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Standard time is the result of synchronizing clocks in different geographical locations within a time zone to the same time rather than using the local meridian as in local mean time or solar time. The time so set has come to be defined in terms of offsets from Universal Time. (See more about standard time.)

Where daylight saving time is used, "standard time" may refer to the time without daylight saving time.

Contents

History of standard time

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Great Britain

A standardized time system was first used by British railways on December 11, 1847, when they switched from local mean time to Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). It was also given the name Railway time reflecting the important role the railway companies played in bringing it about. The vast majority of Great Britain's public clocks were being synchronised using GMT by 1855.

North America

Prior to 1883, local mean time was used throughout North America, resulting in an inordinate number of local times. This caused convoluted regional and national train schedules. Sandford Fleming, a Canadian, proposed Standard Time at a meeting of the Royal Canadian Institute on February 8, 1879. On October 11, 1883, the heads of the major railroads met in Chicago at the former Grand Pacific Hotel[1] to adopt the Standard Time System of four standard time zones for the continental U.S.A.. The new system was adopted by most states almost immediately after railroads did so. At noon on November 18, 1883, the U.S. Naval Observatory changed its telegraphic signals to correspond to the change.[2] The Act of March 19, 1918, sometimes called the Standard Time Act, established standard time in time zones in U.S. law. The Standard Time Act also established daylight saving time (DST), which was repealed in 1919 but was reestablished nationally during World War II.[3]

In 2007 the United States enacted a federal law formalizing the use of Coordinated Universal Time as the basis of standard time, and the role of the Secretary of Commerce (effectively, the National Institute of Standards and Technology) and the Secretary of the Navy (effectively, the U.S. Naval Observatory) in interpreting standard time.[4]

See also

References

Further reading


Simple English

Standard time is putting all clocks in a time zone to the same time.

Standard time can also be used to mean the time without daylight saving time. Standard time happens from autumn to early spring. Daylight saving time happens from early spring to autumn.

Contents

History

Great Britain

Standard time was first used by British railways on December 11, 1847, when they switched from local mean time to Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). Almost all of Great Britain's public clocks were using GMT by 1855.

North America

Before 1883, local mean time was used in all of North America. This meant there were many different local times. This caused problems for train schedules. Sandford Fleming, a Canadian, proposed standard time at a meeting of the Royal Canadian Institute on February 8, 1879. The owners of the major railroads met in Chicago to make the Standard Time System. Most states began using the system soon after the railroads. The U.S. government officially began using the system almost fifty years later.

Criticism

Some people do not like standard time (and daylight saving time). Some people do not like it because they do not trust in government. Others believe that it disturbs circadian rhythms. Others simply like traditional, natural markers of time, like sunsets, noon and sunrise.[1]

References

More reading


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