatterymedia.com/image/?image_id=114727. Retrieved 2009-11-07. 
  11. ^ http://www.afana.com/cgi-bin/footybbs/webbbs_config.pl/frames=n/read/2121
  12. ^ "St Kilda wins NAB cup". The Age. March 8, 2008. http://www.theage.com.au/news/national/st-kilda-wins-nab-cup-by-five-points/2008/03/08/1204780132457.html?s_cid=rss_news. Retrieved 2009-11-07. 
  13. ^ "Saints are NAB Cup Champions in 2008". Jeld-Wen. 8 March 2008. http://www.jeld-wen.com.au/pr/St-Kilda-2008/20080308.php. Retrieved 2009-11-07. 
  14. ^ "AFL 2008 NAB Cup Grand Final - Adelaide v St Kilda - Ross Lyon and Justin Koschitzke hold the 2008 NAB Cup". Slattery Media Group. 2008-03-08. http://images.slatterymedia.com/image/?image_id=67715. Retrieved 2009-11-08. 
  15. ^ "Lyon pledges future to Saints". St Kilda Football Club official website. 11:01 AM Fri 04 December, 2009. http://www.saints.com.au/season2009/news/newsarticle/tabid/5315/newsid/87828/default.aspx. Retrieved 27/12/2009. 
  16. ^ http://www.footyjumpers.com
  17. ^ http://www.footy.com.au/dags/songs/saints.html
  18. ^ "St Kilda Best & Fairest preview". St Kilda Football Club official website. 2:41 PM Fri 02 October, 2009. http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://mm.afl.com.au/Portals/0/tba_image2.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.saints.com.au/tabid/5315/default.aspx%3Fnewsid%3D85630&usg=__CSl-VZS15ZQzd23e3JsjcNBlmlo=&h=316&w=246&sz=91&hl=en&start=93&tbnid=M79xIlLqQeNQlM:&tbnh=117&tbnw=91&prev=/images%3Fq%3DTrevor%2BBarker%26gbv%3D2%26ndsp%3D20%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Dactive%26sa%3DN%26start%3D80. Retrieved 2009-11-09. 
  19. ^ http://www.afl.com.au/Season2007/Awards/HallofFame/tabid/265/Default.aspx Official Hall of Fame website
  20. ^ http://saints.com.au/Saints/TheClub/History/HallofFame/tabid/5391/Default.aspx
  21. ^ "St Kilda Football Club Team Of The Century". saints.com.au. http://www.saints.com.au/team%20of%20the%20century/tabid/15075/default.aspx. Retrieved 2009-11-03. 
  22. ^ "St Kilda Football Club Team Of The Century". footystamps.com.au. http://www.footystamps.com/st_team_of_the_century.htm. Retrieved 2009-11-03. 
  23. ^ http://www.saints.com.au/Membership/tabid/5428/default.aspx

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Melbourne
^VFL Minor Premiers
1965
Succeeded by
Collingwood
Preceded by
Essendon
^VFL Premiers
1966
Succeeded by
Richmond
Preceded by
North Melbourne
AFL Pre-season Cup Winners
1996
Succeeded by
Carlton
Preceded by
Sydney Swans
AFL Minor Premiers
1997
Succeeded by
North Melbourne
Preceded by
Adelaide
AFL Pre-season Cup Winners
2004
Succeeded by
Carlton
Preceded by
Carlton
AFL Pre-season Cup Winners
2008
Succeeded by
Geelong
Preceded by
Geelong
AFL Minor Premiers
2009
Succeeded by
incumbent


^The Australian Football League was called the Victorian Football League (VFL) prior to 1990.


Simple English


St Kilda Football Club (nicknamed The Saints) is an Australian Rules Football club who play in the Australian Football League. The club was founded in 1873. Their home ground is the Etihad Stadium in Docklands. The team won the 1966 premiership, beating Collingwood. However, they have also placed last 26 times. Their current captain is Nick Riewoldt and their current coach is Ross Lyon. In 2010 they played in the Grand Final and scored a draw with Collinwood. They were defeated in a rematch the next week.

The first mention of a football team in St Kilda was made in 1859.[1] The current club was started in 1873, based on the South Yarra Football Club which had closed the year before.[1] The club joined the new Victorian Football League in 1897, and lost its first 48 games.[1] Their home ground was the Junction Oval, in the Melbourne suburb of St. Kilda. In 1964, the team moved from St Kilda to Moorabbin.

References

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