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St Lawrence Jewry

St Lawrence Jewry is a Church of England guild church in the City of London on Gresham Street, next to the Guildhall.

Contents

History

The church was originally built in the twelfth century and dedicated to St Lawrence (the instrument of whose martyrdom, the gridiron, can still be seen on the present church's weathervane.)[1] The church is near the former medieval Jewish ghetto, which was centred on the street named Old Jewry.[2]

The church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London[3] and rebuilt by Christopher Wren between 1670 and 1687. It suffered extensive damage during the blitz on December 29, 1940,[4] but the bombing also destroyed buildings around the church affording passersby a wider view of it. It was restored in 1957 by Cecil Brown to Wren's original design. It is no longer a parish church but a guild church. It is the official church of the City of London Corporation.

Sir Thomas More preached in the older church on this site.[5]. The church was the burial place of merchant Francis Levett, as well as the site of the wedding of his niece Ann Levett, daughter of William Levett, Dean of Bristol and former Principal of Magdalen Hall, Oxford (today's Hertford College)[6].

The church was described by Sir John Betjeman as "very municipal, very splendid."[7] It was designated a Grade I listed building on January 4, 1950.[8]

Vicars (incomplete list)

Notes

  1. ^ "London:the City Churches” Pevsner,N/Bradley,S New Haven, Yale, 1998 ISBN 0300096550
  2. ^ "The Visitors Guide to the City of London Churches" Tucker,T: London, Friends of the City Churches, 2006 ISBN 0955394503
  3. ^ Mentioned in Pepys's Diary "Samuel Pepys-The Shorter Pepys" Latham,R(Ed) pp 484: Harmondsworth,1985 ISBN 0140094180
  4. ^ "The Old Churches of London" Cobb,G: London,Batsford,1942
  5. ^ "St Lawrence Jewry". London Taxi Tour. http://www.londontaxitour.com/london-taxi-tour-sights-churches-st-lawrence-jewry.htm. Retrieved 2009-04-11.  
  6. ^ Publications of the Harleian Society, Vol. XXVI, London, 1887
  7. ^ "The City of London Churches" Betjeman, J, Andover, Pikin, 1967 ISBN 0853721122
  8. ^ Images of England — details from listed building database (199500) accessed 23 January 2009
  9. ^ Palmer, Stephen in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.
  10. ^ Parkens, Samuel in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.
  11. ^ Vines, Richard in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.
  12. ^ Ward, Seth in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.
  13. ^ Wilkins, John in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.
  14. ^ Whichcote, Benjamin in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.
  15. ^ Mapletoft, John in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.
  16. ^ Barrass, James Stephen in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.

See also

External links

Coordinates: 51°30′55″N 0°05′33″W / 51.5152°N 0.0925°W / 51.5152; -0.0925

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