The Full Wiki

More info on Staphylococcal infection

Staphylococcal infection: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Staphylococcal infection
Classification and external resources

SEM micrograph of S. aureus colonies; note the grape-like clustering common to Staphylococcus species.
MeSH D013203

Staphylococcus can cause a wide variety of infections in humans and other animals through either toxin production or invasion.

Staphylococcal toxins are a common cause of food poisoning, as it can grow in improperly-stored food.

Contents

Coagulase-positive

The main coagulase-positive Staphylococcus is Staphylococcus aureus.

These bacteria can survive on dry surfaces, increasing the chance of transmission. S. aureus is also implicated in toxic shock syndrome; during the 1980s some tampons allowed the rapid growth of S. aureus, which released toxins that were absorbed into the bloodstream. Any S. aureus infection can cause the staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, a cutaneous reaction to exotoxin absorbed into the bloodstream. It can also cause a type of septicaemia called pyaemia. The infection can be life-threatening. Problematically, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a major cause of hospital-acquired infections, and is being recognized with increasing frequency in community-acquired infections.

Main Staphylococcus aureus infections
Type Examples
Localized skin infections

Diffuse skin infection

Deep, localized infections

Other infections

Toxinoses

Unless else specified in boxes, then reference is [1]

Other infections include:

  • Closed-space infections of the fingertips, known as paronychia.

Coagulase-negative

  • In recent years, several other Staphylococcus species have been implicated in human infections, notably S. lugdunensis, S. schleiferi, and S. caprae.

References

  1. ^ Page 349 in: Fisher, Bruce; Harvey, Richard P.; Champe, Pamela C.. Lippincott's Illustrated Reviews: Microbiology (Lippincott's Illustrated Reviews Series). Hagerstown, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. ISBN 0-7817-8215-5.  

External links

Staph Infections Information

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message