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St Luke Old Street (church): Wikis

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St. Luke Old Street
2006 photo
2006 photo

Country United Kingdom
Denomination Deconsecrated, previously Church of England
Architecture
Architect(s) John James and Nicholas Hawksmoor
Administration
Parish St. Luke's

St Luke is a historic Anglican church building in the London Borough of Islington. It is now used as a concert hall by the London Symphony Orchestra and known as LSO St Luke's.

Contents

History

The church is sited on Old Street, north of the City of London, and was built to relieve the church of St Giles-without-Cripplegate, Cripplegate[1], under the Commission for Building Fifty New Churches, an attempt to meet the religious needs of London's burgeoning 18th century population. It was completed and the corresponding parish of St Luke's created in 1733.

The church was designed by John James, though the obelisk spire, west tower and flanking staircase wings were by Nicholas Hawksmoor.[2]

William Caslon I in an engraved portrait by John Faber the Younger.

Buried in the small churchyard, are architect George Dance the Elder, at one time a member of the vestry, and in a chest tomb, father and son type founders William Caslon[3].

Deconsecration and reuse

The parish was reunited with St Giles in 1959 and St. Luke's font and organ case moved there. The church was closed by the Diocese of London in 1964 and lay empty, the roof being removed and the shell becoming a ruin for 40 years, despite being a Grade I listed building.

After several proposals to redevelop it as offices, it was converted by the St Luke Centre Management Company Ltd for the London Symphony Orchestra as a concert hall, rehearsal, recording space and educational resource. The conversion was designed by Levitt Bernstein Architects[4]. A total of 1053 burials were recorded and removed during the restoration of the crypt.

Events

During 2006 the BBC used the venue to record intimate concerts by Bruce Springsteen and Paul Simon for broadcast. Sir Elton John also recorded an intimate concert which was used to publicise his then recently-released album The Captain & The Kid. In 2007 MTV used the venue to record an intimate concert from Editors, which is due to be broadcast in the UK in June 2007. Van Morrison will perform a concert that was recorded at this venue on BBC Four Sessions on 25 April 25 2008 that will feature some of the songs from his 2008 album, Keep It Simple.[5]

Notes

External links

Coordinates: 51°31′30.66″N 0°5′38.61″W / 51.5251833°N 0.0940583°W / 51.5251833; -0.0940583

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