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Standish Darby O'Grady, 2nd Viscount Guillamore (26 Dec 1792 – 22 July 1848) from Cahir Guillamore, County Limerick, was an Anglo-Irish politician.

He was elected in 1820 as Member of Parliament for County Limerick, and held the seat until 1826. He was re-elected in February 1830, but in May his name was struck from the electoral return and replaced with that of James Dawson. O'Grady was re-elected in August 1830, and served until 1835.

He succeeded to the peerage as Viscount Guillamore on 21 April 1840 on the death of his father, the 1st Viscount.

He was a lieutenant in the 7th hussars at Waterloo , and afterwards became lieutenant-colonel. On 17 June 1815 he had command of the troop of the 7th hussars on the high road from Genappe to Quatre Bras. The regiment was covering the British march from Quatre Bras to Waterloo, and Sir William Dörnberg left O'Grady outside the town, on the Quatre Bras road, to hold in check the advancing French cavalry while the main body of the regiment was proceeding in file across the narrow bridge of Genappe and up the steep street of the town. O'Grady advanced at the head of his troops as soon as the French appeared, and presented so bold a front that, after a time, they retired. When they were out of sight he crossed the bridge at the entrance of Genappe, and took his troop at a gallop through the town, rejoining Sir William Dörnberg, who had drawn up the main body of the regiment on the sloping road at the Waterloo end of Genappe. A severe cavalry combat ensued when the French lancers reached the top of the town, in which O'Grady's regiment made a gallant charge, with considerable loss.

At Waterloo he was stationed on the ground above Hougoumont on the British left. ‘The 7th,’ he says in a letter to his father, ‘had an opportunity of showing what they could do if they got fair play. We charged twelve or fourteen times, and once cut off a squadron of cuirassiers, every man of whom we killed on the spot except the two officers and one Marshal de Logis, whom I sent to the rear’ (letter in possession of the Hon. Mrs. Norbury). Two letters of his to Captain William Siborne, describing the movements of his regiments on 17 and 18 June 1815, are printed in ‘Waterloo Letters,’ edited by Major- general H. T. Siborne (London, 1891, pp. 130-6).

By his wife Gertrude Jane (d. 1871), daughter of the Hon. Berkeley Paget, he had issue Standish, third viscount (1832-1860); Paget Standish, fourth viscount (1838-1877); Hardress Standish, fifth viscount (b. 1841); and others.

References

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Windham Quin, Lord Adare and
Richard FitzGibbon
Member of Parliament for County Limerick
1820 – 1826
Served alongside: Richard FitzGibbon
Succeeded by
Richard FitzGibbon and
Thomas Lloyd
Preceded by
Richard FitzGibbon and
Thomas Lloyd
Member of Parliament for County Limerick
1830
Served alongside: Richard FitzGibbon
Succeeded by
Richard FitzGibbon and
James Dawson
Preceded by
Richard FitzGibbon and
James Dawson
Member of Parliament for County Limerick
1830 – 1835
Served alongside: Richard FitzGibbon
Succeeded by
Richard FitzGibbon and
William Smith O'Brien
Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by
Standish O'Grady
Viscount Guillamore
1840 – 1848
Succeeded by
Standish O'Grady
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