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Stafford
County constituency
StaffordConstituency.svg
EnglandStaffordshire.svg
Stafford shown within Staffordshire, and Staffordshire shown within England
Created: 1295, 1983
MP: David Kidney
Party: Labour
Type: House of Commons
County: Staffordshire
EP constituency: West Midlands

Stafford is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election. The sitting MP is David Kidney. The Conservatives have selected Jeremy Lefroy to contest the seat at the next General Election.

Contents

Boundaries

The constituency includes the southerly part of the borough of Stafford, including the town of Stafford itself, plus the Penkridge area of South Staffordshire district.

Political complexion

Labour has only gained the seat on two occasions:

  • In their landslide victory in 1945, but the Conservatives regained the seat at the next election, in 1950.
  • Boundary changes in 1997 made Stafford somewhat more marginal than previously, and Labour gained the constituency in their landslide victory in 1997. The defeated Tory candidate in 1997 was David Cameron, who in the next election was elected as the MP for the safe seat of Witney, and became the Conservative Party leader in 2005.

Members of Parliament

1295-1640

  • Constituency created (1295)

1640-1885

Year First member First party Second member Second party
April 1640 ?  ?
November 1640 Ralph Sneyd Royalist Richard Weston Royalist
October 1642 Weston disabled from sitting - seat vacant
May 1643 Sneyd disabled from sitting - seat vacant
1645 John Swinfen Edward Leigh
December 1648 Swinfen and Leigh excluded in Pride's Purge - both seats vacant
1653 Stafford was unrepresented in the Barebones Parliament
1654 John Bradshaw Stafford had only one seat in the First and
Second Parliaments of the Protectorate
1656 Martin Noel
January 1659 William Jessop
May 1659 Not represented in the restored Rump
April 1660 John Swinfen Sir Charles Wolseley
1661 Robert Milward William Chetwynd
1674 Walter Chetwynd
February 1679 Sir Thomas Armstrong
August 1679 Sir Thomas Wilbraham
1681 Edwin Skrymsher
1685 Walter Chetwynd Rowland Okeover
1689 Philip Foley John Chetwynd
1690 Jonathan Cope
1694 Thomas Foley
1695 Philip Foley
January 1701 John Chetwynd
November 1701 John Pershall
July 1702 John Chetwynd
December 1702 Walter Chetwynd [9]
1711 Henry Vernon
1712 1st Viscount Chetwynd
1715 William Chetwynd
1722 Thomas Foley John Dolphin
1724 Francis Elde [10]
1725 1st Viscount Chetwynd
1727 Joseph Gascoigne Nightingale
1734 Hon. William Chetwynd
3rd Viscount Chetwynd
from 1767
Thomas Foley
1738 2nd Viscount Chetwynd
1747 John Robins
1754 William Richard Chetwynd
1765 John Crewe Whig
1768 Richard Whitworth
1770 William Neville Hart
1774 Hugo Meynell
1780 Hon. Edward Monckton Tory Richard Brinsley Sheridan Whig
1806 Richard Mansel-Philipps Tory
1812 Ralph Benson Thomas Wilson
1818 Benjamin Benyon Whig Samuel Homfray
1820 Sir George Chetwynd Whig
June 1826 Richard Ironmonger Ralph Benson
December 1826 Thomas Beaumont Whig
1830 John Campbell Whig Thomas Gisborne Whig
1832 William Fawkener Chetwynd Whig Rees Howell Gronow Whig
January 1835 Sir Francis Goodricke Conservative
May 1835 Writ suspended - seat left vacant[11]
1837 Robert Farrand Conservative
1841 Hon. Swynfen Carnegie Conservative Edward Manningham-Buller Whig
1847 David Urquhart Conservative Thomas Sidney Conservative
1852 John Ayshford Wise Whig Arthur Otway Whig
1857 Viscount Ingestre Conservative
1859 Liberal Thomas Salt Conservative
1860 Thomas Sidney Liberal
1865 Michael Bass Liberal Walter Meller Conservative
1868 [12] Henry Davis Pochin Liberal
1869 Thomas Salt Conservative Hon. Reginald Talbot Conservative
1874 Alexander Macdonald Liberal-Labour
1880 Charles McLaren Liberal
1881 Thomas Salt Conservative
1885 Representation reduced to one member

1885-1950

Election Member Party
1885 Charles McLaren Liberal
1886 Thomas Salt Conservative
1892 Sir Theodore Shaw Liberal
1910 Sir Richard Essex Liberal
1918 Hon. William Ormsby-Gore Coalition Conservative
1922 Conservative
1938 Peter Thorneycroft Conservative
1945 Stephen Swingler Labour
1950 Constituency abolished: see Stafford & Stone

1983-present

Election Member Party
1983 Constituency re-established
1983 Sir Hugh Fraser Conservative
1984 by-election Bill Cash Conservative
1997 David Kidney Labour

Election results

Elections of the 2010s

General Election 2010: Stafford[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
BNP Roland Hynd[14]
Conservative Jeremy Lefroy
Green Mike Shone
Labour David Kidney
UKIP Roy Goode
Majority
Turnout

Elections of the 2000s

General Election 2005: Stafford[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour David Kidney 19,889 43.7 -4.3
Conservative David Chambers 17,768 39.0 +2.4
Liberal Democrat Barry Stamp 6,390 14.0 +4.5
UKIP Frederick Goode 1,507 3.3 -1.9
Majority 2,121 4.7 -6.7
Turnout 45,554 64.7 -0.6
Labour hold Swing -3.3
General Election 2001: Stafford[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour David Kidney 21,285 48.0 +0.4
Conservative Philip Cochrane 16,253 36.6 -2.6
Liberal Democrat Jeanne Pinkerton 4,205 9.5 -1.1
UKIP Earl of Bradford 2,315 5.2 N/A
Rock 'n' Roll Loony Michael Hames 308 0.7 N/A
Majority 5,032 11.4
Turnout 44,366 65.3 -12.2
Labour hold Swing

Elections of the 1990s

General Election 1997: Stafford[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour David Kidney 24,606 47.5 +12.6
Conservative David Cameron 20,292 39.2 -8.9
Liberal Democrat P.A. Hornby 5,840 10.6 -5.9
Referendum Party S.R. Culley 1,146 2.2 N/A
Monster Raving Loony Ashton May 248 0.5 N/A
Majority 4,314 8.3
Turnout
Labour gain from Conservative Swing

Elections of the 1980s

3 May 1984 by-election: Stafford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Bill Cash 18,713 40.4 -10.8
Social Democrat David Dunn 14,733 31.8 +7.1
Labour Michael Poulter 12,677 27.4 +3.7
Independent Christopher Teasdale 210 0.4 N/A
Majority 3,980 8.6 -17.9
Turnout 46,333 65.6 -10.9
Conservative hold Swing
Registered Electors 70,635
  • Death of Sir Hugh Fraser 6 March 1984

Notes and references

  1. ^ Dictionary of National Biography
  2. ^ a b c Leigh Rayment's historical list of MPs: Constituencies beginning with "S", part 4
  3. ^ J E Neale, The Elizabethan House of Commons (London: Jonathan Cape, 1949)
  4. ^ , Heywood Townshend, Historical Collections:: or, An exact Account of the Proceedings of the Four last Parliaments of Q. Elizabeth (1680) [1]
  5. ^ Heywood Townshend, Historical Collections:: or, An exact Account of the Proceedings of the Four last Parliaments of Q. Elizabeth (1680) [2]
  6. ^ a b c d Cobbett's Parliamentary history of England, from the Norman Conquest in 1066 to the year 1803 (London: Thomas Hansard, 1808) [3]
  7. ^ Maija Jansson (ed.), Proceedings in Parliament, 1614 (House of Commons) (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 1988)
  8. ^ Maija Jansson (ed.), Proceedings in Parliament, 1614 (House of Commons) (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 1988)
  9. ^ Chetwynd was initially declared re-elected in 1710, but on petition (in a dispute over the franchise), he was adjudged not have been duly elected and his opponent, Vernon, was seated in his place. (Robert Beatson, A Chronological Register of Both Houses of Parliament (1807), Volume 1, p 177)
  10. ^ Elde's opponent, Chetwynd, petitioned against the result. Elde was "unanimously expelled the House for having offered to compromise the petition against his return", and Chetwynd was seated in his place. (Henry Stooks Smith, The Parliaments of England from 1715 to 1847, Volume 2 (London: Simpkin, Marshall & Co, 1845), p 45)
  11. ^ After Goodricke resigned to contest another constituency in May 1835, the House of Commons refused to issue a writ for a new election until February 1837, when the motion to issue a writ was passed by a single vote. (F W S Craig, British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885, 2nd edition, Aldershot: Parliamentary Research Services, 1989, p 283)
  12. ^ The 1868 election was declared void on petition and a new election was held - F W S Craig, British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885. (F W S Craig, British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885, 2nd edition, Aldershot: Parliamentary Research Services, 1989, p 283)
  13. ^ http://ukpollingreport.co.uk/guide/seat-profiles/stafford
  14. ^ http://bnpelectionresults.blogspot.com/2010/03/2nd-time-today-that-news-media-report.html
  15. ^ BBC 2005 General Election Site
  16. ^ BBC 2001 General Election Site
  17. ^ BBC 1997 General Election Site

Bibliography

  • Craig, F. W. S. (1983) [1969]. British parliamentary election results 1918-1949 (3rd edition ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. ISBN 0-900178-06-X. 
  • Britain Votes/Europe Votes By-Election Supplement 1983-, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (Parliamentary Research Services 1985)
  • Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs
  • Robert Beatson, A Chronological Register of Both Houses of Parliament (London: Longman, Hurst, Res & Orme, 1807) [4]
  • D Brunton & D H Pennington, Members of the Long Parliament (London: George Allen & Unwin, 1954)
  • Cobbett's Parliamentary history of England, from the Norman Conquest in 1066 to the year 1803 (London: Thomas Hansard, 1808) [5]
  • Henry Stooks Smith, The Parliaments of England from 1715 to 1847, Volume 2 (London: Simpkin, Marshall & Co, 1845) [6]

See also


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